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Old 11-29-2004, 07:17 AM   #1
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Exclamation How to tell: Hormonal Acne

How do you know if your acne is hormonal?

Is it natural for your acne to change? Like, I used to get acne in isolated places, now I get tiny little closed comedones all over my face and right under my jawline. Or do taking antibiotics change the type of acne you have?

 
Old 11-29-2004, 07:26 AM   #2
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

I would also like to know this because all my acne is on my chin and jawline.

 
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Old 11-29-2004, 07:50 AM   #3
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

All acne is usually hormonal unless you are allergic or intolerant to a particular food or are using pore-clogging/irritating skin care. Therefore, if you want to know how hormonal your acne is, I suggest visiting an Endocrinologist. They will test you for a variety of hormonal/health problems (adrenal, thyroid, androgen, etc) and tell you what your hormonal situation is and what they can help you do about it.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 09:19 AM   #4
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

It is normal for your acne to change, as you get older. I also heard that most jaw line acne is hormonal acne (which means you will get rid of it as you get older). Any time you have acne past your mid 20ís, its not hormonal.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 10:34 AM   #5
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith007
It is normal for your acne to change, as you get older. I also heard that most jaw line acne is hormonal acne (which means you will get rid of it as you get older). Any time you have acne past your mid 20ís, its not hormonal.
I'm sorry, but as a woman and one who's searched for over a decade (14 years) to figure out WHY I have acne all over my face, body, etc, I can tell you that if you DO have acne past your mid-20s it's definately without a doubt hormonal. Once again, acne is usually hormonal because it involves hormones in order to develop in the first place. So if you have chronic acne, 10, 20, 30 or more years and you aren't allergic/irritated by anything, it's hormonal.

If I sound harsh, I do apologize, but the problem is that most people don't understand acne and how it develops and will turn around and continue to misinform people. Even my dermatologist used to tell me that my acne was hormonal (just never told me what hormones). When you go through puberty your body is just full of........what was the phrase "raging hormones". Teenagers have a lot of it, especially androgens & IGF-1 which are what most acne fighters work against.

That's right, most acne fighters, especially prescriptions, work by inhibiting androgen activity in the body and/or skin. So if acne wasn't hormonal, than why do a large number of acne sufferers run to using Accutane something that is without a doubt an androgen antagonist. It binds IGF-1 (promotes skin cell growth, thickness, & sebum production) which comes out in the presence of androgens & promotes inflammation, but it also very slightly reduces your androgen production (more so for females), blocks 5-alpha reductase (enzyme used to create DHT), and 3-alpha dehydrogenase (enzyme used to creat 3-alpha diol G from DHT), thus further decreasing the need for IGF-1.

Of course there's the other possibility of bacteria and inflammation (which hormones can also cause), but if you get closer to the root of the problem, the androgens, then you wouldn't have to worry about bacteria overgrowing in a clogged pore, because the pore wouldn't be clogged in the first place. ;-)


Quote:
Clin Dermatol. 2004 Sep-Oct;22(5):360-6. Related Articles, Links


Acne and sebaceous gland function.

Zouboulis CC.

Department of Dermatology, Charite University Medicine Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

