It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia Message Board
Post New Thread   Reply Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-22-2012, 10:25 AM   #1
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Mom won't eat?

Mom was hospitalized for leaky heart valves and surgery is the only answer, but they won't operate because she has dementia, is frail and not a candidate for surgery. Since mom has been hospitalized she is refusing to eat, and drink. I was with her for a while and tried to encourage her. There are times she did take food in but found her spitting it out later, because she had it stored in her cheeks. Is she giving up, or is it the disease?. Yesterday she was released back to the Nursing Home and there is no improvement with her eating, yet she is walking with her walker and is communicating with the nurses? If mom doesn't start drinking and eating she will not be around for long.

 
Reply With Quote
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 11-22-2012, 07:23 PM   #2
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,186
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Dorri, I just went through this with my Mom. The hospitalization your Mom went through is confusing to her. You took her out of her normal routine and familiar territory to a place that is confusing to even us. This in itself can cause a decline in the cognitive abilities. This decline can take many forms.

You mentioned that your Mom was pocketing food. This is common in the later stages. Rarely is it caused by the fact that Mom just decides not to eat. That is a cognitive function that she will not be able to sustain. More common it is caused by one of two problems. She is either unable to swallow or her brain is no longer telling her mouth how to manipulate food and get it to her throat to swallow. You probably need to ask the care facility for a swallow evaluation. This will determine the correct meal texture (regular, mechanical soft, or puree) is right for her. If it is too difficult for her to eat the food offered, she may just not eat it.

Mom started eating less and almost stopped eating the first of this week. I spent two days trying different food and liquid consistencies to see what would work. She would eat cream soup but not ground up chicken. She managed well with mashed potatoes but bread was packed in the jaws. She inhaled ice cream but had trouble with the brownie. When the food hit the back of her mouth in a mushy consistency she would swallow effectively. Her brain is no longer telling her mouth how to manipulate the food during chewing to get it to a swallowing position. So we switched her to a puree diet. I fed her the first puree meal at breakfast this morning and she ate every bite. I stayed for lunch and again she ate almost everything on her plate. Liquids are another problem. Water and juices are actually difficult to swallow because of the tongue action that is needed to get them to a swallowing position. By thickening the liquids they are of the puree consistency and are easier to swallow. You also need to put smaller amounts in her mouth so she can deal with it.... as I had to do with Mom.

If it is a swallowing issue there is not much you can do about it except use the puree and thickened liquid in small amounts and hope she does not aspirate.

The other problem may be that her brain is not telling her that she is hungry. If there are other distractions at meal time she may follow the other distractions and not be interested in eating. Providing a quiet corner and present foods you know she likes may entice her to eat.

My bet, if she is pocketing food, request that the facility test her swallowing abilities and perhaps change to a puree diet.

Love, deb

PS... if she is pocketing food then oral care is imperative. They need to make sure her mouth is cleaned out after each meal to remove pocketed foods. These stored bits of food can quickly cause mouth infections.

Last edited by Gabriel; 11-22-2012 at 07:25 PM.

 
Reply With Quote
The following user gives a hug of support to Gabriel:
dorri (11-25-2012)
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 11-22-2012, 09:21 PM   #3
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Thanks Deb, sorry that your mom is going through this too. It's difficult to watch. I think mom started this when the hospital was giving her meds, she had trouble swallowing some of the bigger pills so she cheeked them instead. I can only imagine that they turned bitter in her mouth as they were dissolving. We would find the whole pill when opening her mouth or parts of it. So they started to crush them and put them in apple sauce and would give her meds by spoon. Somehow that did go down. Then she started storing her food in her cheeks as well, so the hospital did put her on puree, but she would open up the lid on her meal and say "I don't like that, and wouldn't eat. Sometimes when the tray came in, she would say she doesn't want to eat without even looking to see what was being served. She was also storing pureed chicken and beef in her cheek area. The one thing she did like was soups but when they started to puree the soups she quit eating them as well. Think she thought it was a bowl of gravy or something. The doctor ordered Ensure for her, so she was drinking a whole one of that for the first day or two and after that would only take sips when someone offered it to her. She would also take sips of tea, mostly when someone offered it to her by putting it up to her mouth. On the last day of my visit with her, she did eat a 1/4 of her pureed chicken and gravy and veggies by herself. I was so happy but about 5-10 minutes later, she dug out a good tablespoon or more from her cheek area and set it infront of me. While I was there, I was scrubbing her dentures and rinsing her mouth after meals.
They released her back to the Nursing Home the day I left but my sister is there to update us. She said all mom took in the first day was a couple sips of ensure and a spoon of yogurt. I'm really worried about her. She also had 2 falls out of bed yesterday.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 09:40 PM   #4
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,186
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Eating is such a complicated process. We don't realize that because we do it so many times a day but it is. There are the visual cues, smell that triggers hunger sensations, hunger itself, getting the food to the mouth, getting it from the front to the back of the mouth, the chewing process, the swallowing process... and I am sure I have left a few out. At any point this process can be disrupted. I am sure the pills didn't help the situation but I expect that the biggest disruption she has had is the hospital stay itself. It will take her a while to get back to a sense of routine back in the nursing home.

