It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Addiction & Recovery Message Board


Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-30-2005, 03:57 PM   #1
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 320
thghtsreal HB User
The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

My 17 year old son is an oxycontin/oxycodone addict. He started on oxy when he was 15 years old. Life has been hell for those two years. Sometimes it gets worse, and sometimes there is a HOPE that things will be better, but it never really gets better. In fact, the only time it seems better is when he has his oxy fix and is acting like a good boy. Sure, we did the rehab/detox/NA/councelling route again and again. It never worked. Yes, we supported him emotionally and did out best to help him pull out of it.

Like so many of you who are living the hell of life with an addict, our family was in constant turmoil because of our son's addiction. Not only are you worried about the addict you love, but when you live in the same house with them, you have to watch helplessly as they self-destruct. We have other younger children and it made their lives difficult too.

The addicts lie to you, they steal from you, they fight with you, they manipulate you, they run away and cause you worry. It is depressing and exhausting. Their disease is a heavy weight 24 hours per day, seven days per week. You find yourself adjusting your schedule due to their problem, such as giving up vacations so that you don't leave them alone at home, or taking off of work due to the trouble they get into, etcetera. Their addiction take no vacations. Of course, the addict is on vacation as he/she blissfully floats along on their drug induced high letting you pick up the mess, but for the rest of us, it is horrible.

Well, a couple of months ago, our son was arrested and found to have a sizeable amount of oxy on his person. He has been in jail ever since. We did not bail him out.

What I want to tell you is that life does not have to be so crazy. I want to empower those of you in this situation with the knowledge that life really IS better without the addict. Most of us are tied to the addict by love and we don't have the courage to either do tough love or to simply get away from the drug addict spouse or kick the drug addict child out of our homes.

As much as I love my son and wish the best for him, I have to say honestly, that the time he has been in jail has been a God-sent for our family. We now have a peace we have not known for years. I feel like we are living in a "leav It to Beaver" world. Of course, having a teen-age child in jail on a felony charge is not normal, but our lives seem very much more normal than they have been in a long long time. Our son's addiction really was a devil among us making our lives miserable. Our son will get out soon and I feel a bit guilty to admit that none of us are looking forward to his return. If we could be assured that he would not be back on drugs, it would be another story, but we know that his love for the drugs is stronger than his love for us and we have a great deal of foreboding.

So the point is, if you are a parent or spouse, or significant other of a drug addict who is making your life hell and you can't seem to get the courage to break away, let this be a message of hope. You don't have to let their drug lifestyle choice drag you down.

Put some distance between you and the addict.

In the end, it will probably stop enabeling the addict and help them make better choices too.

God bless all of you suffering with drug addicted loved ones and may God protect those addicted to these poisons.

Last edited by thghtsreal; 06-30-2005 at 04:18 PM.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 06-30-2005, 09:46 PM   #2
Inactive
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 180
herbal HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

He's your son for Chrissakes. He is a human-being just like you!

 
Old 06-30-2005, 11:46 PM   #3
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 320
thghtsreal HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Quote:
Originally Posted by herbal
He's your son for Chrissakes. He is a human-being just like you!
Yes, he is my son and I love him very much. When he is on drugs, however, he is not the son I knew. He is someone else. Virtually nothing about him reminds me of the boy I raised.

We still need to support the addicts emotionally.

Sadly, addicts destroy more lives than their own. Having an addict in the house causes enormous stress on the rest of the family. The stress can cause parents to divorce. It can cause health issues with other children in the house. It nearly always causes financial stress on the whole family with legal fees, rehab fees, theft, etcetera. At some point, the families of these addicts have to protect themselves.

Victims of these addicts know that they need to go the route of tough love, but they don't have the courage to do it.

My message is that tough love not only helps the addict, but can also save families. There are two positive outcomes of tough love. One is for the addict, and the other is immediate relief for the families.

 
Old 07-01-2005, 04:18 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 225
Nervous Nellie HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

As the mother of an addict, I have to agree with you. I am the single mom of two teenagers, the older one is 18, he's the addict, and my younger son is 16. During the time that the older son lived with us he literally terrorized his younger brother. He stole from him, wrecked his belongings, took everything of value from him including bicycles, CD players, guitars, cash...it got to the point that my younger son installed his own lock on his bedroom door. That was the last straw for me.

To live like a prisoner in your own home, to constantly go to your purse and find all your money gone (I used to sleep with it right next to me, but he still managed to steal from me), to find all the faucets in the house have lost their mesh filters (to make bong pipes) and you go to brush your teeth and get squirted in the eye, or every hurricane lamp or glass bottle or jar is missing, to make drug paraphenalia. Every pen in the house was gone...those were used as parts of the bong pipes too.

