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Posted by sherri on September 09, 2000 at 22:04:59:

In Reply to: Re: Banning Peanuts at daycare centers posted by Jen on March 22, 2000 at 19:00:45:

: : : My toddler has a peanut allergy, and attends preschool at a church day care center. I am looking for info from other parents in same situation. I would like our center to ban peanuts in her classroom, to prevent exposure and possible reaction--they currently have no policy on this and seem reluctant to institute one. Have heard many daycare centers in other states ban peanuts regardless of whether any student in a class has this allergy. Does anyone have any info on this, or advice if your child has peanut allergy, but school still allows peanuts? Please email replies to lmrichoux@aol.com. Thanks!

: : I can understand your concern for your toddler but if we ban peanuts because your child is allergic to them does that mean we should ban milk if my child were allergic to dairy?? You can certainly ask you childs teacher if she would refrain from serving peanuts and things with peanut oil etc in them for this year but to ban them is a little much to ask when you consider how many other children are allergic to things other than peanuts. How many diabetics are in your childs class?? They should not have concentrated sweets but we don't ban those either. I am not trying to be harsh just want to remind you that there are others out there who also need special diets etc and it would be a bit rediculous to ban peanuts with out banning all the other things the other children can't have due to allegies or medical conditions.

:
: You raise an interesting point about other allergies and conditions but I'm afraid I must disagree. A peanut allergy is a life threatening allergy. Children and adults have died from reactions before medical aid has arrived. While the examples you raised are serious, a milk allergy doesn't often lead to anaphylatic shock and a short term increase in blood sugar in a diabetic is not life threatening. The problem with peanuts and peanut oil is they easily contaminate other foods. I have a close friend who went into anaphylatic shock after eating a contaminated brownie (luckily, he made it to the hospital in time). A teacher in my hometown died after tasting cookie dough contaminated with nuts. I encourage Michele to keep working on the day care centre. The suggestion to have the teacher refrain from serving peanut products is a good start. One school near my home has sent home letters outlining foods to be avoided and has asked parents to not include those foods in lunches. This helps to raise awareness about the issue if the centre is unwilling to place a total ban.


I disagree also. I have a peanut allergic son who attends preschool. The school was very reluctant to say no peanuts. I said that would be fine except he can have reactions from peanut residue on kids hands, toys, tables, etc. Some kids can have reactions from the smell of peanuts. Peanuts and nuts are the only foods I know of that can cause reactions from touching or smelling the food. My son had a reaction on a peanut free plane flight from residue on the seat cushion. If only not eating the food was the problem I would have no reason to argue their policies.

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