Along with the puree food she may need feeding assistance. Once again feeding one's self is a complicated process that can be difficult for those with dementia. Mom lost that ability some time ago. More times than not the utensils end up on the floor and her fingers in the food. But she rarely gets the food from the plate to her mouth. She would sit there if nobody attempted to feed her.

Remember that each is different. It is a matter of trial and error to find out what they will eat and how. I am sure the nursing home is going to work with her to find out how to get her to eat. Also remember that she does not need a plate load of food to survive. It is amazing sometimes how little they truly do need. If they are getting adequate hydration, a small amount of food can go a long way. So see what happens over the next week or so as she readjust to being back in the nursing home. Sometimes they stop eating for reasons you don't understand and there is nothing you can do about that. At some point you have to believe that what is happening (if you can not change it) is what is supposed to happen.

Ensure or other supplements is a good idea. Just watch for diarrhea. It is a common side effect. Then you have to watch for dehydration. It's always something! I had to take Mom off Ensure because of this side effect.

Love, deb

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2012, 10:06 PM   #5
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Thanks for the tip on Ensure side effect. My mom always had a constipation problem so maybe it will help her to go.

My sister updated me just now and mom has been moved to a private room, so she is really worked up swearing at the nurses and very agitated. They moved her because mom's other room was too small for the extra equipment mom now needs, oxygen, commode etc. Another adjustment for her. Not good.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 10:09 AM   #6
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
ninamarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada/USA
Posts: 1,703
ninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Dorri,

Deb has many good advices for you. Perhaps Mom needs to have pureed food as she may have trouble eating by herself. At this stage, maybe some sedative will help to calm her down. Talk to her doctor about it. My late FIL had had pureed food for a year and half. In the end, it was the eating that really made him weak. When my late FIL stopped walking and used the walker last year in May/summer, he was also mean to the caregivers. In Sept last year, they started giving him sedative because he was combative when it came to toileting. In late stage like this, sedative helps. She cannot understand why she needs help, so she is fuzzy. My late FIL also had oxygen in the last week this past July. He was very weak and didn't really protest or anything. I think the sedative helped.
It is not that she gave up. It is the disease - in late stage, she would not be able to cope with eating and needs to be fed.
Also the demented person hates hospital. So the hospitalization was like a trauma to her. She would decline after that. My late FIL had always declined a bit after hospitalization (he used to be hospitalized once a year for a long while.)
Also a move can make her upset because it is not familiar to her for now. However, the impact should be minor since it is in the same NH.
It is hard in late stage. I understand what you are going through. Lots of worries but nothing you could do to really help... She gets anxious and mad...
You sure she needs commode? Sometimes she needs help to go to the toilet and she would not know what to do on her own. The caregiver needs to help her to go to the toilet. My late FIL used to have it at home before he moved. It worked well in his own room. In later stage, a commode didn't help because he didn't know what to do with it anymore.
I strongly suggest that she tries some sedative so people can help her.

Hugs,
Nina

Last edited by ninamarc; 11-23-2012 at 10:14 AM.

