It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-23-2012, 01:00 PM   #1
Registered User
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bedminster, NJ
Posts: 142
Suzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB User
Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Just when you think everything has settled down, dementia throws another one at you!

My aunt now has a persistent delusion that she has died. This has endured for over a week now and they are very concerned about it because they are concerned it could be a serious psychotic delusion.

It appears to be related to that part of the brain that recognizes faces, and sure enough, in the last two weeks, she did not recognize herself in the mirror, but at first we did not realize it, we thought she was speaking "rhetorically" when she said, I don't even recognize that person, or I don't even know who that is looking back at me (referring to her change in appearance with not being well.) We had no idea she meant it literally!!

This is causing her great agitation and unhappiness, because she thinks we are not laying her out properly, that no one is sending flowers to her wake, that no one came to her funeral, and that we are not burying her properly. She is also not understanding why she should eat or drink anymore and she thinks the nursing home is actually purgatory.

Occasionally she pops in and out of this, but for the most part, she believes that she is dead. This is not your garden variety "I dreamt I died" type of thing.

The psychologist has said that a delusion which is causing her pain, we should not just go along with and we should not go along with this one because it could cause her to not eat, as well as the emotional pain it is causing her. She also said that my aunt's delusions overall have gradually become more bizarre as opposed to non-bizarre (this being a clinical use of the terms) and hopes this is not going to develop into a genuine "Cotard syndrome".

The psychiatrist is coming back on Tuesday to make an evaluation and to probably prescribe new medications.

And, the administration wants to meet with me on Friday to see where we are at because they may not be the right facility for her if she continues to have serious psychotic delusions. The thought of having to have her move is a dreadful one! But apparently there was a ruling in late November about some of the antipsychotic drugs being used in dementia patients (such as SeroQuel and maybe others), they can encounter a citation for using them or are not allowed to use them... need to do more research on that. But they said due to this ruling, they are more limited in what anti-psychotic drugs they can use.

Just wondering if anyone else has experience of this particular delusion.

And PS, yes, among all this some people are still saying "this is normal for an old person" and complaining about her phone. WhatEvs. I am so no longer worried about that.

Last edited by Suzy0513; 01-23-2012 at 01:08 PM. Reason: additional information

 
The following 2 users give hugs of support to: Suzy0513
aras (01-24-2012), ninamarc (01-23-2012)
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 01-23-2012, 04:47 PM   #2
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Delusions are not uncommon but I can say this is the first time I have heard of one believing they were already dead. I have seen them believe many other bizarre things though. My Dad was convinced for months that "they" were killing hogs down the hall. He was very concerned as to how they handled the meat so it would not be spoiled. It was the basis for much of his wandering and distress as well. We did use Anti psychotics to help with the delusions and it was beneficial.

I am wondering what the "professionals" want you to do about the delusions? To the patient these are REAL! There is no amount of talking that is going to convince your Aunt that she is wrong. Reality orientation was a technique back in the 80's that was proven not only ineffective but harmful to the emotional well being of the patient. Redirection may work in the moment but it doesn't change her basic belief. Yes, it is probably caused by the deterioration of her brain but there could also be an environmental component that is prompting her to believe this. Something as simple as funeral flower arrangements in the facility. But probably because of the disassociation because of the progression of her dementia. You also need to realize that as the disease progresses this will tend to diminish as the disease progresses and be replaced by something different. Dad's was a result of his A-fib and oxygen deprivation in the brain. After the Hog killing delusion we had the delusion that his brothers were in danger.

Cortard Syndrome... also known as Walking Corpse Syndrome... is nothing more than having the delusion of being dead. It varies from mild to sever.... and the recommended treatment is with anti psychotics, anti depressants, and mood stabilizers. It is just a one of many many different delusions that they damaged brain will create. I don't see it as any more dangerous than any other delusion.

As for the use of anti psychotics in a care facility... There are recent efforts on the federal to curb the use of a-typical anti psychotics in a care facility setting for patients that do not have a diagnosis that warrants the use of these medications. It doesn't say they can't use them... they just have to use them appropriately. Many of the diagnosis which indicate the use of these a-typical anti psychotics are present in the demented mind. So unless there is some state law... all you should need is the mental health diagnosis that warrants the medication. Any other claim by the facility (baring state law that I don't know about) is to me a cop out Yes, dementia patients can legitimately be diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar, manic, or any other psychiatric diagnosis. The root cause is the dementia but the manifestation is a psychiatric diagnosis.