The embryologic development of the human sebaceous gland is closely related to the differentiation of the hair follicle and the epidermis. The number of sebaceous glands remains approximately the same throughout life, whereas their size tends to increase with age. The development and function of the sebaceous gland in the fetal and neonatal periods appear to be regulated by maternal androgens and by endogenous steroid synthesis, as well as by other morphogens. The most apparent function of the glands is to excrete sebum. A strong increase in sebum excretion occurs a few hours after birth; this peaks during the first week and slowly subsides thereafter. A new rise takes place at about age 9 years with adrenarche and continues up to age 17 years, when the adult level is reached. The sebaceous gland is an important formation site of active androgens. Androgens are well known for their effects on sebum excretion, whereas terminal sebocyte differentiation is assisted by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands. Estrogens, glucocorticoids, and prolactin also influence sebaceous gland function. In addition, stress-sensing cutaneous signals lead to the production and release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone from dermal nerves and sebocytes with subsequent dose-dependent regulation of sebaceous nonpolar lipids. Among other lipid fractions, sebaceous glands have been shown to synthesize considerable amounts of free fatty acids without exogenous influence. Sebaceous lipids are responsible for the three-dimensional skin surface lipid organization. Contributing to the integrity of the skin barrier. They also exhibit strong innate antimicrobial activity, transport antioxidants to the skin surface, and express proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Acne in childhood has been suggested to be strongly associated with the development of severe acne during adolescence. Increased sebum excretion is a major factor in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris. Other sebaceous gland functions are also associated with the development of acne, including sebaceous proinflammatory lipids; different cytokines produced locally; periglandular peptides and neuropeptides, such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone, which is produced by sebocytes; and substance P, which is expressed in the nerve endings at the vicinity of healthy-looking glands of acne patients. Current data indicate that acne vulgaris may be a primary inflammatory disease. Future drugs developed to treat acne not only should reduce sebum production and Propionibacterium acnes populations, but also should be targeted to reduce proinflammatory lipids in sebum, down-regulate proinflammatory signals in the pilosebaceous unit, and inhibit leukotriene B(4)-induced accumulation of inflammatory cells. They should also influence peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor regulation. Isotretinoin is still the most active available drug for the treatment of severe acne.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=15519139[/url]


Quote:
Pol Merkuriusz Lek. 2004 May;16(95):490-2. Related Articles, Links


[Hormonal factors in etiology of common acne]

[Article in Polish]

Bergler-Czop B, Brzezinska-Wcislo L.

Katedra i Klinika Dermatologii Slaskiej Akademii Medycznej.

Common acne is steatorrhoeic chronic disease, to which specific is, among others, the presence of blackheads, papulopustular eruptions, purulent cysts and cicatrices. Such hormonal factors belong to elements inherent in etiology of the affection. Sebaceous glands have cell receptors on their surface for androgens. In etiopathogenesis of common/simple acne, a decisive role is played by a derivative of testosterone, i.e. 5alpha-dihydrotestosteron (DHT). However, some experts are of opinion that there is no correlation between the increased intensity of common acne and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism. Numerous authors assume, however, that common acne-affected patients may be sometimes subjected to intense reactions caused by sebaceous glands against physiological androgens concentrations. Naturally, estrogens can inhibit release of such androgens. Under physiological conditions, natural progesterone does not conduct to intensification of the seborrhea, but the activity of sebum secretion may be triggered off by its synthetic counterparts. Hormonal etiology can be very distinctly visible in the steroid, androgenic, premenstrual, menopausal acne, as well as in juvenile acne and acne neonatorum. In case of females affected by acne, hormonal therapy should be persistently supported and consulted with dermatologists, endocrinologists and gynecologists. Antiandrogenic preparations are applied, such as: cyproteroni acetate concurrently administered with estrogens and, as well as not so frequently with chloromadinone acetate (independently or during estrogenic therapy).
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=15518435[/url]

Quote:
Clin Dermatol. 2004 Sep-Oct;22(5):398-407. Related Articles, Links


Acne: Topical treatment.

Krautheim A, Gollnick HP.

Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.

Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease, affecting about 70-80% of adolescents and young adults. It is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit.(1) The influence of androgens at the onset of adolescence leads to an enlargement of the sebaceous gland and a rise in sebum production. Additional increased proliferation and altered differentiation of the follicular epithelium eventually blocks the pilosebaceous duct, leading to development of the microcomedo as the primary acne lesion. Concomitantly and subsequently, colonization with Propionibacterium acnes increases, followed by induction of inflammatory reactions from bacteria, ductal corneocytes, and sebaceous proinflammatory agents ().
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=15556726[/url]

Last edited by SweetJade1; 11-29-2004 at 11:56 AM.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 11:37 AM   #6
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Rev Prat. 2002 Apr 15;52(8):850-3. Related Articles, Links


[Acne and hormones]

[Article in French]

Faure M.