 
Reply With Quote
The following user gives a hug of support to ninamarc:
dorri (11-25-2012)
Old 11-23-2012, 10:48 AM   #7
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ninamarc View Post
Dorri,

Deb has many good advices for you. Perhaps Mom needs to have pureed food as she may have trouble eating by herself. At this stage, maybe some sedative will help to calm her down. Talk to her doctor about it. My late FIL had had pureed food for a year and half. In the end, it was the eating that really made him weak. When my late FIL stopped walking and used the walker last year in May/summer, he was also mean to the caregivers. In Sept last year, they started giving him sedative because he was combative when it came to toileting. In late stage like this, sedative helps. She cannot understand why she needs help, so she is fuzzy. My late FIL also had oxygen in the last week this past July. He was very weak and didn't really protest or anything. I think the sedative helped.
It is not that she gave up. It is the disease - in late stage, she would not be able to cope with eating and needs to be fed.
Also the demented person hates hospital. So the hospitalization was like a trauma to her. She would decline after that. My late FIL had always declined a bit after hospitalization (he used to be hospitalized once a year for a long while.)
Also a move can make her upset because it is not familiar to her for now. However, the impact should be minor since it is in the same NH.
It is hard in late stage. I understand what you are going through. Lots of worries but nothing you could do to really help... She gets anxious and mad...
You sure she needs commode? Sometimes she needs help to go to the toilet and she would not know what to do on her own. The caregiver needs to help her to go to the toilet. My late FIL used to have it at home before he moved. It worked well in his own room. In later stage, a commode didn't help because he didn't know what to do with it anymore.
I strongly suggest that she tries some sedative so people can help her.

Hugs,
Nina
Thank you Nina, it's hard for us so can only imagine what they are going through. As for the pureed food, she is getting it, but she still pockets some of it as well, that is if she even tries it.. When the hospital sent ground chicken or beef, it was dry all though they also sent some some gravy along side of it. Maybe as Deb and you mention it is best for them to work with her to see what she can eat. Maybe she needs her food cooked and pureed with more liquid. She does like soup but she hates it pureed.
Her Nursing Home is for seniors who can function more on their own. I suspect that if mom requires more care after this she will be transferred upstairs where there is a more pallitive care setting.
When she was in the hospital she was put on high doses of oxygen to deal with her gasping and heart problem.. Since the problem was stabalized every time she panics she thinks she needs the oxygen so they are giving her a low dose even though her oxygen levels are more or less normal. She panics and says she is hyperventilating.
Since she is attached to the oxygen, she needs the commode or she gets out of bed with everything attached to her and tries to walk with it to the washroom.. When I was down and she was attached to IV, she just didn't understand that she needed a nurse to disconnect her before we could take her to the washroom. She gets agitated and impatient waiting even a minute. I often had to hold her back before she pulled the IV out of her arm. The difference with her is I would call the nurses in to disconnect her, they or I would take her to the washroom, and we would put her back into bed, tuck her in nicely, and as soon as the nurse left, she would want to go for a wheel chair ride, or a walk, so she had to be disconnected again. We barely had her foot out the door, and she wanted to go back to bed again. It's non stop with her, and if someone runs for her everytime, they get pretty exhausted out. Just ask me, I was doing it.
They did put her on sedation in the hospital because she would get very agitated at night, also less help was on and she would be needing someone non stop. When someone doesn't come running to her when she wants them, she starts flinging her arms, kicking her feet and gets anxious. Problem with Ativan it takes a while to work, so she ends being up when she should be sleeping and then sleeps through a good half of the day when she should be up and is up at night again. The nurse said Ativan works well for her, but it doesn't last.

When my mother was in the hospital, she was okay with the staff outside of keeping them busy, but when she returned back to the NH she is yelling and swearing, almost like she remembers and thinks she can do it there. Apparently she is giving them a hard time.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 11:40 AM   #8
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
ninamarc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canada/USA
Posts: 1,703
ninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB Userninamarc HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Dorri,

Sorry that she is attached to the oxygen all the time. I hope she knows how to use the commode. Also, if she has this adult diaper on her, it will help. In the NH, the caregivers even added another layer in the bed so my late FIL would not wet the bed. He had adult diapers but we could not tell him it was the diaper. If you try to use the pull-up kind of undergarment, it may be helpful and you will have enough time to help her to go to the commode.