The fridge was a nightmare. There was a birthday cake in there for my older son and he must have literally gouged it out with his bare hands and eaten the entire middle of it during a munchie attack. Food would be left down in the basement, rotting cheese, milk, dishes, etc. I'm amazed we weren't infested with cockroaches or worse.

His bedroom looked like a crack house. It got worse and worse. The mesh screens in the windows began to disappear, doors and walls were getting punched in, he was skate-boarding in the house with his friends, my floors and walls were getting destroyed. I'd go to my closet where I kept my prize banjo ($600) and it had disappeared. Each and every time I left the house, some further damage would happen.

I worked every day and eventually persuaded my employer to allow me to work from home because I couldn't leave the house unattended. Trying to concentrate on my job and deal with my younger son's pain and my older son's destructive behaviour was making a mess out of me.

Now, I'm sure you're all wondering, how did things get so bad? Well, like most folks, we tried EVERYTHING and I mean EVERYTHING, to help my son for years. Drug rehab, counselling, psychiatrists, doctors...punishments, rules, regulations, curfews, clear and conscise expectations. We did everything by the book and then some. Nothing worked, he was completely and totally OUT OF CONTROL. We were becoming afraid of him...very afraid of him. We even tried a group home for wayward drug addicted kids. When he was high, he was a monsterous stranger that no one recognized. We even considered military school, boot camps, etc...but we don't have those facilities here anymore. We used to, but due to budget cuts, he'd have to go to the States to get into one of those regimented facilities. I begged my local politicians for help. I told them that I really needed help for my son, but I was told he was a 'gap kid'...between the ages of 16 and 18, there wasn't much available for him.

When I finally kicked him out, hoping he would shape up and appreciate coming home and learn to live in our home and respect it and us, instead, he would break in through windows, jimmying locks, smashing glass...he'd sneak in and hide in the basement, higher than a kite. One day I heard a noise in the basement and I saw the busted back door and I thought it was an intruder. I was terrified. I called 911, the cops burst in and it was my son. They could see he was half out of his mind and they decided to bring him down to the station. They put him in the back of a cruiser (without cuffs) and left him alone there for a few minutes. Next thing you know, there are 5 police cruisers all in front of my house, with cops running around everywhere. He had kicked out the back window of the cruiser and fled. Smashed glass everywhere on the road. It was a scene out of the "keystone cops". It would have been funny if it hadn't been so sad. Now he had really done it, because he damaged police property.

Anway, I could go on and on and on...but it's making me too emotional, all I can say is that there ARE times, there really are, when you just have to say ENOUGH, no matter how much you love your son.

Nell

P.S. As most of you know, his last time in drug rehab was for about 6 months and when he got out, we set him up with his own apartment, got him skills training, helped him find work, he lived right above my apartment, I was available 24/7...if he wanted to talk at midnight I was there for him. We gave him every possible chance for support, encouragement and love. This time, he walked away after a couple of months. Left the apartment trashed, and just walked away. He's 18 now....I won't be getting anymore notices from the cops when he's arrested....

Last edited by Nervous Nellie; 07-01-2005 at 04:28 AM. Reason: add PS

 
Old 07-01-2005, 05:28 AM   #5
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 320
thghtsreal HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Nervous Nellie, our experience is so similar, it is almost spooky. Our younger son also was the victim of his older brother's theft and meanness. The younger son got a safe for his belongings and woke one night to find the druggie son shaking the safe to see if he could open it. My wife slept with her purse. We changed our credit cards, cancelled out checking account, put all our valuables in a safety deposit box, took videos of all our good for insurance purposes. Maybe it is a good idea to do this anyway, but in our case we knew that the thief was our very own son living right in our house.

We had the rotting food in the basement just like you from our older son's filthy late-night eating.

It ruined my career because I could never sleep. The kid was always up - running around the house and sneaking out of the house to do drug deals. He would sneak strange people into our house late at night when we were sleeping. I was constantly up chasing him. I would tell him to go to bed or at least stay in his room, but of course, he would not obey any rule of courtesy. When we put pressure on him, he simply would run away for days at a time while we worried that he might be dead in a ditch somewhere. Then he would return as if nothing would happen and the devil would be back INSIDE our house.

We became afraid of our own son too and had our younger son sleep in our room to keep him safe. In addition to smashing up the house, I saw our druggie-son punch our dog in the face when the dog came up to him to greet him. Not only are we afraid of our son, but we are afraid of the people he associates with. We are afraid of retaliation from pushers, or people he may owe money to.

herbal's statement that "he is a human being just like you" is not correct. He is not like me. He might be human, but he is not civilized. He USED TO BE a wonderful, beautiful human, but after becoming addicted, he really stepped away from the human race.