It all goes back to the "black box warning" and over use of the medication by some care facilities. Yes, some facilities do over use the medications so they don't have to deal with the residents. They medicate for behavior which is not a good thing. Yes, there is a very small danger of cardiovascular events if these medications are used in the elderly... but the main factor in cardiovascular events increase is AGE! Some go too far one way and some go too far the other..... and somewhere in the middle there is proper use of the medication.

If your Aunt was a healthy 30 year old with these delusions it would be disconcerting. But she is an elderly lady who is suffering from a progressive degenerative brain disease for which there is no cure or treatment. Delusions of being dead, killing hogs, or anything else are all disturbing and emotionally painful to the patient. I do believe they need to be treated and right now there is nothing else to treat them with except the a-typical anti psychotics. So what do you do?

I will be interested in what the psychiatrist says (hope he is a geriatric psych specializing in dementia behavior) and what the facility says.....

Love, deb

 
Old 01-23-2012, 05:34 PM   #3
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
ninamarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada/USA
Posts: 1,703
ninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

The delusional thought that my FIL had was that he wanted to die or that he thought someone is going to kill him in the hospital... He never liked the hospital so one day the hospital scared him finally. He said everyone is trying to kill him like mercy killing just because the orderly in white uniforms moved him upstairs to be observed overnight for medicine purpose.
Ever since then, he spent almost a year on this - either someone will kill him or he will die somehow... He came home and asked us where was the burial place! Later on he would tell the caregiver he was 100 years old and waited to die in the yard/wanted to die... Somehow he mixed it up betweem being killed and wanting to die.
This lasted quite a long while until he moved to the nursing home. The home gave him antidepressant and now he does not talk about it anymore.

For your aunt to think that she is dead must be horrible to you. If she is dead, why would she be talking! This may have to do with her idea of dying and etc.

I sure hope she won't move out of this place. If the doctor means the hospital or psychiatric ward or the like, then it is worse! Is this a home for memory impaired or a unit for dementia?
If it is AL, for sure she needs to go to a locked unit for dementia. If she is already in the dementia unit, it is better that she stays...

Hope the doctor will find a way out to help her.

We were surprised too when my FIL talked of death. It is just something he made up in his own mind...

Keep us posted,
Nina

Last edited by ninamarc; 01-23-2012 at 05:41 PM.

 
Old 01-23-2012, 09:11 PM   #4
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

It is not unusual for them to talk of death, have paranoia about death, or even express the desire for death. Much is due to the damage to their brains and much is due to their surroundings. Many times they are in a facility (nursing home or hospital) which is for the sick and dying. They are unable to comprehend what is going on around them. Their brains confabulate what they perceive and come up with possibilities, such as death. Those that they perceive as acting strangely feed their paranoia and they come up with killing. Many talk about wanting to die. Life is strange, incomprehensible, and for many unbearable. Death wishes follow. My Mom talked about wanting to die and it was not delusional or paranoia. It was her honest emotional feelings about having this disease. She would rather be dead than have Alzheimer's. That is a rational thought for some.

In this disease with the disassociation, not recognizing where you are, who is there, or what is going on, you can see where they might perceive they are in purgatory. Life is a fuzzy blur of moments that are disconnected. It can be much like a dream state... or what you might imagine purgatory would be like. You get there by dying... it's rational in a very irrational way but that is the demented brain. She may be wondering why others don't understand that she is dead and acting accordingly. The more I think about it the more I can understand how this can be. It is always fascinating to me to step into their world and try to understand how they view the world.

We have a lady in Mom's facility that lives in her delusions most of the time. She is not harming anybody and most of the time is ok with her delusions. Delusions themselves is not something to be terribly concerned about because they are part of the disease... unless they become extremely upsetting to the patient. That is when you need to intervene with medication. We can't expect the demented brain to function normally

Love, deb

 
Old 01-24-2012, 03:44 PM   #5
Registered User
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bedminster, NJ
Posts: 142
Suzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

The psychiatrist has been excellent so far, and yes, she did prescribe new meds of the anti psychotics, anti depressants, and mood stabilizers variety.