Deb did say that Antivan is bad for demented person. Maybe she should try melatonin which is more natural. Deb knows how to do this one. Antivan would make a demented person more upset. You should stop her from taking antivan.

Hugs,
Nina

Last edited by ninamarc; 11-23-2012 at 11:41 AM.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 01:43 PM   #9
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Hi Nina, the one thing that remains with my mom, is her memory to go to the washroom on her own. That was before her hospitalzation but she has been using the commode in H since she's tied up to tubes. She knows to pull her diaper down when she needs to go. She is to be supervised by a nurse, but knowing mom, when she has to go, she will go.

I read you about the ativan.

She was on it before and was taken off because it caused more confusion in her. They put her on something much more potent in the hospital but there were problems with it, so they put her back on Ativan to settle her.
As for the melatonin, the jury is still out on it for safety. With mom's heart condition and leaky valves, I am afraid to try it on her without doctor's approval. Could always mention this to my sis.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 06:10 PM   #10
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,186
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Dorri, everything you have mentioned is typical dementia behavior which is made worse by any move. We think of it as back to the nursing home. In her mind it is yet another strange place. Then a new room on top of that. It is the same as any move. Dementia patients have to be watched constantly when there are iv's or tubes of any kind. They don't remember they are there, walk away and rip them out, or just remove them if they notice them. It takes memory to understand the new things attached to you and they can not do that.

Yes, some dementia patients are very demanding. They are constantly coming up with something they need somebody else to do for them. Mom went through that phase. She wanted to go home, we would get home and she wanted to go back to AL, we would get to AL and she would want to go shopping... and on and on and on. She would want a cookie, then a piece of candy, then a hot dog... on and on and on. I used delay and distraction. I did not do everything I was asked to do and Mom survived I would pick and choose the most important request, or the easiest to accomplish. Then I would keep her busy with something that might grab her attention. I have found that those who demand, many times do it out of boredom. I could stop many of Mom's demands by turning on a full time news channel with closed captioning. She didn't hear the program or understand what they were saying but she could read the words at the bottom of the screen and see the pictures. The other thing that occupied her was a puzzle. I would put together part of it. The outside edges and some other areas were enough. Then she would sit and manipulate the pieces, putting them in the wrong place, happily. You just have to find something that grabs her attention.

If Mom is able to go to the toilet, then by all means the staff should facilitate her continuing as long as possible. As far along as Mom is, if the staff will take her every 3 hours she will go in the toilet staying dry most days. She can no longer communicate with words but she will squirm when it is time to go. She can no longer walk but if you pay attention you have time to take her. She can not manipulate her briefs herself but she will wait for you to do it. Her only accidents are when the staff gets busy and doesn't pay attention or take her often enough. Hopefully your Mom can continue to do this for herself, or even on a schedule, for a long time.

I am not a fan of Ativan. Yes it does work for a few but you have to be very aware of the side effects and after effects. It is a quick acting but short lived calm. In some elderly patients it has the reverse effect causing agitation rather than calming. In other elderly patients it does have a calming effect but the agitation returns quickly, sometimes worse, causing more ativan to be needed. Rather than the roller coaster effect of ativan, there are other medications that work better.

What most people do not understand about Melatonin is that it is NOT a sleeping pill. Naturally occurring Melatonin controls our circadian rhythm. That is the cycle of waking and sleeping at regular intervals. It is a known fact that Melatonin levels decrease as we age. It is also a known fact that Alzheimer's decreases melatonin levels even further. Melatonin is useful, in the elderly, to adjust the sleep cycle. If Mom is up all night and sleeps during the day then Melatonin may help. But the current dosages being used are way too much and used by people as sleeping pills. It is not right for everybody but works well when used as it is intended. Mom was a night walker and her only snooze time was in a chair in the afternoons. I started giving her a small dosage of Melatonin at night. After a few weeks she was sleeping at night. The Melatonin was not putting her to sleep, it just rearranged her circadian rhythm so her body knew it was bedtime

Hope the care facility can get her settle and readjusted to her new surrounding. Give her a while to adjust. Perhaps when her anxiety level is not so high she will eat better

