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Old 07-25-2012, 03:50 PM   #8
sammy64 sammy64 is offline
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Re: New labs, 6 weeks after adding Cytomel. Erg ....

I really think you should talk to your doctor about your next dose sizes and come up with a plan that makes sense to both of you.

It might be a good idea to let him know you'd been taking your levo with coffee all these years. You could then let him know your new dosing time based upon what you've learned.

I'm just not comfortable suggesting Levo dose increases higher than the 12.5mcg my doctor ordered for me.

I was started on 5mcg Cytomel (and divided it into two doses) and that's the highest dose I ever took. Admittedly, my FreeT3 level was just under mid-range when I started and rose to 85% of range....it's stayed there ever since.

If I ever needed a dose increase, I know I wouldn't want to increase the dose more than 2.5mcg at a time. T3 is powerful stuff.

I'm also aware of many people having much difficulty when titrating up on Cytomel and some even when titrating up with Levothyroxine....and we're talking the smallest size dose increases.

I know you fared relatively well with Cytomel so far...maybe that's a sign you could handle a larger dose increase. Hopefully, your endo can advise you in that regard.

The words of my first-ever thyroid forum always play in my head and I continually repeat it here because it worked for me.....slow and steady.

As I've mentioned, you can expect the roller coaster experience at least until both your FreeT4 and FreeT3 levels are above mid-range.

Trying to take the rocket rollercoaster just doesn't work. Large dose increases can get you on the rocket rollercoaster line and there's no getting off the line until after you've been on the ride for 2 wks. (the amount of time it takes for a too-high levo dose increase to stop having effects).

Moving thyroid hormone levels just don't feel good.....and the more you try to make those levels move, the worse you can feel.

The roller coaster ride usually smooths out once levels are higher but, you're still on the ride - it's just that the ups and downs aren't as dramatic and the frequency/intensity of them can also be lower.
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Last edited by sammy64; 07-25-2012 at 06:25 PM.

 
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