They explained to me that the main reason they are concerned is that my aunt is already only 88 pounds (healthy she was only 95 and only 84 when she checked in), and this particular delusion could cause her to think she does not have to eat, which could actually push her into wasting (which is definitely a less pleasant way to die). They had been tailoring her diet over the past months to get her weight up and keeping her active physically to keep her muscle tone (well, muscle tone after a fashion, as much as is feasible) because from the start they were afraid of wasting. Her directive says no feeding, so our only hope is to get her to eat naturally. A few days of not eating and she has seemed to lose a few more pounds. We are NOT forcing her but they wanted us to understand what the ramifications of her not eating could be (in other words, to not just say cavalierly, hey, she doesn't want to eat, she doesn't eat).

Also, I should clarify that they did NOT encourage us to try to convince her that she is alive but rather to simply refrain from agreeing with her outright that she is dead, in the hopes of getting her to eat by any means. Along the lines of "wow, after you are dead, what a surprise, you still have to eat". And to give her empathy and let her talk about how she is feeling, just don't agree outright.

 
Old 01-24-2012, 04:01 PM   #6
Registered User
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bedminster, NJ
Posts: 142
Suzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Hi there. I responded to the above posted - YES they feel this delusion is harmful to her due to her low body weight and the potential resulting lack of eating.

The psychiatrist did prescribe her a new med cocktail.... wish us luck!

I realize now the confusion I was sensing was not that the facility did not want to prescribe them, but that the regular doctor (geriatric MD) thought they were needed but did not want to prescribe them himself, he preferred the psychiatrist to do so - which she immediately did. Probably a situation of deferring to the psychiatrist and also wanting to be extra careful of the regulations, etc.

My aunt has delusions most of the time (still thinks she is in a bank) and although they are getting more and more strange, they are usually harmless, but this one, as I posted above, they felt was dangerous.

She often expressed a wish to die, or looking forward to the relief of dying, and asking to die... all of which we did think was her real feeling about the matter and consistent with what she had said all along. So that part we do not find delusional at all.

And YES I can easily understand the chain of logic that could get someone in a nursing home or AL dementia unit to think they are in purgatory. In a way they are!!! (Said with no disrespect to the patients or the facilities, just to their situation).

One thing we found strange in this delusion was that she continues to recognize US, her aides, the nurses, her visitors... and to call us by name (usually the right ones) but does not recognize her own face in the mirror.

If I am next to her in the mirror, and she can see both our faces, she will recognize me, but not herself. She will ask who that other person is and then get annoyed that the other person is "copying" her. She herself asks to go over to the mirror to put her lipstick on :-) then gets confused and reaches over to feel for where her reflection should be.

Yet she does recognize pictures of herself (even recent ones with her current appearance that were taken at Christmas and are posted on her bulletin board).

Strange indeed.

Wish us luck with the new meds!!

 
Old 01-24-2012, 05:01 PM   #7
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

This is absolutely a strange disease. I can understand the eating issue. Any time somebody is that thin their eating is critical. Mom is 98 pounds now so I do understand. Every bit has to be calories filled and we have to encourage as many bites as possible. Eventually they have nothing but muscle mass to lose. Mom's Hospice diagnosis is actually "failure to thrive". Yes, I can see where any delusion that might cause her to refuse food is not a good thing.

I am glad there was confusion about the medication. I do hope it helps. It sounds like you have it as well under control as it can be

The mirror problem and who they recognize can be amazing and random. We finally covered Dad's mirror because that "man" was upsetting to him. Mom doesn't seem to respond to the person in the mirror. If the lady in the mirror distresses her you might want to just cover the mirror.l

You have my wishes that the meds will work and Mom will eat for you

Love, deb

 
Old 01-24-2012, 05:43 PM   #8
Registered User
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bedminster, NJ
Posts: 142
Suzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Well depending on her height and frame 98 could be not bad or fearfully thin! My aunt is small and slight so 98 would be an improvement. But for your Mom that could already be dangerous!

My aunt has "failure to thrive" lately (before the holidays she was really thriving).

They did cover the mirror and she keeps asking for it to be uncovered :-) They cover it with various things (a pretty poster, fabric, bulletins). After she uses it they cover it again and they keep trying different things to cover it in the hopes she'll forget about it.

When it was covered we found her trying to pick up her reflection in the window to put on her lipstick (she is very serious about her lipstick) :-)

Next step is to ask to have it removed but it is built into the dresser /armoire unit, so we are hoping that this too will pass.