The people who say that you have to "forgive and lovingly support the addict" are either addicts themselves or people who have never lived the nightmare. Love? OK, yes, I love him and I would grieve if/when something bad happens to him, but I can't let him destoy my life. I can't let him tear up the lives of our other family members. I have a responsibility to protect my family and right now, the druggie is the biggest threat to our safety and well being.

Last edited by thghtsreal; 07-01-2005 at 05:32 AM.

 
Old 07-01-2005, 06:31 AM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 98
amaranthine HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Good for you, thghtsreal. There would probably be fewer addicts in the world if parents, friends, spouses didn't bail them out time after time. Just because you love him does NOT mean you have to clean up after his mistakes!

As a young woman, I cannot tell you how many people I've seen throw their lives away to drugs because their parents came to the rescue every time they found themselves in trouble. I've never so much as touched a drug in my life, and its because my parents would have called the police themselves if they thought I had any drugs on my person. They practiced tough love, and it was for my own good!

Good luck dealing with his arrival home, and I hope for his sake and yours he will now turn over a new leaf!

 
Old 07-01-2005, 06:31 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 225
Nervous Nellie HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

From your posts (I've read every one of them) I know that you have truly tried everything, just like I did. You are the first person I've met though, whose addicted child has exhibited such similarly destructive and frightening behaviour. I can so relate to your career needing to take a back seat while this was going on, and I hope that you can get back on your feet in that regard. I know it sure as heck affected my career, and like you, I was the bread-winner and also had an obligation to protect my younger son.

Hearing that your younger son had to sleep in your bedroom to keep him safe just brought tears to my eyes. I know I sound very emotional, and in fact I am. My own doctor said I was likely experiencing a form of post traumatic stress (PTSD) from the ordeal that lasted for such a very long time. But like you, I didn't want to give up. I did take Effexor XR, an anti-depressant, for about a year so I could function afterwards. But hearing your own story brought back all the scary and miserable emotions that I thought I had put to bed.

I know we could BOTH go on and on about all the reason why we just CAN'T let that happen again. I made a promise to my younger son, that he was going to be safe and that I would NEVER let his older brother hurt him again. I am determined to keep that committment.

My younger son has been severely neglected during these years of ordeal on many
levels. It's only NOW, that he's starting to talk about himself more and how the experience really affected him. It's only NOW that I'm realizing that the "good son" was so concerned with not adding to my stress that he swallowed a lot of his own needs. That was so unfair for him, but I was truly blinded by the addict who seemed to absorb ALL my attention and energy ALL the time. I do feel a tremendous amount of guilt because the question is always "how could I have let this happen?" The only way that I can live with that guilt is to ensure it never happens again. My younger son is of just as much value as my older one. Why does the squeaky wheel always get all the grease?

Thank you for sharing your experience. It helped me enormously to know that I'm not alone. Because I only have the two sons, I sometimes think that if I only had the younger one, I'd think I was a good parent. If I only had the older one, I'd think I was a bad parent.

I love my older son very much. I want him to recover. I want him to get better more than anything in the world, yet I am not equipped to do this all by myself. He needs to help, and he's not willing to right now. Please never feel guilty for feeling that sense of relief that he's not abusing your family, because in my mind, that's exactly what he was doing. How many people must you sacrifice for the addict? How many of their lives have to take a back-seat to his? It just can't work that way.

I know that you're not a cold or hard-hearted person and neither am I. If there was a way to help our kids, we would, but it can't be at the expense of the entire family's happiness, safety and peace of mind. It just can't. Perhaps if I only had the one son, I would wind up giving him all my money and resources and then I myself would wind up living on the streets. I dunno. I just know that I can't put my other son in this danger anymore. It's just not right.

Nell

 
Old 07-01-2005, 07:35 AM   #8
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 242
joanharvest HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Thghtsreal,

You give very good advice. I have a 24 year old son who at the height of his addiction was doing 320 mg of OXY's( prescribed by a Dr.) and 10-15 bags of heroin a day. I was fortunate because he never stole from me or frightened me. Through it all he was as repectful to me as he always had been. He was able to manipulate me through his sweetness. The day I found his heroin stash and flushed it down the toilet--45 bags of heroin, I also flushed his prescription of OXY's. He never said anything, just stood there. He even tried to give me a hug afterwards. He's been clean ever since, 6 months. I just hope if he does use again, I can be as tough as you. I know I'll have to be. I have to give you credit for not caving in like so many parents do. My son is the excuse man. He has an excuse for everything. He hasn't reached his bottom yet so I fear he will use again. If he does I HAVE to go through with my promise of kicking him out of the house.

