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Old 06-27-2006, 07:23 PM   #1
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Unhappy Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I found this forum while searching for a resolution for my back pain. I am 34 years old and have had mid (thoracic T5-T6) back pain on only the right side for 15 years. I first got the pain when I was pregnant with my first child. I have been to several doctors, Neuro, Chiro, PT, message, prolo therepy & accupuncture. I have tried anti-depresents, anti-inflamitories, muscle relaxers, neurotin, other neuro type meds, and currently on Vicodin (which works okay during the better days and not at all during the not so better days), Dr has recommended Morphine or Oxicodone (maybe it was Oxicotin). I have used the tens unit, botox, cortesone, and lidoderm patch. As you all know it is very difficult to discribe pain, but here it goes....to the right of the T5 before the main muscle, I feel a tingle type pain. The muscle to the right of the spine feels like a bad tooth ache (sometimes tingly) and the muscles going to the shoulder blade and right under the shoulder blade just feel like they need a severe message, all areas throb sometimes as well. I have had message therapy several times through out the years and currently have received a message once a week for about 6 months. Feels great while I get it, but by the next day, right back where I have been. My pain has not kept me from being who I am, an active mother and a wife, but sure has decreased the value of my life (exp. I can not sit at the cinema without changes positions 30 times and getting up 6 times). I really rely on taking the vicodin and my doctor is fine with keeping this up forever. I really do not want to rely on this medicine to make it through every day of my life.
There is some background, I am sure I missed lots of stuff. My question is....I am scheduled for a MRI in two days, so I got a copy of my previous MRI that I had in 2001 (5 years ago) for my new doctor to compare if needed. I read the results and it reads "A small area of increased signal is noted inferiorly in the T5 vertebral body. This increased signal is noted on both T1 and T2. Its appearance is consistent with a small benign vertebral hemangioma. These are not usually of any significance." The rest of the report just says that the thoracic spine is essentially unremarkable. The Neuro did not share this with me at the time.
Does anyone know what this really means? Could my symptoms be caused from this tiny little thing? Is it just a coincedence that this is on my T5 and my pain originates from my T5 and is only on one side of my back?

Thank you very much for your responses,
Kristi

Last edited by Biermanclan; 06-27-2006 at 07:47 PM.

 
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Old 06-28-2006, 05:13 AM   #2
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

Hi Kristi... I have a tiny bulge in my T2-T3 and a herniated T11-T12... I too get that pain and pressure between my shoulder blades, and according to the MRI, and doc, the T3 shouldnt bother me... Just the T11 should... One doctor thinks that my mind is concentrating too hard on my pains, and therefore, amplifying them and that worrying brings on pain... Perhaps he is right.. Perhaps, I am making myself tense and tight? The discomfort is very real... Some friends recommended yoga.. You may want to consider the same, but first, get your MRI results to see if their is something new... If everything looks clear, then perhaps relaxation and stretching will help.... I know that when I excercise, I feel better, so it must be doing something... Sorry that I cant give you much more than that..

Let me know what your MRI says.. God bless..

Maurice

 
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Old 07-10-2006, 05:45 PM   #3
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

Here is an update on my MRI findings. Minimal disk degeneration is evident on T3-T4, T5-T6, & T9-T10. A few punctate hyperintensities seen within the bone marrow itself reflect small vertebral hemangiomata (they may have spelled it incorrectly). They did one on my Lumbar also and it looks like their is some stuff going on, but I do not have pain in my lower back. I will be going to the pain clinic on Monday and I will talk to the doctor about the hemangioma. Since my first MRI showed nothing but the tiny hemangioma on the T5 and this MRI (5 years later) shows a small one (they did not specify the location) I just have to wonder if this is causing my pain. What is different about when it states "seen within the bone marrow"? Has anyone received any of the treatments they offer for these? If so, I would love to hear from you all. I hope I am not disappointed at the Pain Clinic. I really appreciate any of your comments.
Kristi

 
Old 09-28-2007, 01:52 PM   #4
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I am so hoping that you are still out there. Your pain beginning when you were PG and being on the right side is making me wonder if you have something similar to me. I can't get any help...all the doctors think I am crazy and I do everything I would if I felt well but my son deserves a mon with more energy and when I am hurting I am more irratable with him and my husband....I want to feel better so I can enjoy my baby...and have more without the fear of just being a tired mommy all the time. Did you ever find anything out about your thoracic pain?

My story: I had a baby 18 months ago and had an epidural. The epidural was painful going in (a lot of pressure on the nerve) so she pulled it out and went back in. My thoracic back was in a lot of pain while I laid on my right side to let the epidural affect the right side of my body too. The epidural was extremely painful coming out, which I hear is not to be the case. I had never had an ounce of back pain before or during my pregnancy and here I am 18 months later with my doctor telling me he does not know what else to do with me. They say the epidural has nothing to do with my pain but I find it to be coincidental.

