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Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia Message Board
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:17 PM   #16
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Re: anyone else experience night visitors?

Excellent advice BB. As soon as you expect there may be a cognitive problem you need to remove any firearms!! I will repeat... do not wait, the minute you suspect there is cognitive impairment of any level please remove all fire arms. If that is impossible then please disable them by removing the firing pin. If you do not know how, a gunsmith can do it in a few minutes. Don't just take away the bullets because they can get more. Disable the gun!

My Dad refused to let go of his mother's pistol. I did convince him to let me bring it home for hubby to clean. While we had it we removed the firing pin. As with BB's dad, during a delusion Dad attempted to fire the pistol. A little precaution goes a LONG way. Later, when the disease progressed I did bring the pistol home and the firing pin can be replaced

It is also a good idea to put knives out of sight and locked up if necessary. Cleaning fluids should also be locked up. Only leave out a daily dose of medication. Bottles should be secured. Remember that they don't remember these items are dangerous. It is better to be safe than sorry...

Don't wait until it's too late!

Love, deb

 
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:48 AM   #17
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Re: anyone else experience night visitors?

Fortunately I am not yet involved with this type of problem. Otoh I learned from a caregiver neighbor last year that "night visitors" are often the result of macular degeneration. He took his Mom to the Opthomologist and sure enough the MD told him it was quite common. I can't recall the name of the disorder but I looked it up on the computer and sure enough there was quite alot of information. Once his Mother heard from the specialist and also was able to hear the description as her son read the information to her she lost her fear. She still has night visitors but she is coping with the "inconvenience
of unexpected company" instead of being fearful of harm. She told him she had been afraid that she would be placed in a high security facility if she was "crazy". Sigh. She is functioning much better now. Acey

 
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Old 11-09-2013, 11:49 AM   #18
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Re: anyone else experience night visitors?

Acey, and one of the reasons there is such a great need for better diagnosis, awareness, and information. There are many reasons for "night visitors" and only with the proper information can we determine how to best handle the situation. If the dementia (this is NOT a diagnosis but a symptom) is caused by Lewey Bodies or some other dementia symptoms, then it is part of the dementia. I could be MC, or it could be sundowning, or it could be... We just have to figure out the could be to know which tactic we need to handle the ensuing behavior. If you used that tactic with one of the dementia causes it may do no good at all.

When a doctor say "You have dementia" and sends you home, the doctor is not doing his job. That's like saying "You have a fever" and sending you home. Yea, we know the symptom we came in with but what is causing it. Only lthen do we know what to do to best treat and deal with the cause. If a doctor looked at you and said "You have cancer" and nothing more we would be furious. We want to know where it is, how advanced, and what we need to do to best treat the condition. I want the same for all dementia patients. Instead we are giving "memory drugs" to individuals that truly need a brain shunt for NPH and anti psychotics to those with FTD where it can be fatal. We are not treating emotional distress or looking for underlying medical problem because we blame it on "dementia". Awareness and education is a must and we need to start with the medical community! So please insist on a real diagnosis and don't settle for less :k getting off my soap box::

Love, deb

 
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