Clinique dermatologique, Hopital Edouard-Herriot 69347 Lyon.

Androgens stimulate sebum production which is necessary for the development of acne. Acne in women may thus be considered as a manifestation of cutaneous androgenization. Most of acnes may be related to an idiopathic skin hyperandrogenism due to in situ enzyme activity and androgen receptor hypersensitivity, as also noted in idiopathic hirsutism. Some acne may correspond to elevated ovarian or adrenal androgen secretion. The presence of acne in women may lead to a diagnosis of functional hyperandrogenism, either polycysticovary syndrome or nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Plasma level assays for testosterone, delta 4 androstenedione and 17-OH progesterone and ovarian echography are necessary to determine the possibility for an ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism, but not to better treat acne. The goal of hormonal therapy in acne is to oppose the effects of androgens on the sebaceous gland. Hormones may be used in female acne in the absence of endocrine abnormalities. Antiandrogens (cyproterone acetate or aldactone) may be useful in severe acne, hormonal contraceptives with cyproterone acetate or non androgenic progestins in mild or common acne often in association with other anti-acneic drugs. Glucocorticoids have to be administered in acne fulminans and other forms of acute, severe, inflammatory acne, for their anti-inflammatory properties.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=12053793[/url]


Unfortunately I think the problem is that they don't want to admit that androgens is THE cause. Of course nothing is ever 100% certain, but they have known about the connection for over 30 or 40 years now. For woman, no problem they'll give us a variety of anti-androgens, but for males....good luck! What I've noticed is that males hardly ever see an endocrinoligist let alone will get their hormones tested despite insisting on it, and I think it's because of the fear of becoming demasculinized as androgens is a "male hormone". Usually what happens is males will use androgen antagnonists, such as Accutane (Isotretinion, 13-Cis retinoic acid) or select topicals, that don't emit much, if any, action on total serum androgen production, but mainly affect the skin. Granted there's a few males here that have managed to go on Spironolactone (antiandrogen) and cleared, but yes...something else was altered as result.

None the less, for males the sign of a hormonal imbalance, will be the acne or eventual androgenic alopecia (male patterned baldness) or prostate BPH or cancer (see below). So there really isn't a big push to announce that it's androgens because males don't really show it as easily as women do. Therefore from what I've noticed, if you guys don't use dietary changes to balance your hormones & thus inflammation, you tend to do very well on drugs/supplements that are generally anti-inflammatory (B5, Nicomide, Glucocorticoids, Boswellic Acid, Fish Oil, Guggulipids, Zinc), but some are also androgen antagonists. After all, if you can reduce the inflammation, most acne formation probably wouldn't result...but whatever we do use for this, antibiotics are NOT the solution.

Quote:
Br J Dermatol. 2003 Jun;148(6):1263-6. Related Articles, Links


Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and acne in male patients.

Degitz K, Placzek M, Arnold B, Schmidt H, Plewig G.

Department of Dermatology, Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Munchen, Germany.

Seborrhoea is one pathogenic factor for acne. Androgens induce sebum production, and excess androgen may provoke or aggravate acne. In women an androgen disorder is frequently suspected when acne is accompanied by hirsutism or menstrual irregularities. In men acne may be the only symptom of androgen excess. We report three male acne patients in whom hormonal screening revealed irregularities of androgen metabolism suggestive of late-onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia and who benefitted from low-dose glucocorticoids. Disorders of androgen metabolism may influence acne not only in women, but also in men, and these patients may benefit from low-dose glucocorticoid therapy.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=12828760[/url]

Quote:
Dermatology. 1998;196(1):153-7. Related Articles, Links


Quote:
Other antiandrogens.
Schmidt JB.

Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna Medical School, Austria.