With this it is hard to tell whether you have it as in control as possible or are just playing catch up all the time but we are giving it a college try!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
This is absolutely a strange disease. I can understand the eating issue. Any time somebody is that thin their eating is critical. Mom is 98 pounds now so I do understand. Every bit has to be calories filled and we have to encourage as many bites as possible. Eventually they have nothing but muscle mass to lose. Mom's Hospice diagnosis is actually "failure to thrive". Yes, I can see where any delusion that might cause her to refuse food is not a good thing.

I am glad there was confusion about the medication. I do hope it helps. It sounds like you have it as well under control as it can be

The mirror problem and who they recognize can be amazing and random. We finally covered Dad's mirror because that "man" was upsetting to him. Mom doesn't seem to respond to the person in the mirror. If the lady in the mirror distresses her you might want to just cover the mirror.l

You have my wishes that the meds will work and Mom will eat for you

Love, deb

 
Old 01-25-2012, 07:23 AM   #9
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
ninamarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada/USA
Posts: 1,703
ninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

I hope the medications will help her. My FIL's nurse said the med would make him stop worrying and so he would not feel depressed or anxious.
My FIL thinks this is the place he works - not about death. He does not believe that much in religion as a scientist.
I think it also has to do with the concept the elder has about death. e.g., my FIL knows the pets are put to death in old age or when they are too sick. So he applied that to his own life. I do know if he knows he is like this, he would not want to live but in the mean time he is not like that at all. He is happy in the NH. Back home, he probably wanted to die because there were no peers and no purpose at home.
Yes, often it seems to be their reality and it is real and presented in their own way with the "fantasy" or funny/strange logic.

Sometimes I find it interesting to know how he thought of those fake ideas. e.g., the neighbor's house has to do with his money (like a condo and family.) Once he said he wanted to resurrect his late wife from her ashes. It seems that he applies the stuff he knows in his life and comes up with his own logic/idea.
That is, instead of the resurrection of Christ, he applies it to real people.
I have heard many funny/strange ideas from my FIL.

Your aunt's weight is certainly a factor. I hope she will gain more weight.
If she really wants to go, who can force her to stay? I guess she insists on that.

Again, I hope the med. can stop her thinking like this.

Best,
Nina

Last edited by ninamarc; 01-25-2012 at 07:37 AM.

 
Old 01-25-2012, 02:37 PM   #10
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Suzy... the problem with Mom is the constant weight loss despite efforts to maintain her weight. She is eating. She started off at about 135 pounds and is down to 98. It has been a steady decline with a short period of stability due to Ensure Plus which we had to stop because of diarrhea. Since stopping the Ensure Plus it has been a sharp decline downward. Just by looking at her it is obvious that she has no more fat to lose and at this point is probably losing muscle mass. You can actually see this in her ability to move. She is only 5 ft, and at this point she has no more weight to lose... but continues to lose despite eating.

We didn't have to worry about the lip stick. Mom rarely wore any. She doesn't seem to mind the lady in the mirror either. Dad was the one with the problem. Yep each has their own reaction to what they perceive. Like you I do wonder if we are ever in control... or just running along behind trying to catch up I just try something and see if it works for a while and then try something else. That's all we can do !!

Love, deb

 
Old 01-26-2012, 08:11 AM   #11
Registered User
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Bedminster, NJ
Posts: 142
Suzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB UserSuzy0513 HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

I am so sorry to hear this. Have they tried any of the appetite enhancers such as Megestrol? They tried it with my mom when she was wasting from Lymphoma and it did boost her appetite somewhat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
Suzy... the problem with Mom is the constant weight loss despite efforts to maintain her weight. She is eating. She started off at about 135 pounds and is down to 98. It has been a steady decline with a short period of stability due to Ensure Plus which we had to stop because of diarrhea. Since stopping the Ensure Plus it has been a sharp decline downward. Just by looking at her it is obvious that she has no more fat to lose and at this point is probably losing muscle mass. You can actually see this in her ability to move. She is only 5 ft, and at this point she has no more weight to lose... but continues to lose despite eating.

We didn't have to worry about the lip stick. Mom rarely wore any. She doesn't seem to mind the lady in the mirror either. Dad was the one with the problem. Yep each has their own reaction to what they perceive. Like you I do wonder if we are ever in control... or just running along behind trying to catch up I just try something and see if it works for a while and then try something else. That's all we can do !!

