It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



ADD / ADHD Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-07-2009, 04:05 PM   #1
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Two Rivers Wisconsin USA
Posts: 3
chris46 HB User
adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs took him off with no side affects other than much better mood

 
Old 09-07-2009, 08:30 PM   #2
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Thunor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 547
Thunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

I'm not entirely sure what you're asking here, I'm guessing you had a son that weighs 175 pounds and was on Adderall XR. You stopped the meds and his mood improved, and you want to know if he was on the right dose?

Unfortunately, height and weight doesn't necessarily determine the right dose of stimulant meds with ADHD. I'll agree that there will be a tendency for larger people to require larger doses, but there is no hard and fast answer. With ADHD, we're short on neurotransmitters in our brains, and depending on the severity of the shortage, our dose will change, regardless of our physical size.

Was your son diagnosed ADHD, or was he taking the med for another purpose? What dose was he on? Did he have mood issues while on the med all the time, or only late in the day? For how long did he take the med? Each of these questions may help us determine what was up in your son's case.

Last edited by Thunor; 09-07-2009 at 08:32 PM. Reason: Once again, I should never use quick reply.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 09-08-2009, 11:35 AM   #3
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Two Rivers Wisconsin USA
Posts: 3
chris46 HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

You answered my question regarding weight.
My question is: My son started on Adderall at age 7 and he is now 20. He is in tech school and most of class experience is now hands on. He doesn't have to sit still and focus anymore like in High School. He wants to go off. We noticed over the last year that he is more agitated than he ever was. He took himself off last week cold turkey which his doctor did not want. She wanted to wean him by 5 mg per month. over a 6 month period. He has been in such a better mood. He actually sleeps now. He could run for two days without sleep. He is still on Welbutrin...which she gave him to counteract the rebound. That his has been on since age 12.
Am I imagining things or could he be less agitated and is there danger to him stopping abruptly? He says he doesn't feel much different as far as focus..just feels like he is in a better mood. He is more talkative than when on the meds. Doctor would disagree, I'm sure. Not sure how to handle this, yet he is an adult and he will do what he will.

 
Old 09-08-2009, 06:44 PM   #4
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Thunor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 547
Thunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

I'm going to be difficult and ask a couple of more questions. What was your son's Adderall dose when he decided to quit? Had his dosage of Adderall or Wellbutrin changed in the past year?

I'm going to do my best to explain what I think is going on, but I want to establish right out of the gate, I am not a mental health professional; my understandings and opinions are those of a layman only. As a warning, I tend to oversimplify and speak to what I feel to be the lowest common denominator, don't be offended if I cover something you already know or if my description is slightly different from yours.

I asked about your son's dose because it sounds like it was too high. The med should cause increased focus, awareness and processing speed, but should fall short of making one feel a 'high' or inhibiting ability to interact. A good, yet imperfect analogy is that one cup of coffee can wake you up in the morning or perk you up, while 5 cups of coffee can make you jittery and short tempered. Anyone I encounter that is complaining of agitation or sleep problems, I generally advise that they lower their dose.

I don't know how much information you have about the meds your son is/was on, but the interaction between the Wellbutrin and the Adderall may have contributed to his issues, and may be a factor in his continuing ability to focus.

First, Adderall is a stimulant medication, consisting of 'mixed amphetamine salts.' In a nutshell, stimulants do exactly what you would expect them to do, they stimulate the brain and the Central Nervous System. The effect that Adderall has that is relevant to ADHD is that it causes the secretion of additional supplies of the neurotransmitters Dopamine, Norepinephrine and to a lesser extent Seratonin. Neurotransmitters are chemicals responsible for carrying messages between the neurons that make up the brain and the central nervous system, not enough neurotransmitters and messages can be lost in the mix. In the most general of possible terms, Dopamine tends to be associated with satiety, it makes you feel good or satisfied. This tends to be what's released when an addict gets their fix. Norepinephrine seems to be associated with self control, too much norepinephrine may be behind the 'zombie like' feeling some get on Adderall and other stimulant meds.