My T spine MRI showed a small bulge at T11-12 and a hemangioma at T10.
About the T10 area I have pain and it will radiate up my back through my shoulder blades, often causing spasms in my neck where I can't even turn and have to have it massaged out. It is a burning sensation that kind of tingles but not in good way at all. It feels heavy, kind of like pressure and the pain reminds me of a black cloud just moving up and across my back and then it just stays there rest of the day. It is usually there but faint in the mornings. Activity definitely affects it in a negative way. It makes me irritable and I am extremely tired since this does result in my not sleeping well.

This is negatively affecting my quality of life. I am literally turning grey at the age of 29 and I just want to feel better so I can enjoy my baby. I have not felt well and energetic for 18 months now and that is starting to get me down. When I think of how this is affecting my interaction with my son, I just feel terrible about myself. I also worry about my backís reaction to future pregnancies. Please say you can help me.

 
Old 05-26-2009, 07:51 AM   #5
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

Can anyone out there who has been diagnose with vertebral hemangioma give me a description of the symptoms, pain, etc? I've been experiencing thoracic pain on my right side for 4-5 months. Doctors keep saying it's a "muscle spasm" that will take time to heal. I disagree. I've had an x-ray which they said showed mild arthritis. Could they have read the x-ray as arthritis when, in fact, it is a hemangioma? Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks so much!

 
Old 05-27-2009, 12:04 AM   #6
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I have vertebral hemangiomas at T11 and T12 spanning across and covering T12 almost completely. I have no symptoms that can be tied to them, but have lots of other problems with my cervical, thoracic and lumbar. It is very rare for them to be symptomatic in all the research I have done I really couldn't get much on how they finally figure it out that the pain is from them. I think the biggest way is by excluding everything else and if you have pain along the dermatome for that level that matches correctly.

They are rare -10% of world population has them. Around 1% are said to be symptomatic. Ask your doctor if you have extraosseous (outside the bone) or intraosseous (inside the bone). I think the extraosseous are the ones usually found to be symptomatic (growing and pressing on spinal cord or nerves).

It is possible to have slight fractures or bone degration under them, maybe you have pain from that issue. I also know the nerve roots from T5,6,7 exit and run real close to the back surface. It is possible your are irritating this part of your back on chairs, sleeping, tight bras, or posture.

If you research use symptomatic hemangioma to point you in the right directions.

If pain is truly bothering your life keep working with the doctor.

 
Old 05-31-2009, 10:24 AM   #7
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

to answer a question asked by someone on the previous page, you really do need a good MRI to really see any level of actual hemangioma.

the one thing i have learned,among other things,when dealing with any level of hemangioma? location location location really means everything. depending upon just where it is actually located within the body(you can get these in many places including the liver,spinal cord and brain)will kind of dictate whether or not it even becomes symptomatic or will actually cause pain too.

when you jus think about the many different types of bone disorders out there like with arthritis,that do cause alot of inflammatory typew pain,having anything 'IN" a bone or even on it can create its own type of real pain to have to deal with. it just does. i have bone marrow edema caused by my RSD in my knee. anytime the dewpoint goes up,that head of my femur with the marrow edema goes crazy with very deep intense bone pain. just very achehy and throbby types of pain. bone marrow aspiration is ONE OF THE WORST procedures a paerson can have,,so having anything that is actually impacting a bone or more so within that bone in the marrow,i would think could create alot of different types of pain just having anything 'IN" a bone itself.

one thing that hemangiomas just do is ooze little bleeds from time to time too. this in and of itself can create pain too. it engorges the veins that actually make up what a hemangioma actually is(it is a little glob of veinous fed vessls) which just that change in size would have the possibility of causing pain as well. despite the fact that our bones do not have real nerves like the rest of our body areas do, the bone itself can create alot of pain at certain times, just have not figured that part out yet.

just recently having a rotator cuff repair done was one of the most excruciating surgerys ever, and i have had six and an aneurysm coiling too. this surgery involved among other things, shaving down certain areas of bone and also placing anchor pins into the very top of my humorus. i have had, tho it has recently gotten better,VERY severe bone pain just from the stuff that was done with the bone areas in there. i still get a residual bone ache type pain from time to time too depending upon alot of whether changes. its just reactive to it now.

most actual bone related pain is very much achey and throbby with at times more sharper types of aches involved as well. to the original poster here, your areas of what you described as pain at that same level as your hemangioma,i personally really do think it was much more related to your angioma just being where it was and how deep it is into the bone area. some are considered 'active bleeders" and some never bleed at all. the active ones just have a bigger likelyhood of causing not only pain but other symptoms too just because of how the blood can affect tissue or muscle or any area that reacts to actual blood products(muscle spasms and trigger ponts,depending upon where that blood is). many areas of our body that are not normally exposed to blood will get a bit angry/irritated when exposed to certain blood products. your hemangioma just needs to be better explored as part of your ongoing pain at least. it can create alot of problems for one person and nothing for another.

