It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Autism Spectrum Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-18-2008, 12:53 PM   #1
Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Meadville, PA US
Posts: 55
ANGDAD HB User
Concept of "wait a second"

Probably another funny question but should a two year old understand the concept of "just a second" or "after I do this?"

If our son wants pancakes for example, he will use his word for pancakes and say it over and over and over. If my wife says "just a second" or "after I pick this up", he typically freaks out like we're not going to make them.

Is he supposed to understand the concept of "wait a minute" at this age??

Thanks

John

 
Old 02-18-2008, 02:24 PM   #2
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: FL, USA
Posts: 27
rebecca197334 HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

My four year old son does not have a concept of "wait a minute". Everything for him is impulsive. He does not share or take turns. Not without a tantrum. He has not been labeled with autism, but he may be on the spectrum. He has several developmental delays. He is mentally about 30 mos in most aspects of his life.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 02-18-2008, 05:19 PM   #3
Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 470
Picali HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

Hi John,

I'm trying to think back to the two year stage - seems like so long ago! But I don't think so many two year olds would understand 'wait a minute'. You might try using something more concrete to show him the time span (like an egg timer or something, you know the sand filled ones that you tip over?). Or if you use picture sequencing with him show him the picture of what you are doing first (before you make the pancakes), or will he respond to distraction? Something like, yes, pancakes, lets read a story book first or making funny faces or something (works with some children, not with others!). Or can he help make the pancakes - maybe if you gave him a small bowl of flour to play with while you make them, would that distract him at all?

I think the thing with all children, asd or not, is that, frustratingly, there's not usually one thing that they all respond to - we've tried umpteen different techniques over the years, some work some don't. My little boy responds well to distraction and being 'involved', but for other kids that wouldn't work so well.

 
Old 02-19-2008, 07:10 AM   #4
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 537
datgrlstef HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

My kids are 4 and 5. Neither of them really grasp the concept. My nephew is almost 10, and well, he has problems with it, too. It's a kid thing, I'm sure.

 
Old 02-19-2008, 03:04 PM   #5
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: FL, USA
Posts: 27
rebecca197334 HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

I have two sons, 3 and 4. Their worst time of the day is when i'm cooking dinner. They just can't cope knowing i'm in the kitchen. They want food, just like if they were at the grocery store. It's a maturity thing, i think. I am alone while i'm cooking so trying to keep them occupied is torture. I recommend the crock pot, or something very short to cook.

 
Old 02-19-2008, 05:19 PM   #6
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Lake Jackson, Texas, USA
Posts: 16
SherriEleano HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

I don't know about 2 year olds, but we tell our daughter to count when she's waiting for something.

 
Old 02-21-2008, 01:31 PM   #7
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: united kingdom
Posts: 1
koala blue HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

Quote:
Originally Posted by ANGDAD View Post
Probably another funny question but should a two year old understand the concept of "just a second" or "after I do this?"

If our son wants pancakes for example, he will use his word for pancakes and say it over and over and over. If my wife says "just a second" or "after I pick this up", he typically freaks out like we're not going to make them.

Is he supposed to understand the concept of "wait a minute" at this age??

Thanks

John
Hi John,
This is just friendly advice not professional.
I currently work in primary and secondary schools in the UK as Autism Intervention. This means I go to a school for 3 weeks and set things up working alongside the class teacher and teaching assistant to model how to help kids with ASD in school.
Your question regarding 'waiting' is that the child is frustrated as he/she does not think you understand what they are asking because you are not doing what they ask immediately.
I usually start with photographs that I use as a timetable so at school it would be for a morning session of a reception aged child 4-5 years:
register, choosing (and seperate pics of toys such as sand, water, puzzles)
carpet time, story time, lunch.
Each symbol/picture is removed after each activity and verbally reinforced that next is ..... if the child asks or goes to the colouring desk, visually reinforce the activity symbol and simplified language eg. work first THEN colouring.
You may want to use a timetable at home as it can be very benefitial as it makes the evening predictable so it could read:
snack, computer, drawing, tidy up time, teatime, pancakes, reading, supper, bath, bedtime.
Each symbol is removed after each activity showing that you will make pancakes, just not at this minute!!
Alternitively, use a sand timer for visual reinforcement. They are bought from educational catalougues though.
I am currently training a boy to sit on the carpet with peers for 10 minutes with the timer, which he is now doing very nicely and gets to play with the trains after. I have done this for years and the older boys I started this with now sit in assembly without carpet spots or books or timers.
If you need any other information, please pm me.

 
Old 02-21-2008, 02:05 PM   #8
Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: usa
Posts: 54
LostN07 HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

When my son was here (hes passed now) I would just use simple words and small ones.I would say "WAIT" and put my hand up for him to stop. you have to be consistant and keep it the same. It worked for my son.

 
Old 02-24-2008, 02:53 PM   #9
Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 361
golfhat HB Usergolfhat HB Usergolfhat HB User
Re: Concept of "wait a second"

I agree. Say wait, -- & put your hand up like a stop sign so that he sees it.

But most of all, distraction is key. a two year old will not understand the concept of wait a second --- how can you explain wait a second or wait a minute to a 2 yr old?- Let him watch you getting the ingredients, "
ask does he want to help? etc. Anything to distract him from his feeling of impatience.

the more he hears you say wait (instead of wait a second) followed by a hand motion, and time passes before what he wants happens, he will start to get it. Not like it maybe, but he will get it.

By the way, he may still be impatient at 4...24, 54....and so it goes.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
CIN II - Age 41 - wondering about "wait and see" vs. LEEP Bean2008 Cancer: Cervical & Ovarian 12 10-14-2008 06:59 PM
TSH level was 6.... Dr. wants to "wait and watch"... I"m concerned.. MarlaKate Thyroid Disorders 12 04-10-2007 08:43 PM
200/100 and the docs tell to "wait & see" janrich High & Low Blood Pressure 7 10-03-2005 12:31 PM
Ok my second "rant" and "vent" SiestaDrew Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia 6 04-28-2005 04:44 PM
Getting "another" opinion vs "second opinion" StillWater Back Problems 5 10-07-2004 06:43 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Adderall
Clonidine
Depakote
Folic
Lamictal
  Prozac
Risperdal
Ritalin
Strattera
Zoloft




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



mscat40 (15), Suzanne44 (5), JackyCJ (4), peyto (3), Administrator (3), elmhar (2), sjs40 (2), tysonsmum (2), March97 (2), jacobsdad (2)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1013), Apollo123 (909), Titchou (856), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (763), ladybud (755), midwest1 (670), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:13 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!