Second, Wellbutrin is a Dopamine and Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Once released, the body tends to break down most neurotransmitters somewhat quickly, Wellbutrin blocks the breakdown and reabsorption of the above neurotransmitters, thereby increasing the supply.

As a result of the interplay between the effects of Adderall and Wellbutrin, it may well be that your son was in a situation where he was overstimulated. Too much of one or both of the neurotransmitters that these meds act on can cause the jitters, the agitation or the lack of engagement with others. It is possible that he would have been best served by a simple modification of the dose of one or both of his medications.

On the other hand, it seems likely to me that the reason that he hasn't lost his focus since stopping the Adderall is the Wellbutrin. The Wellbutrin is acting to stabilize the neurotransmitter supply, and it will shrink more slowly than it would otherwise, this effect has softened the blow that he likely would have felt coming off Adderall without the Wellbutrin. The problem is that despite the soft landing, he may find that his focus begins to suffer as his neurotransmitter supply reaches its Adderall free levels. He may also find that the Wellbutrin alone is enough to do the trick.

A couple of notes. I do not believe that your son is any physical danger from the cessation of the Adderall. The concern his doctor has is likely the 'crash' that one can experience when the Adderall is gone. You and your son are probably aware of the Adderall 'crash' already, because it sounds like that's why the Wellbutrin was prescribed in the first place. It's important to remember that the body and the brain become somewhat dependent upon the extra neurotransmitters, and as his supply begins to dwindle, he may find that he feels depressed and extremely tired. These sorts of feelings are the type that may indicate suicidal potential, and I'm certain that this is what his doctor had in mind. However, I feel that the Wellbutrin should make his transition more tolerable. I would not recommend stopping the Wellbutrin for at least a couple of months to ensure that he's not hitting himself too hard.

I feel that, at this point, your son is better off without the Adderall. My reasoning is his sleep. Regular, high quality sleep is extremely important to both the body and the brain, and if the Adderall was interfering with his ability to sleep, then he was likely in more danger from the lack of sleep than from the discontinuation of the med.

I would recommend that you monitor the situation. Talk to your son regularly to judge how he's feeling, physically, mentally and emotionally. If your son finds that his focus begins to erode over time, consider returning to Adderall or another stimulant med at a smaller dose. Start at the minimum possible dose and step up slowly over a matter of weeks until he can find a dose that gives him the focus he needs but without interfering with his sleep.

Best of luck.

 
Old 09-08-2009, 07:51 PM   #5
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Two Rivers Wisconsin USA
Posts: 3
chris46 HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunor View Post
I'm not entirely sure what you're asking here, I'm guessing you had a son that weighs 175 pounds and was on Adderall XR. You stopped the meds and his mood improved, and you want to know if he was on the right dose?

Unfortunately, height and weight doesn't necessarily determine the right dose of stimulant meds with ADHD. I'll agree that there will be a tendency for larger people to require larger doses, but there is no hard and fast answer. With ADHD, we're short on neurotransmitters in our brains, and depending on the severity of the shortage, our dose will change, regardless of our physical size.

Was your son diagnosed ADHD, or was he taking the med for another purpose? What dose was he on? Did he have mood issues while on the med all the time, or only late in the day? For how long did he take the med? Each of these questions may help us determine what was up in your son's case.
He started on Ritalin as a child. He was on 20mg am and 10 at 4pm. As he got into the teen years his doc felt adderall would be better. She had him on 30mg xr and then decreased him to 25 hoping to wean him. He had ADHD major. He was born to a mother who was addicted to prescription drugs. His birth father had ADHD as a child. We got him as a foster child at 9 months and adopted him at age 3. He was always very active. School was tough on him because he just couldn't sit. He did well on the meds. He did have the rebound with ritalin and that's when she put him on wellbutrin. It wasn't as bad with the adderall. He has been off about 5 days and today he was extremely tired and very hungry. He said he thinks maybe cold turkey isn't the way to go. First few days were fine but he hates feeling so tired and hungry all the time. Yet his mood is good. Not sure the best way to go off the meds. Have read and there are several opinions. How long is recommended for weaning off usually?
He is not hyper active anymore as he is 20 but he still has to be very busy 24/7. He still has a hard time sitting still...always on the move. I am not opposed to keeping him on...just concerned about elevated blood pressure and long term affects of being on a stimulant drug. Insurance does not like to pay for this med.

