It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-24-2006, 07:35 PM   #1
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 644
wmkcolors HB Userwmkcolors HB User
extreme verbal aggression...

Has anyone had experience with a male relative, with dementia, who has/had become extremely verbally aggressive? My grandfather is in his 90s, with advancing dementia. He knows me, but he cusses at the caregivers. He calls them unspeakable names, and, due to the dementia, there is no reasoning with him. He takes some meds, for dementia, but I don't think they help. I just want to know if anyone else has had a similar experience, with aggression, and how did you cope? Thanks.

Last edited by wmkcolors; 11-24-2006 at 07:36 PM.

 
Old 11-24-2006, 09:34 PM   #2
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 205
georgie04 HB User
Re: extreme verbal aggression...

Hi, WM, will a female relative do ?

We went through this for about eight months with my SIL. She did it to her caregivers, she did it to the only two family members who take care of her (including me) who she trusts totally, she did it to people (including children!) walking down the street, to television repairmen, to people of certain ethnicity, and to dear, loving and loyal friends. She could not help it one bit, I could see that - it was like a chemical reaction in her brain. I have a theory that some of it was caused by stress (but then all AD patients by definition are under huge stress in my opinion).

I think there are others here who have experienced it, and managed to solve/manage it through medication. I personally know someone whose father went through this (he was a dear, sweet gentle man for 70 years until then), and had it transfer into physical aggression against caregivers, with some pretty serious consequences.

With the benefit of hindsight (DUH), I would not put up with it for one minute, nor would I expect any paid caregiver to (it had a devastating effect on me, and especially on one of her caregivers who had been with her for ten years).

Administering drugs to subdue/manage behaviour is one issue; expecting people to put up with extreme verbal abuse (and, in our case, death threats) is another. I would get his doctor to do a medication review - if he is taking things that don't help - ditch them, and if there are things that may help, try them.

With my SIL, this behaviour switched on, and then it switched off. It may be only a temporary phase for your grandfather too, but I would strongly recommend that you manage it as (medically) aggressively as you need to, so that you can maintain his care.

From what I remember you have tried and done everything to make your grandfather's situation safe and happy (doesn't happy sound like a ridiculous word under the circumstances?). Maybe I am getting hardcore on this issue, but I don't see a reason for (seriously) negatively impacting other people's lives (in terms of verbal abuse) just to let this ghastly disease run it's course. Your grandfather would never want to be doing this, and he wouldn't thank you for letting him.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 11-24-2006, 11:35 PM   #3
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 644
wmkcolors HB Userwmkcolors HB User
Re: extreme verbal aggression...

Yes, it is stressful. My brother, his legal guardian, has put up a multiple camera system, to monitor him, from a distance, when he is extemely agitated. My grandfather is a wealthy man, so, he can afford to have the best of care at home. My brother, nor I, want to take advantage of our position, by putting him into a nursing home, so, basically, we're bringing the nursing home to him. It is his money, and his request was to never be put into a nursing home. My brother will always honor this. My grandfather has 24/7 care and is continually being monitored. He's had to be put into seclusion more, due to the aggression, and, when he's taken out, a relative or caregiver is always with him. I'm not sure what other meds the doctors might try. I know in a nursing home, he'd be just as aggressive, if not more so, or they'd be sedating him, just to keep him under control, according to what our doctor says. The caregivers with us, have experience, working in nursing homes. We have group meetings and journal each shift, so, we have a support system, but, as a relative, I feel so bad, when he curses and yells. It's hard to not feel sorry all the time.... I guess I'm probably stressed out the most, in the group. My grandmother and mother both passed away, so, I'm struggling to become the matriarch. I just want to hear other stories of people who've experience their loved one, being verbally aggressive. Thanks for your responses.

Last edited by wmkcolors; 11-24-2006 at 11:41 PM.

 
Old 11-25-2006, 03:23 AM   #4
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,518
angel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB Userangel_bear HB User
Re: extreme verbal aggression...

Sometimes a short 'burst' of anti-psychotic medications can assist in curbing the aggression .. ask the doctor about that .. Serenace or seroquel can be used short term ... respiradol is another longer term anti-psychotic. Anti psychotic meds aren't recommended in high'ish doses for long periods of time because they do simply stop working and create other behaviors.

Also, make sure that med's aren't reacting with each other .. is he on anything new?

goodluck, aggression is scary and intimidating ..

Cheers

 
Old 11-25-2006, 06:19 AM   #5
Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 404
janeslk HB User
Re: extreme verbal aggression...

Quote:
Originally Posted by angel_bear
Sometimes a short 'burst' of anti-psychotic medications can assist in curbing the aggression .. ask the doctor about that .. Serenace or seroquel can be used short term ... respiradol is another longer term anti-psychotic. Anti psychotic meds aren't recommended in high'ish doses for long periods of time because they do simply stop working and create other behaviors.

Also, make sure that med's aren't reacting with each other .. is he on anything new?

goodluck, aggression is scary and intimidating ..

Cheers
My FIL has been on seroquel and respiradol for almost a year after he became violent. It is rather frightening how docile he became. Of course, he was on two or three other drugs as well. They are weaning him off some of the drugs now. He is still docile, but very much aware of his surroundings and seems quite content. While it was scary to see him so quiet and sleepy all the time, it was scarier to see him raging, yelling and striking the nursing staff.

Jane

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Discharged for Aggression ronmac Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 12 03-05-2010 09:24 PM
Input on verbal abuse thatgirltoo Relationship Health 11 09-23-2008 08:25 AM
extreme concern Jess22 Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 9 02-24-2007 09:42 PM
Depo Provera and Aggression??? willo1980 Women's Health 2 05-23-2006 11:13 AM
A rambling blurb on my own aggression ignition Anger Management 2 07-31-2005 04:43 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Aricept
Aspirin
Ativan
Morphine
Namenda
  Reminyl
Risperdal Seroquel
Xanax
Zoloft




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Gabriel (742), ninamarc (157), Martha H (124), meg1230 (93), angel_bear (68), jagsmu (55), Beginning (51), TC08 (44), ibake&pray (43), debbie g (37)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1136), MSJayhawk (941), Apollo123 (857), janewhite1 (823), Titchou (773), Gabriel (743), ladybud (667), sammy64 (666), midwest1 (655), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:51 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Copyright and Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!