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Old 02-06-2007, 08:41 AM   #1
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Sensory Issues

Hello Again,

For those on the board that have dc with sensory issues, I was wondering when you started to notice them? I know I've been posting on the board quite a bit, but I feel that the most useful information is found from experienced parents.

My son doesn't seem to have any serious sensory issues right now (crowded places, noise, light,smells, don't seem to bother him at this point).

Just wanted to get an idea of when folks started noticing sensory issues?

Thanks a lot!

JM

 
Old 02-06-2007, 08:56 AM   #2
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Re: Sensory Issues

Hi JM..............Drew lost his speach first at 18 months. Then his eye contact was close behind. His sensory issues started slowly, within a few months noises, touching anything like sliced peaches or stickey food, crowded places with too much talking grew worse. He would have a melt down. Until we got him help he continued to decline into the fog.
He is doing wonderful now. Drew is 4. Lots of therapy.
We saw no problems with his development at all until about 18 months.

 
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Old 02-06-2007, 10:54 AM   #3
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Re: Sensory Issues

I can't really say when my mother started to notice my sensory issues, but they were definitely there by age three. That's when I remember for sure that I threw fits over sensory things, like clothes and bright lights in department stores.
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Old 02-06-2007, 11:07 AM   #4
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Re: Sensory Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyLuvr1920 View Post
I can't really say when my mother started to notice my sensory issues, but they were definitely there by age three. That's when I remember for sure that I threw fits over sensory things, like clothes and bright lights in department stores.
-GatsbyLuvr1920-
My son was just diagnosed with SID last week. Can you just give me an idea what all this entails? I know that it circles with the PDD-NOS, but I am so confused on this whole subject. Thanks, Michele

 
Old 02-06-2007, 04:55 PM   #5
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Re: Sensory Issues

Hi Mom2PDD

You should really read a copy of The Out-Of-Sync Child. It explains sensory integration step-by-step, and it's very easy to understand. Sensory issues are really complicated, and your son should surely be getting OT for sensory integration.

There are three main systems involved in sensory integration. I've copied and pasted some info for you. If you have any questions, let me know.

Tactile System: The tactile system includes nerves under the skin's surface that send information to the brain. This information includes light touch, pain, temperature, and pressure. These play an important role in perceiving the environment as well as protective reactions for survival.

Vestibular System: The vestibular system refers to structures within the inner ear (the semi-circular canals) that detect movement and changes in the position of the head. For example, the vestibular system tells you when your head is upright or tilted (even with your eyes closed). Dysfunction within this system may manifest itself in two different ways. Some children may be hypersensitive to vestibular stimulation and have fearful reactions to ordinary movement activities (e.g., swings, slides, ramps, inclines). They may also have trouble learning to climb or descend stairs or hills; and they may be apprehensive walking or crawling on uneven or unstable surfaces. As a result, they seem fearful in space. In general, these children appear clumsy. On the other extreme, the child may actively seek very intense sensory experiences such as excessive body whirling, jumping, and/or spinning. This type of child demonstrates signs of a hypo-reactive vestibular system; that is, they are trying continuously to stimulate their vestibular systems.

Proprioceptive System: The proprioceptive system refers to components of muscles, joints, and tendons that provide a person with a subconscious awareness of body position. When proprioception is functioning efficiently, an individual's body position is automatically adjusted in different situations; for example, the proprioceptive system is responsible for providing the body with the necessary signals to allow us to sit properly in a chair and to step off a curb smoothly. It also allows us to manipulate objects using fine motor movements, such as writing with a pencil, using a spoon to drink soup, and buttoning one's shirt. Some common signs of proprioceptive dysfunction are clumsiness, a tendency to fall, a lack of awareness of body position in space, odd body posturing, minimal crawling when young, difficulty manipulating small objects (buttons, snaps), eating in a sloppy manner, and resistance to new motor movement activities.

