It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Message Board
THIS MESSAGE BOARD IS NO LONGER ACTIVE. TO SEE OUR ACTIVE MESSAGE BOARDS, PLEASE GO HERE





Message
Posted by Sarah Knoffler on October 18, 2000 at 12:45:17:

In Reply to: Alzheimer's chats posted by Judith on October 17, 2000 at 16:15:06:

: I found that AlzheimerSupport.com is hosting a series of chats with speakers from an upcoming Alzheimerís conference in Santa Barbara. Check out the schedule at this link:
: https://www.alzheimersupport.com:445/track/alz_assoc/AGBRPOST2.cfm

I know of another chat too....,
At DNA.com Wednesday, October 18, 2000 2pm EST.....................................................

Alzheimer's disease, also known as Alzheimer's dementia, results in a progressive and irreversible loss
of higher brain functions, and is known to have inherited components. An international team of
researchers has discovered evidence of another gene that may play a role in the development of
the disease. Dr. Robert Friedland and Dr. Amos Korczyn have been studying a small rural community
of Arabs in Israel with unusually high rates of Alzheimer's but unusually low levels of ApoE-4, the
gene typically associated with Alzheimer's. Researchers believe there may be many genes linked to
Alzheimer's, and the research into the genetics of this small, close-knit and inbred community may
hold the key to understanding more about how Alzheimer's works.

Robert P. Friedland, M.D., is the chief of the Laboratory of Neurogeriatrics at Case Western Reserve
University School of Medicine, where he also serves as an associate professor of neurology. Dr.
Amos D. Korczyn, M.D., is a professor of neurology at the Sackler School of Medicine and Chairman
of the Helsinki Committee at Tel Aviv University. He is also chairman of the Neurology Department at
the Tel Aviv Medical Center. He will be joining Dr. Friedland to discuss the implications of their study
and talk about the search for the elusive Alzheimer's genes.

Robert P. Friedland, M.D., is the Chief of the Laboratory of Neurogeriattrics at Case Western
Reserve University School of Medicine, where he also serves as an associate professor of neurology.
A former research fellow of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Friedland has served as the chief of
Brain Aging and Dementia as well as the Deputy Clinical Director of the National Institute on Aging.
He was the founder and first director of the University of California, Davis' Northern California
Alzheimer's Disease Center. Dr. Friedland participated in a fellowship in neurology at the Boston
University School of Medicine before earning his medical degree from the City University of New
York's Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Amos D. Korczyn, M.D., is a professor of Neurology at the Sackler School of Medicine and
Chairman of the Helsinki Committee at Tel Aviv University. He is also Chairman of the Neurology
Department at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. Dr. Korczyn was educated at the Hebrew University,
Jerusalem, where he earned his Master's degree in Pharmacology Summa Cum Laude before receiving
his medical degree. Dr. Korczyn currently serves on the editorial and advisory boards of a number of
scientific journals, including the Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, Alzheimer's Disease
and Associated Disorders, and Clinical Neuropharmacology.

Follow Ups

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:48 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!