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Posted by David's Mom on July 28, 2000 at 13:39:27:

In Reply to: choosing the right anethesia for autistic child posted by Karrie on July 27, 2000 at 21:09:43:

: please if anyone knows about this email me. My son who is 9 and autistic is to have surgery on Aug. 9 and I need to know if there is anyone who knows if there is a detrimental anesthesia. I am researching everywhere I can about this and would appreciate any info. thanks

My son is 4yr. old (autistic and mild/mod. mentally impaired) and just underwent his fourth operation (tonsillectomy). The best thing you can do for yourself and your son is to get as much info. as you can. Anesthesia is NEVER without its risks. However, what is used and how much depends on the type of surgery that is being done. Alot also depends on what other medical issues are involved. My son has Asthma, so it's vitally important to keep a close eye on his oxygen saturation level. Being an informed parent also means making sure that ALL the members of your son's medical team know the full extent of his medical history (including nurses, recovery room staff, additional doctors, anesthesiologist, etc.). Alot of the time the anesthesiologist (and the doctor) will talk to you ahead of time. You can ask questions and express your concerns then or, if possible, find out who the anesthesiologist is and take care of it ahead of time. As for certain types of anethesia being more risky to an autistic child, I'm not aware of any particular anethesia that's more risky to Autistic kids, but I'm not the expert here. That's where consulting closely with the anethesiologist will help. Also, sometimes (depending on the hospital) special arrangements can be made to make the child more comfortable. I asked to be allowed in the recovery room prior to my son's waking up. Past experience has taught me that he will have a much easier time if someone he knows is there when he first opes his eyes. Hopefully, all of this info will help. It's hard to keep it all in perspective when you've got other issues to deal with. Good luck with your son's surgery and I'll prayer that all goes well for you and your family. Take care, David's Mom.

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