Various substances of steroidal or nonsteroidal structure may serve as an alternative for the antiandrogenic treatment of acne. Compounds with antiandrogenic properties like cimetidine or ketoconazole are rarely administered for acne due to their weak effects. In contrast, spironolactone is an effective antiandrogen that shows good treatment effects in hirsutism and acne. Side effects occur frequently and are dose dependent. Isotretinoin--the most effective agent in acne therapy--has been under discussion for additional antiandrogenic properties for years. At present there is additional evidence for the antiandrogenic effects of isotretinoin. Regarding substances acting on both levels, androgen receptor binding and 5 alpha-reductase inhibition, the question is raised whether the term 'antiandrogen' should be amplified by including the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. This would pay tribute to the biological aspect of antiandrogenicity that takes into account not only the mode of action but also the effects of the substance. Under this aspect type 1 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors may gain attention in the future.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=9557251[/url]

Quote:
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1995 Apr;80(4):1158-61. Related Articles, Links


Effect of oral isotretinoin treatment on skin androgen receptor levels in male acneic patients.

Boudou P, Soliman H, Chivot M, Villette JM, Vexiau P, Belanger A, Fiet J.

Department of Hormonal Biology, St. Louis University Hospital, Paris, France.

An oral daily dose (mean +/- SD, 0.75 +/- 0.05 mg/kg) of isotretinoin was administered for 3 months to six male patients with acne (scores of 4 and 5 according to Rosenfield). The therapy resulted in complete resolution of acne in four patients and improved acne significantly (score 1) in two patients. In accordance with recent findings, no change in serum testosterone and significant decreases in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol glucosiduronate, and androsterone glucosiduronate levels were observed after treatment. Androgen receptor status was investigated in back skin biopsies obtained in acne areas before and after 3 months of isotretinoin treatment. The treatment did not modify the binding affinity constant of skin androgen receptor (0.44 vs. 0.32 nmol/L), but it did induce a 2.6-fold decrease in its binding capacity constant (62 vs. 24 fmol/mg cytosolic protein), as assessed by Scatchard plot and confirmed immunologically by Western blot analysis. These data clearly showed that skin androgen receptor was sensitive to oral isotretinoin administration in acneic patients. The decrease in skin androgen receptor levels (this study) and the recently reported suppression of skin 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone production by isotretinoin treatment appeared consistent with the involvement of androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone in the pathogenesis of acne. Indeed, sebum production is under androgen control, and an abnormal response of the pilosebaceous unit to androgens appears to be implicated in the pathogenesis of acne. These observations were consistent with the absence of sebum in complete androgen-insensitive patients and normal sebum production in male pseudohermaphrodites.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=7714084[/url]


Quote:
Ann Dermatol Venereol. 1999 Jan;126(1):17-9. Related Articles, Links



[Acne in the male resistant to isotretinoin and responsibility of androgens: 9 cases, therapeutic implications]


[Article in French]

Chaspoux C, Lehucher-Ceyrac D, Morel P, Lefrancq H, Boudou P, Fiet J, Vexiau P.

Service d'Endocrinologie, Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris.

INTRODUCTION: Treatment failures with isotretinoin in female patients are frequently related to endocrinological dysfunctions. Such a concept has never been discussed in male patients. CASE REPORTS: An extensive endocrinological work-up has been performed in nine male patients who presented with an acne refractory to conventional treatment and to isotretinoin. Adrenal dysfunction was found in four patients and isolated 5-alpha reductase hyperactivity in 2 cases. Three work-ups were normal. A suppressive treatment in three patients with adrenal dysfunction provided immediate efficacy. COMMENTS: These results would provide insight into the mechanism of refractory acne in men.
[url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=A bstract&list_uids=10095884[/url]

Last edited by SweetJade1; 11-29-2004 at 12:00 PM.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 12:05 PM   #7
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SweetJade1 HB User
Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by sleppy210
How do you know if your acne is hormonal?

