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Old 07-26-2012, 05:36 AM   #12
sammy64 sammy64 is offline
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Re: New labs, 6 weeks after adding Cytomel. Erg ....

Just because T3 has a short half-life doesn't mean that the FreeT3 level won't increase with sufficient amounts of T3.

You see, by taking exogenous T3, your body will eventually get as much T3 as it needs to function....you just need to slowly build up the dose so it will reflect in your FreeT3 level.

You were obviously very deficient in T3 so, the amounts you were taking thus far probably only helped with your body's immediate needs and didn't allow it to accumulate in the blood.

The thing with thyroid hormone is that, once you're taking enough to allow it to reflect appropriately (optimally) in levels, you don't want to take more than you need.

Just because 12.5mcg didn't accomplish much doesn't mean you will necessarily need 25mcg to optimize your levels.

I am aware of people who increased their T3 dose every 3 weeks and it wasn't reflecting in levels. Some got as high as 25mcg after doing this for 3 months.

All of a sudden, that T3 "showed up" and they became hyper....and had to lower their dose.

It's quite the process for the body to adjust to new levels of hormone.

The body runs through an "inventory" with hormone levels. It monitors how much hormone is in the blood stream....how many receptors are empty and what needs filling... what processing and system functions (digestion, metabolism, energy levels, body temp - all that happy stuff) are doing...

It keeps track of how much hormone is becoming available, and how consistently, either through gland production or supplementation. All the while, the body tries to maintain homeostasis.

Sometimes, the body just can't keep up with all the changes frequent or large dose adjustments can mean.

Even though you've been on 12.5mcg for 6 wks. and *should* show improvements in your levels, we don't know what your body has been doing as it's been "taking inventory"....only because you increased your dose more frequently before that.

There's also a chance you might be a person who just doesn't respond to synthetic T3 so your next labs will be very telling (if you get a Cytomel dose increase).

Please realize that the Total T3 test measures all levels of T3: FreeT3 and that which is bound to proteins.

We don't know what your FreeT3 level was before starting meds and the change in your TotalT3 level is nominal. In fact, it would be interpreted as pretty much the same as your old level.

Maybe your new TotalT3 level is comprised of more FreeT3 than your old one - no one will ever know.

That's why it's really important to get a FreeT3 test.

Your next appointment with the endo will also be very telling. If you don't get dose increases, it's clear you need to see a different doctor.

You might be able to achieve wellness with just TotalT3 testing but, I think you understand just how important the FreeT3 test is.

If you do have to find another doctor, I'd be sure he/she also monitors the FreeT3 level.
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