Love, deb

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2012, 06:25 PM   #11
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Thanks Deb.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2012, 08:02 AM   #12
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Mom's heartrate has been shooting way up, she was very agitated and anxious. They now put her on morphine. Hope this is a short term measure.
Her heart rate is coming down and my sister said
she was very normal and slept peacfully. Could her anxiety raised her heart level in the first place? what do you all know about the use of morphine and it's use. Can it be taken long term without side effects?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2012, 08:31 AM   #13
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,186
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Anxiety can and will definitely accelerate the heart rate. It also decreases the appetite, increases respiration, decreases pain, increases strength and many other physical responses. Anxiety causes the release of Adrenalin. That creates the fight of flight reaction that we need to survive in a crisis situation. This is very important to help us survive but it can create problems when we are in a constant state of anxiety. There is validity in the idea that anxiety can cause physical decline.

Morphine not only controls pain but can improve shortness of breath. If your Mom had pain, that can create the anxiety described above. Relieving that pain will decrease the symptoms. So I am not surprised that her heart rate came down and she was sleeping peacefully after her pain was relieved. Remember that they can not tell us that they are in pain effectively. Acting out may be the only way to let us know

Morphine can be used for an extended period. Every medication has side effects! There will be side effects with morphine but if it is proven effective then the benefit outweighs the side effects. It is an addictive medication, but effective when used in a controlled situation. It can be used for a short time to control acute pain or long term to control constant pain. Withdrawal can be eased after long term usage by decreasing the dosage and not stopping immediately. It does causes constipation. The facility needs to be vigilant to make sure that your Mom does not get constipated. I have found this to be the most troublesome side effect!!

Just be happy that Mom was peaceful and sleeping....

Love, deb

 
Reply With Quote
The following user gives a hug of support to Gabriel:
dorri (11-25-2012)
Old 11-25-2012, 09:17 AM   #14
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,129
dorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB Userdorri HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Thanks for the info Deb, as far as we know, mom does not have pain but she is very anxious. She does struggle with panic/anxiety/hyperventilation but which came first is not known? Is her congestive heart causing the panic? or is the panic on it's own causing her heart rate to go up and making her heart condition worse?
Yesterday she told the nurses for the first time that she was hungry. She did have a quarter of a sandwich and apparently she drinks 2 ensure a day. She also asked my sister about the rest of us so she was stable, TG.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2012, 09:37 AM   #15
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: charlotte, nc, usa
Posts: 7,186
Gabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB UserGabriel HB User
Re: Mom won't eat?

Remember that I said... those with dementia have a difficult time expressing pain. If you ask them if they hurt they will more than likely tell you no. Their ability to comprehend what you are saying to them and process an adequate answer is limited. So "NO" works for them. Even if you figure out that they are having pain, they can not tell you the location of that pain. You have to watch their body language and actions. If she is grimacing, furrowing her brow, clinching her hands, tensing her muscles, then those are an indication of pain. Agitation and anxiety are indications of pain. Her medical conditions all indicate some level of pain. Morphine is a pain medication so the medical staff must have suspected pain involvement.

An example of what I am talking about. My Dad had chronic back pain all his life and very painful arthritic knees for the last decade. Yet, after his dementia reach a certain level, he never complained of the pain. The causes of the pain did not go away, just his ability to determine what was wrong and express it. He would get agitated and anxious, stop eating, pinch up his face and look angry. Two tylenol would bring him back to his sunny disposition! Dementia patients communicate through body language and behavior.. not verbalizing! Anxiety is an indication of pain.

At this point in time it is hard to tell if the chicken or the egg came first and it really doesn't matter. Congestive heart failure does have symptoms and it can cause pain. Pain causes anxiety. Anxiety causes heart related symptoms which came compound the congestive heart failure... and around the circle you go again. With the morphine the staff is looking for something to break that cycle. That is what is needed now, something to interrupt the cycle she is on.

You do have some indication that she is getting better. She did eat enough and she is asking about family. She was resting comfortably. Those are all good signs. After her hospitalization it will take a while for her to readjust. If pain is involved that needs to be under control. It appears that both of those are happening. So she is better today than she was a few days ago... and for that I am thankful

Love, deb

 
Reply With Quote
Reply Reply




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:29 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!