Is it natural for your acne to change? Like, I used to get acne in isolated places, now I get tiny little closed comedones all over my face and right under my jawline. Or do taking antibiotics change the type of acne you have?
A few years back, after 3 months on Minocycline, I stopped because it, along with BC & Spiro had only made me 85% - 90% clear. Not to mention, I knew taking it was wrong and one month after stopping, despite the above meds, my acne became the worst it's ever been...even more cystic and breaking out in new areas such as my lower arms & legs. These breakouts were tiny comedones and occassionally even now if I eat too much sugar I'll find a tiny one or two on my arm or leg. So yeah, I believe that it can negatively change the type of acne you get and it may be due to it causing an internal yeast infection within your system. Which means you are more sensitive to sugar because yeast love sugar so until you eliminate the yeast infection you may find that you will continue to have this problem.

Last edited by SweetJade1; 11-29-2004 at 12:08 PM.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 01:27 PM   #8
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Does it matter if it's hormonal or not? Either way, I think most if not all acne can be cured with a healthy diet. I use to have severe cystic acne on my face and back, no periods, and other health problems. I knew my acne was hormonal so I went on diane 35 for a few years and it helped big time but the acne came back when I stopped taking the pill . I thought that maybe what I was eating was causing the hormonal imbalance so I decided to change my diet around. I didn't realize that what I ate could affect my hormones in such a big way. I'm still learning what to eat and what not to eat. I eat mostly organic fruits and veggies and drink lemon water. I think the fruit that helps me most is organic pomelo grapefruit(sweet kind). I eat a huge one daily. The indian soap helps with blackheads and little zits. I have to admit though, it's not easy. Trying to eat foods low in glycemic index and foods that aren't too acidic but so far it's working. My face/back is clear of cysts now except for some scars. I have regular periods, great hair and no dry skin and i'm not taking any pills or medication.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 01:41 PM   #9
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SweetJade1 HB User
Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by cuteypatootie
Does it matter if it's hormonal or not? Either way, I think most if not all acne can be cured with a healthy diet. I use to have severe cystic acne on my face and back, no periods, and other health problems. I knew my acne was hormonal so I went on diane 35 for a few years and it helped big time but the acne came back when I stopped taking the pill . I thought that maybe what I was eating was causing the hormonal imbalance so I decided to change my diet around. I didn't realize that what I ate could affect my hormones in such a big way. I'm still learning what to eat and what not to eat. I eat mostly organic fruits and veggies and drink lemon water. I think the fruit that helps me most is organic pomelo grapefruit(sweet kind). I eat a huge one daily. The indian soap helps with blackheads and little zits. I have to admit though, it's not easy. Trying to eat foods low in glycemic index and foods that aren't too acidic but so far it's working. My face/back is clear of cysts now except for some scars. I have regular periods, great hair and no dry skin and i'm not taking any pills or medication.
Yup, that's correct. I was fortunate enough to know my hormonal situation, but most acne sufferers that go on a diet to improve or clear their skin, usually don't know. Unfortunately until they beleive that acne is hormonal, and then that diet plays a huge impact on our hormone production, most aren't likely to ever consider the diet-acne connection. =/

 
Old 11-29-2004, 01:45 PM   #10
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veggie girl HB User
Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsmith007
Any time you have acne past your mid 20ís, its not hormonal.
But I am 30 yrs old with lumps around my jaw - isn't that hormonal?

 
Old 11-29-2004, 01:47 PM   #11
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetJade1
Unfortunately until they beleive that acne is hormonal, and then that diet plays a huge impact on our hormone production, most aren't likely to ever consider the diet-acne connection. =/
So what foods help stabilize the hormones? I'm a vegetarin - what should I avoid eating?

