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Old 01-30-2013, 07:12 PM   #1
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What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers, learning disability people avoid? I don't want anything that would make it worse.

Thank you for this info

 
Old 01-31-2013, 07:33 PM   #2
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

gr.

There are a slew of meds, both OTC and prescription that worsen ADHD symptoms. Heck, some of them CAUSE ADHD-like problems. I avoid OTC cold meds like Bubonic. I also have had problems SRI's (antidepressants). Weigh the risks, i.e., the side-effects, against the benefits. It is a good policy before taking any drug.

regards,
Bob

 
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Old 02-02-2013, 01:19 AM   #3
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

What Bob said.

Also, I would recommend avoiding alcohol at all costs, its effects and after-effects make ADHD symptoms much worse.

 
Old 02-02-2013, 07:27 AM   #4
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

That is odd, Alcohol doesn't make my symptoms worse. I rarely drink maybe once a year. Those time I over did it a Christmas & New Years never made my symptoms worse. (Note, I never passed out for the record & I remembered what happened).

 
Old 02-03-2013, 04:52 AM   #5
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

Nevertheless, alcohol is a depressant which acts to limit the activity of the same parts of the brain that are impaired by ADHD. As such, alcohol and ADHD work to reinforce one another.

 
Old 02-03-2013, 06:12 AM   #6
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

gr,

Alcohol converts to glucose faster than any other substance. Explains why "a few cold ones" do the job after a hard workout. Also explains its ADHD effacacy. Getting a buzz on once a year won't hurt you. Enjoy. More frequently? Beware - it'll bite you back bad. Mess your ADHD head worse - much worse.

Trust me. I know from experience.

Bob

PS Alcohol goes from stimulant to depressant not long after imbibbing. Pancreas shoots out a load of insulin to drop blood glucose. The effects of the drug alcohol (a depressant) take over.

 
Old 02-03-2013, 08:24 AM   #7
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

I am confused. Aside from Alcohol. I have heard that stimulant medication has the opposite effects in people that have ADD/ADHD & I also heard that sedative medication has the opposite effects in people that have ADD/ADHD

Is that a myth? If so, I am surprised the PBS program would say that.

 
Old 02-03-2013, 09:05 AM   #8
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

gr,

Both ARE myths.

I don't have the time now to support my assertion. Apparently PBS did not have time to support their assertion. Research it for your own benefit.

Bob

 
Old 02-03-2013, 03:57 PM   #9
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

Actually, there is a disagreement on that. I have read that prescription drugs effect ADD/ADHD users differently the non ADD/ADHD prescription drug users. This is from the medical community. Since the medical community can't decided, I just leave it at that.

 
Old 02-04-2013, 08:06 AM   #10
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Re: What prescription medicine should adult ADD/ADHDers avoid?

There is often confusion regarding ADHD and how it responds to various medications.

Although what follows is an oversimplification, for the sake of this discussion, ADHD is defined by a lack of activity in the prefrontal cortex of the brain. This is the part of the brain that is responsible for, among other things, impulse control and concentration. Stimulants act to increase the activity system-wide, which naturally increases the activity of this part of your brain. As this portion of your brain becomes more active, your capacity to control your impulses and to concentrate increases, which leads to an observed calming effect.

Likewise, depressants decrease activity system-wide, which decreases the activity of the prefrontal cortex; your ability to concentrate and control your impulses decreases, and an observed stimulant effect results, as ADHD individuals are more likely to act out.

It's important to realize that in each case, the stimulant or depressant effect is observed, not real. Stimulants and depressants work on ADHDers the same way they do everyone else, but because of the preexisting deficit that is ADHD, the observed effect tends to be opposite of what is expected. This only works so far, of course, more is not necessarily better, as too much of a stimulant will exacerbate symptoms as the system becomes overstimulated. Too much of a depressant will override the increase in impulsiveness as the body and brain begin to shut down, resulting in decreased activity. The are, of course, several other factors that figure into this situation as well, including sleep deficit and diet, as if the stimulants you're using are necessary to provide a reasonable level of wakefulness, the ADHD benefit is diminished.

Further confusing things is the paradoxical effect of some medications in children. Children react differently than do adults to a range of medications, including stimulants. Children often experience a loss of affect (ability to feel emotion) when medicated with stimulants that furthers the observed calming effect. Children also react differently to some depressants, gaining a stimulant effect from barbituates for example, which of course is the opposite of what occurs in adults.

 
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