 
Old 09-08-2009, 08:55 PM   #6
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,274
addprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

Chris,

I can't stay out of this exceptionally intelligent exchange. I'll do my best to maintain the standard.

Lack of sleep or poor quality sleep causes attention problems in everyone and exponentially worsens the attention deficit experienced by those with the named disorder of ADHD.

My best guess at the sequence that ended in your son's improvement follows: His change to an environment requiring less attention enabled his Adderall discontinuance. The resulting sleep improvement alleviated his agitation. Your son is a smart young man. I congratulate him.

I never experienced more than a low level headache with some manageable lethargy for a day or so after an abrupt amphetamine cessation. I think that typical yet acknowledge many experience far worse withdrawals from therapeutic doses. On the other hand, I've experienced brutal withdrawals from SSRI's and I'm told that NSRI (Wellbutrin) withdrawals are more brutal. Warn your son so that if he does cold turkey the Wellbutrin he'll understand why he has lightning bolts zapping his brain.

My wife extended the time for my reply by insisting I watch an act on America's Most Talented. I rated most of the acts so far in the range of mediocre to good. The girl, Paula Pedulla, my wife made me listen to, blew out what's left of my brain. Paula is a Sarah Brightman class singer. She has no serious competition for the win. Tonight she went from housewife amateur singer to super star. Mark my words.

Thu, are you going for Doctor of Psychiatry degree? Your posts give me that impression. I'll have to start thinking before writing for embarrassment avoidance reasons.

Bob

Chris you got in a post I haven't considered before gettin this one off. My wife caused the sychronization problem.

Last edited by addprogrammer; 09-08-2009 at 09:03 PM. Reason: Sinking up.

 
Old 09-08-2009, 09:18 PM   #7
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Thunor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 547
Thunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB UserThunor HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

Leave it to Bob to find a way to make me blush, sheesh. Seriously though, if I every get my ADHD under control enough to make it happen, I'd love a PhD; my chosen science being Criminology/Sociology with a focus on Religion and hate groups. I am, however, rather discouraged at the moment on the ADHD front. However, as I am often wont to do, I digress.

Chris, I wouldn't put him back on the full Adderall dose if you can help it. Start small, 10 or 15mg to soften the blow and wean from there, maybe a week at each dose, stepping down 5mg at a time. Ultimately though, it's up to how your son feels, if he needs to step back up to 30mg and wean down, so be it. There is going to be some lethargy during the process, but it should improve.

 
Old 09-09-2009, 11:58 AM   #8
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,274
addprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB Useraddprogrammer HB User
Re: adderall xr dosage for 175 lbs

Thu,

You cracked my up with your "rather discouraged at the moment on the ADHD front." At the moment my ADHD beast is tied up, caged, encased in concrete, and sits at the bottom of the Saskatchewan near that humongous mall you boys built up there in the tundra. ... AT THE MOMENT. Tommorow? Hell later today? We just might flip flop. I'll be whinning and crying over my ADHD beating snot out of me while driving my shrink nuts trying to get more speed which we both know doesn't help. And your ADHD will be at the bottom of the Susquehanna (six miles down the road from me).

Are there any constants associated with ADHD? Yep, there is. Otherwise we would not have been able to write an ADHD definition.