Suzy

 
Old 02-06-2007, 04:59 PM   #6
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Re: Sensory Issues

Hi ANGDAD

In retrospect, there were alot of signs, early on. Liam couldn't breast feed , he jumped up and down contuniously whenever he was held upright, he banged his head and didn't react to pain, he avoided eye contact and being touched. All of these signs showed up by six months.

Suzy

 
Old 02-06-2007, 06:20 PM   #7
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Re: Sensory Issues

Those things didn't seem to bother my son either. I think we started noticing tactile issues between 18 months and 2 yrs. (My son too had problems breast-feeding.) Didn't want to touch anything...putting sunblock on was like applying acid. What we did was put his favorite toys in a box that had dried rice and beans in it for him to hunt through: turned it into a game. I think the sandbox did wonders. We would put shells in it. We would write letters in whipcream on a plate. Everynight I would put lotion on him. Only as much a he could tolerate. A toe one night, try to do 2 toes the next night until the issue was gone. ( he can tolerate sunblock all over himself now)

I think once you get a diagnosis it's hard to see what are typically behaviors and what aren't. You find yourself looking through a micrscope at your children and waiting for the storm to hit. You sound like a good Daddy trying to prepare for the red flags. What I always try to remember is ...they have to be making all these tag-less clothes for somebody. Take care & good luck

 
Old 02-06-2007, 06:22 PM   #8
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Re: Sensory Issues

Michele,
I'm sorry that I did not get these to you sooner but I had a family emergency I was dealing with. If you could answer the following questions for me it would be very helpful.
1. When and how was your son's disability first recognized?
2. What was your initial reaction and questions to the diagnosis?
3. How did you obtain the needed services for your son and are you satisfied with the services provided?
4. How do you feel that your son is progressing now?
5. What future plans do you have for your son?
6. Please address any other concerns you might like to discuss.

Thank you for your time and information.
Deb

 
Old 02-07-2007, 05:50 AM   #9
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Re: Sensory Issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by educgradstudent View Post
Michele,
I'm sorry that I did not get these to you sooner but I had a family emergency I was dealing with. If you could answer the following questions for me it would be very helpful.
1. When and how was your son's disability first recognized?
2. What was your initial reaction and questions to the diagnosis?
3. How did you obtain the needed services for your son and are you satisfied with the services provided?
4. How do you feel that your son is progressing now?
5. What future plans do you have for your son?
6. Please address any other concerns you might like to discuss.

Thank you for your time and information.
Deb
1. He was 10 mo when he started saying mama and dada. By the time he was 15 months he wasnt making any sounds. The dr. Kept telling us it was because he was a boy, wait until his next chech-up. Every check-up until he was 2, we heard the same thing. So, I took him to a free check-up with the EI and he qualified for Speech and Language Delay. Andrew also had been sick all the time and on many meds for allergies, asthma, ears, etc. We had tubes put it, that didn't make a difference. He had fundoplication surgery for reflux, that didn't make any difference. Everything they were blaming didn't seem to have any recourse to his behavior or speech. We switched Pediatriciance at 2, and automatically, the Dr. said mild autism and ADD. I was floored. I was shocked. I didn't want to believe it and for the next year I was going to prove her wrong. So, we switched back to our old pediatrician. He still wasn't making any progress. The school tested him and he was borderline because of his age. We waited until last July and got him an appointment at Monroe Meyer Institute where they diagnosed him PDD-NOS. Also signing him up for the Severe Behavior Disorder Clinic three days a week.
So- in a nut shell- I have always known there was something different, but couldn't figure it out and I wasn't going to stop until I had the answers that I wanted to hear.

2. My initial reaction was disbelief. Not my son. Didn't like the diagnosis so I went back to my original pediatrician. I didn't want the diagnosis from the other one to follow him, especially since he wasn't tested at that time.

3. I received awesome services through the school system through Early Intervention. Now that he is four, he is in the early ed. preschool program and I am okay with it, but we are having more problems. And, I know that it is because he is older and things are changing, but it is harder to get them to help me. So I have outsourced help on my own through Children's Hospital. We start Behavior counseling next week and I have to set up OT today (they called and left a message finally.)