 
Old 07-01-2005, 01:06 PM   #9
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Houston, TX USA
Posts: 296
toomany HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

I backslid big time regarding my son. I'm not offering any excuses or defending my actions, I'm just telling you what happened.

My 22 year (or will be on Tues) old addict son. Who has been in treatment several times starting at age 18 and now lives in a halfway house was arrested night before last.

From last treatment center in December he to halfway house where he lived for almost 3 months, relapsed, got kicked out, I took him to another halfway house, he wanted to go back to previous halfway house but had to have 30 days clean to get back in. I let him come back home, he abused his psych meds (which were prescribe by last treatment, he was never on meds before) and I had to take him to the ER. He got back into halfway house after 30 days, lived there for 4-5 weeks, said it was too expensive and moved to a new halfway house. The guy he relapsed with also lived there too so I knew it wasn't good. OK..shorten... He was arrested night before last at a corner store for stealing alcohol. I picked him up from jail. He was still very high from all the Xanax (not prescribed to him). I picked him up, and he called halfway house and found out he was kicked out so I gave him a list of shelters and halfway houses and told him to call. He told me he was going to kill himself and didnít want to live anymore. We talked for a while and I told him he still needs a place to stay so he called one place and they told him he could come in the morning. We drove over and looked at that outside, he seemed OK. So, I brought him home with me. He told me he still wanted to kill himself again and we talked some more. He seemed OK. He told me he was going to shower and went in the bathroom and cut his wrist with a kitchen paring knife. I didn't hear the shower so I went it and found him. He was still standing and I wrapped it up and called 911. Horrible, horrible wound. They stitched the best they could and he was taken to a different psych/treatment center via ambulance.

I am angry at a number of things. He was not on psych meds before last treatment. He is now letting himself be turned into a mental patient. I'm angry at him for that. I'm resentful at the psychiatrist from the first hosp for putting him on so many meds and telling he would need them for life for a mood disorder. I don't doubt that he needed an a/d but mood stabilizer on top of mood stabilizer, treating this adverse reaction with even more medication was wrong! He twitches and trembles now from meds side effects. I'm sure the new hosp and drs are going to continue the med trend. It is like a bad dream where you try and scream and nothing comes out and no one can hear you.

The night he got arrested, his friend called me at 2:30AM and told me he thought Chris might be in jail. I didn't get up and try to find him right away. I laid in bed for 4 hours and then got up and tried to find. He had no money, no ID, he lost that a week or so ago. I was in agony when I called the jail and they didn't have him. I was worried he was lying in a ditch half dead or being torchered by pyschos who offered him drugs/alcohol as an inticement, etc. Then he calls and I was so relieved to find out he was in jail. I wish they would have kept him until he sobered up. I don't believe he would have cut himself if he had been sober. I don't know if things would have been worse or better if I hadn't picked him up from jail yesterday morning. I did call someone in the program who advised me not to pick him up. I did what I thought was best instead. I just wanted to get him back to the drug infested halfway house, lol. I'm sorry for the whining. I need to find a sponsor. I have an AA sponsor and she suggested that I talk to more people in alanon, those who have been where I am.

I am going to meetings, I just started 2 months ago, I also go to meetings for my own addiction/alcoholism.

I spared you the additional drama that went on with other family members over this latest event.

Thanks,
Patty
__________________
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last edited by toomany; 07-01-2005 at 01:11 PM.

 
Old 07-01-2005, 02:47 PM   #10
Inactive
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 1,113
kerry1 HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Quote:
Originally Posted by herbal
He's your son for Chrissakes. He is a human-being just like you!
You sound like someone who's never lived with an addict.

 
Old 07-01-2005, 03:33 PM   #11
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 242
joanharvest HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Patty
I am sure physchiatrists help some people but they didn't help my son either. He ended up on depakote, lamictal, 10 mgs of time release xanax a day, klonopin, and oxycontin and moved onto heroin on his own. He threatened suicide once and I called the police who put him in a physch ward for a week. The police found pot on him so he had to go to court when he got out of the physch ward. The physch ward scared the **** out of my son. Once I found the heroin he was willing to get off everything. It took almost 5 months to wean him off almost everything after he went cold turkey from the heroin and Oxy's. He still takes one klonopin a day. He feels really good right now. He seems relieved to not have to count the hours until the next pill.

If my son uses again I will have to kick him out for good. I hope it doesn't come to that.

This must be very difficult for you. There are a number of other people going through this same thing with their sons right now on this board. Keep writing. It does us all good and gives us the strength to do what we have to do.