Love, deb

 
Old 01-26-2012, 09:19 AM   #12
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Suzy this has been discussed nd rejected. These are appetite enhancers and her appetite is not the problem. She eats. She had a small salad, cup of chicken and rice soup, 3/4 of an egg salad sandwich, 2 cookies, and ice cream for lunch yesterday. After her fall she had a cheese omelet with grits and bacon. She also get 3 snacks a day along with her 3 meals a day. She eats! Yet she loses weight. I was subsidizing her intake with about 1400 calories a day using Ensure Plus but that caused massive diarrhea which lead to dehydration. Part of the reason for the weight loss is her excessive pacing and the energy she burns constantly moving. Part of it is probably her digestive inability to process all that goes in. Her tendency to have diarrhea leads us to that conclusion. So far we have not found a solution for either. I just keep taking her additional foods she loves along with milkshakes, chocolate, and other high calorie snacks

Love, deb

 
Old 01-27-2012, 08:08 AM   #13
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 36
hillside6 HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

My mom who has been in the nh since july , thinks she is bleeding to death wakes up every morning with this. They wash her and place bandaides on the places she tells them are bleeding. They can't get her not to eat. We have charge meds , provider her with salads and good food instead of mac and chesse or pasta and sauce. She has gained 35 pounds.
She doesn't think she has ate and is hungery all the time.

Everyone is different yet the same.

My Mom is my third parent with this. MIL is the 4th, she still is at home for alittle while longer, she hates me, yet is dependant on me.

At times i wonder if I am sane.

 
Old 01-27-2012, 05:38 PM   #14
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,161
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

I feel your pain Hillside! My Dad had Vascular Dementia and we lost him March 2010. Mom was diagnosed with ALZ in 2006. She is still in a locked unit. My FIL fell over his walker and broke his neck in 2006 (the same day Mom was diagnosed). After 9 months in a halo brace he began having strokes and stroke related dementia. We lost him in August 2009. It was then it became clear that my MIL also had dementia. We lost her in September 2010. Did I mention that my grandmother, who had Alzheimer's, stayed with us on weekends! Sometimes it just comes in buckets full!

Dad was as your Mom. He ate and ate and ate some more. He would get up from the table land within a short amount of time had forgotten he had eaten and want to eat again. He also gained weight. Skinny man... he usually weighed in the 160's ballooned up to 185. But the the disease did it's magic and before he died he was down to about 130 pounds. Mom also gained some before she started her weight decline. My comment is... if they are packing on the pounds now then so be it because they will probably need it later! You are so right when you say each is different. There are many similarities but each manifest itself in a different way.

Love, deb

 
Old 01-28-2012, 07:54 AM   #15
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
ninamarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada/USA
Posts: 1,703
ninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB User
Re: Psychotic Dementia Delusions: Believing you are dead

Hillside, It is good that she is eating a lot. My FIL with severe stage of Alzheimer's does not know he needs to eat. However we can give him food in puree form or soft desserts, he eats them all.
For now, it is good that she can eat it all. I understand this problem: my FIL used to take a whole bag of cookies in his kitchen and "stole" it under the caregiver's eyes and ate too many of them. We had to hide the desserts/cookies in the fridge...
He no longer does this (he stopped doing so in 3/2010).
Keep in mind that she is still eating and it is good!
The imagination of bleeding is from the damaged brain... We can only comfort her and ignore her complaint all day long... Do what we can and there is a limit. My FIL used to say he wanted to die back in 2009 and we ignored him and let him say so. No one bothered him and he waited and waited and it was time for dinner!

Hugs,
Nina

Last edited by ninamarc; 01-28-2012 at 07:54 AM.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Nervous agitation in dementia smileyskid Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 3 03-19-2011 02:45 PM
Dementia and paranoia wlmrfair Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 4 03-15-2011 04:07 PM
Subcortical dementia KaP Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 1 02-24-2011 02:45 PM
Multi Infarct Dementia vs. Alz ebp123 Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 1 12-15-2010 10:12 PM
Can a person have hydrocephalis AND dementia? dcsams Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 79 05-05-2010 08:14 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Aricept
Aspirin
Ativan
Morphine
Namenda
  Reminyl
Risperdal Seroquel
Xanax
Zoloft




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Gabriel (762), ninamarc (157), Martha H (124), meg1230 (93), angel_bear (68), jagsmu (55), Beginning (51), TC08 (44), ibake&pray (43), debbie g (37)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1182), MSJayhawk (1015), Apollo123 (913), Titchou (862), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (763), ladybud (760), midwest1 (671), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:38 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!