 
Old 11-29-2004, 02:15 PM   #12
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Quote:
Originally Posted by veggie girl
So what foods help stabilize the hormones? I'm a vegetarin - what should I avoid eating?
If we are talking solely hormones here and not allergies or intolerances (why some of us avoid misc. items), then the following apply:

Grains - Wheat, Gluten, Most Grains or All Grains (the more grains, especially gluten grains in your diet, the greater your ability to produce the hormones & inflammatory products neccessary for the develpment of acne)

"Sugars" - Refined Sugars (table sugar, sucrose, glucose, fructose), evap. cane syrup/juice, brown sugar, brown rice syrup, and especially Corn Syrup - High Fructose Corn Syrup (may respond differently to each type) - Sugars increase hormones & inflammatory products especially HFCS

Fruits - For some people high glycemic fruits may pose a problem (either due to an internal yeast infection or due to the above reasons for sugar)

Dairy - contains sugars, fats, proteins and added hormones that can aggrevate acne. If wish to consume try Goats Milk or Organic Regular Fat Milk, as Skim Milk has recently been implicated in severe acne production (which means it may have more to do with the hormones or whey protein that was added to it) see "High School Dietary Dairy Intake and Teenage Acne" by the American Academy of Dermatology. Of course, you can always try Rice, Almond, Hazelnut, Soy Milks, etc.

Fats - Fried Fats, Saturated Animal Fats, &/or Trans Fats (partially & hydrogenated oils). If frying use Olive Oil as it's more stable and helps prevent oxidation of meats. (these types of fats increase conditions needed to develop insulin resistance which can promote hyperandrogenism, but also are neccessary for the development of inflammatory acne)


Misc. Aggrevators - Caffiene (IGF-1), MSG (IGF-1), Whole Soy & Soy Protein (increases IGF-1 & reduces SHBG), Whey Protein (increases IGF-1)

So for a Vegetarian, you can still be a vegetarian, or a vegan, and have plenty of foods to eat. You just have to pay attention to the type of grains your alcohol comes from, as well as what's in your meat substitues (seitan is wheat gluten) and how much added sugar & trans fats you are getting in your diet. Of course, eat plenty of fiber rich whole foods such as Gluten-free grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, & legumes to help stabilize your hormone levels.

Take Care =)

Last edited by SweetJade1; 11-29-2004 at 02:21 PM.

 
Old 11-29-2004, 05:28 PM   #13
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

Hi Sweetjade1, I suffer with adult acne and abnormal periods and know that it is probably horomonal. I also definitely know that diet plays a big role, but am just recently learning this. Could you give me an example of a days menu? I noticed my acne clearing a couple months ago when I was mainly eating cereal and salads. I have been told that certain cereals aren't good either. With all of this info about what not to eat, I am becoming confused about what I can eat. I'm sorry for my ignorance.
Thank You Cahcinderella

 
Old 11-29-2004, 05:32 PM   #14
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openseason HB User
Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

I just dont see how you are so sure acne is hormonal. Some scientists say it may be a defect in the ways skin cells are shed into the sebaceous oil canal. The cell thickness is about 5 cells thick and the cells break off in a sequential order and are washed out without clogging in healthy skin. But for some people the sequence is wrong and the skin cells shed too fast and cannot be carried out. The skin shedding is caused by an enzyme in the skin tissue. The defect may be in the skin tissue itself, not in the hormones. If sugar is inflammatory it is because it gives the bacteria something to eat. But the oil canal blockage was not caused by sugar.

Last edited by openseason; 11-29-2004 at 05:35 PM. Reason: adding

 
Old 11-29-2004, 06:22 PM   #15
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Re: How to tell: Hormonal Acne

I've been trying to tell the derma this since I started breaking out. I never had severe nor moderate acne It was very mild. I was 20 when I started to take protein I was taking alot of it and I gained a lot of weight this is when the nightmare started I starte to break out quite often and I the acne problems started I was always blaming the protein and the weight I had gained now 25 I recently started to watch what I eat but I'm not too familiar with what I should eat and what I shouldn't, I'm going to visit a nutrionist who suffered from acne that will hopefully help out with my diet. I've lost some weight now and now I'm starting to watch what I eat hopefully this will help.

 
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