4. His speech is doing outstanding. He can speek in 4-5 word sentances. There are many words we don't understand yet, but we are very happy in this area. His behavior is getting worse. He is more aggressive and mean. He is getting into trouble at school for not listening and talking back. His temper tantrums are getting more often and longer.

5. Right now we are just trying to get through each day without problems. I don't really think about the future other than him getting better with his behavior and us helping him all we can.

6. I don't have any other concerns other than I am trying to find out all the information I can about PDD-NOS and Sensory Integration Disfunction.

If there is anything else I can help with, please feel free to ask. Thanks, Michele

 
Old 02-07-2007, 10:46 AM   #10
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Re: Sensory Issues

Mom2PDD- From what soozeq said about SID, I don't think I have that. I just have sensory issues, but other than having trouble learning how to button things as a child, I don't have those types of problems. The only other thing that's sort of similar to me is the vestibular problems. That's probably why I rock when upset or tired. My biggest sensory issues are being wet, flourescent lights, being in crowds, and tight clothing.
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Old 02-07-2007, 12:50 PM   #11
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Re: Sensory Issues

Thanks for you wealth of information. I actually ended up getting on Amazon and ordering two books on Sensory and two on Autism. I am hoping they will shed some light. But, I am in agreement on the OT and all other support for Andrew. We start OT on the 16th. Michele

 
Old 02-08-2007, 03:43 AM   #12
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Re: Sensory Issues

hi michele

I'm so glad to hear that you're starting OT, how wonderful for your son. I bet he'll love every minute of it. Can I ask what books you bought? If I could, I'd recommend that after you read the Out-of-sync Child (please read that one first, for a basic knowledge) try Building Bridges through Sensory Integration. It was one of the first books I read and how we hooked up with our therapist. She's a co-author and has taught me an unbelievable amount about sensory integration. She kind of took us under her wing. Again, please, if you have any questions about behaviours or concerns, just let me know. I may be able to direct you to an answer.

Remember, our son's behaviour is always a message, it's our job to interpret that message. Good luck at OT!!

Suzy

 
Old 02-08-2007, 05:10 AM   #13
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Re: Sensory Issues

The books I ordered Unraveling the mystery of autism, Raising a Sensory Smart Child, Unlocking the Mysteries of Sensory Dysfunction: A Resource for Anyone Who Works With, or Lives With, a Child with Sensory Issues, Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Complete Guide to Understanding Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, Pervasive Developmental Disorder, and Other ASDs, and The Autism Sourcebook: Everything You Need to Know About Diagnosis, Treatment, Coping, and Healing. I ended up opening a new account and getting a $30 credit. Couldn't beat that. So, I am on the way to helping Andrew achieve his best. Michele

 
Old 02-09-2007, 11:39 AM   #14
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Re: Sensory Issues

Hi. I am new here and need help about posting questions. How do you post new questions?
My son, who is 31 months, was diagnosed with autism this week. I have been researching autism and SI for awhile now, so it did not come as a complete surprise. I'm still reeling from it though and want to talk to toher parents. My son has some visual and tactile sensory issues. The Out-Of-Sync child is a great book! It's a great resource.
My question is, has anyone used Prozac to help their child with sensory or repetitive behaviors? We have just entered a research study at UNC Chapel Hill and they want to use Prozac on my son to help balance his seritonin levels. They said this should help him be able to focus/concentrate on learning new skills. I am trying to find out as much as I can about Prozac, ABA, and all the other therapies out there. Any help or info would be greatly appreciated!!!!Thank you!!!!

 
Old 02-09-2007, 12:39 PM   #15
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Re: Sensory Issues

When you get onto the autism site, there is a tab on the left top corner that says NEW THREAD. You can post new questions there. I don't have any info regarding Prozac as we are just in the beginning stages of meds now with clonadine. Good luck! Michele

 
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