 
Old 07-02-2005, 04:45 AM   #12
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 320
thghtsreal HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

TooMany: What a terrible experience you have endured with your child trying to commit suicide. No parent should have to experience that fear and pain. The fact that you can experience that and carry on truly shows your strength. I hope you have faith in God to help you through this. I am praying for you.

Mental ill-health and drugs seem to be tied at the hip. Many drug addicts seem to have mental health issues and drug abuse seems to cause or enhance mental health problems. Unfortunately, when mental ill-health and drug abuse are mixed, the results are devastating.

Your sonís doctor should have made absolutely certain that your son had made a full recovery from drugs before putting him on prescription psychotic medications.

Those of us who love an addict and are victims of the madness fear the results of the addictís self-destruction. We fear that the addict will commit suicide (many addicts either talk about or try suicide). How many of you have addicts that also do self-harm like cutting or burning? The scars constantly remind you of the possibility of suicide. If it isnít suicide, we fear that they might overdose or be victims of murder. We also worry that the addict would not take care of their basic needs if we left them alone Ė that they would lay down in a slush puddle and die from the elements.

These fears keep us shackled to the madness of living with addicted teens, adult children, spouses, parents, etcetera.

One thing is for certain; drug addicts are big dark suck-holes that will absorb all the time, emotion, money, and resources you can pour into them.

So, what do you do when you love a drug addict who also has mental health issues? The two seem to be inseparably mixed.

I have great sympathy for people with depression and mental ill-health. However, I have zero tolerance and zero sympathy for drug abuse. Mental illness is a disease. Drug use is a choice. Saying that drug abuse is a 'disease' is a cop-out and an insult to all who truly are afflicted by real diseases that they did not chose.

Drug abuse repels all attempts to address mental health issues. When a person is abusing drugs, talk therapy is useless and drug therapy is dangerous. Thus, in my opinion, a drug abuser with mental health issues is a drug user first and a psych sufferer second.

Until the drug user stops using and is 100% sober, trying to address the mental health issues are absolutely useless.

We all know that for the loved and the forgotten, for the rich and the poor, the cure for the addict remains the same; the pain of addiction has to outweigh the pain of getting clean. The addict is the only person who can pull themselves out of it. We have to allow the pain of their choices force the addict to change.

At the same time, we have to protect ourselves and our families from the giant black sink-holes that addicts create around themselves. We cannot allow ourselves to be sucked into that abyss and be victimized by our love for the addicts.

Last edited by thghtsreal; 07-02-2005 at 04:53 AM.

 
Old 07-03-2005, 07:44 PM   #13
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Houston, TX USA
Posts: 296
toomany HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Joan and thghtsreal,

Thanks so much for the support. I need it.

Take care,
Patty
__________________
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
Old 07-27-2005, 02:24 PM   #14
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3
zott HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Thank you so much thghtsreal, I will carry your post around as my mantra. I am married to a bi-polar meth addict. It is very confusing at times as to what the real issue is. I have filed for divorce and moved him out. I have great compassion for the mental illness and no tolerance for the drugs. He is currently in re-hab, mainly to keep his job. I try to stay strong but it is sometimes hard. I've told him many times that I cannot make his life choices but I sure can make mine.

 
Old 07-27-2005, 02:38 PM   #15
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 320
thghtsreal HB User
Re: The joys of NOT living with an addict - a message of courage

Quote:
Originally Posted by zott
I cannot make his life choices but I sure can make mine.
Zott, yours are some of the most brilliant words I have read in a long time.

Good luck. Your life will improve with every step forward you take. Hup two, three, four!

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Clean Living???? narzew Addiction & Recovery 12 08-08-2008 10:55 PM
Living w/ an addict enabler06 Addiction & Recovery 7 04-30-2008 06:05 PM
methadone addict Ryan_ct Addiction & Recovery 36 12-10-2005 10:04 PM
should i date a recovering heroin addict? stasiaface Drug Interactions / Side Effects 10 04-19-2005 09:06 AM
HELP...Vicodin addict, being held hostage uniquelyme Addiction & Recovery 11 04-14-2005 06:27 AM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Hydrocodone
Lortab
Methadone
Oxycontin
Percocet
  Tylenol
Ultram Valium
Vicodin
Xanax




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Phoenix (150), katlin09 (108), reachout (100), Wendy88 (36), second go (36), oxygirl (34), corissa3 (32), Tysmom1 (24), icehouse3z (24), bolter (21)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1013), Apollo123 (909), Titchou (856), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (763), ladybud (755), midwest1 (670), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:27 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!