I became buddies with my psychologist. It so happens he majored in computer science before he switched to brain debugging. Son-a-gun I spent more time advising him on computer technology for his office than he spent debugging my head. And I got no discount, nothing off his hourly $90 nor any renumeration whatsoever for all I taught him on my dime. But I loved every minute and benefited fully because of the large source we share for metaphors, illustrations, similys, gories, and ottomottopedics.

We agreed that the number of variables gives the appearance that ADHD is without rhyme or reason. For sake of argument, say both you and I are short ten pounds of dopamine and 5 short on the norepi. Will we experience the same degree of attention deficit? A big hugh Noooo. You arn't a geezer yet. You live in the arctic. Now I'm cracking myself up. I do know your not quite that far north. And as that book I recommended says, we do not share the same developmental history.

Where are the constants?

The big constant is we both have an attention deficit. Its degree may vary and we may not deal with it in the same way. Nevertheless we both got attention problems. Yeah, a constant.

Thunor you helped me discover a method that consistently helps everyone with ADHD despite all the variables. Yeah, another constant.

Do you remember when I asked you how you can write so well with a brain that appears at least as buggy as mine. Mere curosity was not behind my question. I was begining to suspect we used the same method with the same good results but in somewhat different endeavors.

The past couple day I've produced many pages of English documenting the reasons why I'm choosing the program structure I think best for this project's specific purpose. A few English versions have already resulted because I saw that some parts didn't fit. A revision got them in. And without a doubt I'll find more flaws as I implement the plan. Is the planning time spent worth it?

A software company wanted to know the same thing. The company gave two programmers with about equal skills the same specifications for a program to be written. They told one programmer to immediately start banging out code. The other was told to plan his work first. He was to complete his plan before writing code. Not surprisingly the one who went right at it without "wasting" time quickly took the lead. Three months later the other programmer who planed first had his project completed and tested reliable. In about a year, that is nine months after planner's project was up and running, the non-planner submitted a program with more bugs than my brain.

I've been using the planning trick in my work for years. Planning helps everyone produce better work in less time. For us with ADHD, planning puts us in the same productivity class as those without the deficit. Zero planning has always turned up zero productivity my case. The shame of shames on me: I never saw the cross over to more productivity in anything I want to do.

This past weekend I needed to replace a face board under my house's front gutter. The gutter leaked and the board rotted. I planned this simple project first before going at it. The planning stage enabled me to see several potential problems before encountering them. Even little things like gathering the tools I needed before I went up the ladder saved me time. I haven't done much of this type work. Inexperience can break things that weren't broke with needless loss of time and money. Hours were saved because I didn't do some things I would have done without my plan.

Planning is a skill that like all other skills takes time to master. Learning planning skills will reduce the time it takes to learn all other skills.

Chris, I hope you can use this to help your son. Learning planning skills is part of all effective ADHD remediation therapies.

Bob

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Started taking adderall yesterday... sleeping a lot lilbabyphat0408 ADD / ADHD 15 02-23-2009 03:54 PM
Help with Adderall XR, really need advice JRock123 ADD / ADHD 3 02-05-2009 03:33 PM
how much is too much adderall allyson86 ADD / ADHD 3 07-20-2008 11:42 PM
Going crazy - can't cope with boyfriends adderall Jolia ADD / ADHD 2 09-22-2005 07:29 AM
My Neg. Effects Of Adderall...anyone Get These? KawaiiiGal ADD / ADHD 13 07-09-2005 08:34 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Adderall
Amphetamine
Concerta
Metadate
Methylphenidate
  Prozac
Ritalin
Strattera
Wellbutrin
Zoloft




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



addprogrammer (94), janewhite1 (90), Thunor (48), marisuela (15), iluv (10), addventurous (10), Administrator (9), LessStress38 (9), CharBerry (6), Wootton (6)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1166), MSJayhawk (1000), Apollo123 (898), Titchou (833), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (758), ladybud (747), sammy64 (668), midwest1 (665), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:22 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!