my hemangioma was actually found right smack in the middle of my spinal cord. before this was even Dxed when it just happened to show up as an "incidental finding' on my c spine MRI that i was having becasue of symptoms of a herniated disc(i DID also have a herniated c 6-7),it had bled already at least once. if you see the words "hemosiderin staining' pop up somewhere in any report, when it is certain areas of the column or cord,it does indicate a bleed has taken place. its just much easier to see it when it is in the cord area itself tho.

tho my particular hemangioma did not actually cause direct 'pain' per se, it did create ALOT of really over the top 'perceptionary" nightmares to have to "feel'. when the cord is involved to any degree with anything, it tends to create more perceptionary types of strong sensations where it 'feels like' something is actually being "done' to your body? i had a non stop 24/7 perception of what felt exactly like someone was behind me trying to actually pry off my freaking shoulder blade with a pry bar or something. just this non stop torqueing prying sensation that never ever went away til that cavernoma came out of my cord. there was also a ton of pressure behind that shoulderblade as well. very very strong feeling of something trying to actually 'push out' from under that right blade area. just insane.

like i mnetioned before,what really dictates any real pain and or symptoms from any hemangioma really does depend alot upon its actual location and what it is actually impacting around it. just so you know,there are many different names that these can be called too. that last MRI you had where they called it hemangiomata, is one. others would be cavernous hemangioma, angioma. but these are bascially a lesion formed of only veinous fed vessels that were probably there since you were being formed in utero. most are congenital in nature and just form kind of like a strange 'birthmark" in some of us.

there is an arterial form, or counterpart called an AVM,or arterioveinous malformation. this is kind of the same as having a higher pressure type of an aneurysm formation somewhere? when these decide to bleed,it can be a catastrophic thing, unlike with the veinous angioma when it bleeds with that little ooze of blood. but within a spinal cord,a bleed just takes up more cordspace, which was my main problem with mine. that is why it had to come out, before it closed off any remaining cordspace. that was by far my most terrifying surgery ever and the worst lessor of two evils type decision i ever had to make for myself as well.

but this is what i know about hemangiomas just having to really research the living hell outta these little buggers to even begin to really make that best informed decision with my particular case. i just DO really think, for a few different reasons, that your particular angioma just being where it is IS causing you at least some of your real pain there. just wanted to let you know that in a very long winded way,sorry. Marcia
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3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
Old 08-30-2009, 07:57 AM   #8
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I recently was told I have a 1 cm lesion in T6 that has features consistent with a hemangioma. My Dr said this wouldn't cause pain but I have a lot of pain in my middle and lower back. Should I get a second opinion? I don't know where to go from here. Have you had any relief from you pain? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Celia

 
Old 08-31-2009, 09:13 AM   #9
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

honestly celia,the best possible place i went for mine after getting two totally differing opinions from two other neurosurgeons was the university of MN where they just tend to see more of the rarer types of stuff so they KNOW more about them in the teaching hospitals. if you should hppen to live near any teaching type university hospital, this is where i would go for the best most informed type of opinion as far as what this is capable of and what it means for you.

these globs just can and do cause pain or strange sensations or just what feels like alot of real pressure kind of pushing outward at times too. the key here in getting the best help is finding the specialist who just has seen more of them, which like i mentioned above, would more than likely just be in a teaching hospital of some kind. when people have strange things found in their bodies, they do not get the best most experienced type of help from most docs. it takes seeing alot of patients with that same condition to really truely educate any level of specialist with any real condition so alot of them, like myself just end up going to the teaching hospitals where they do get taken much more seriously. they are also trying to teach up and coming docs there too so they DO want to have them see these types of problems too. if you do happen to live near any university hospital i would speak with your doc about getting referred to the head of the neurosurgery dept or the ortho. but i personally think seeing the neurosurgeon would give YOU the best possible info considering what this is and what it can effect under it or in that area to have to deal with.

but these do cause pain depending upon just where they are at. i would think if you are actually feeling that deeper achey more constant type of pain,or what feels like bone pain? that it would more than likely be stemming from the angioma in that bone. if this doc refuses to aknowlegde your pain then i really would obtain that second opinion. you KNOW your own body and what you feel in it. is the hemangioma the ONLY real finding in that particular area? if it is, well its kind of a no brainer for your doc to simply put two and two together ya know? a 1 cm size lesion actually IN the vertebrae is something that just would be painful. some docs are just sooo freaking clueless when it comes to hemangiomas. like i said, location IS everything with these suckers.

just how is this angioma described in the MRI report word for word? i would start doing some really in depth research on these things and print off anything that backs up pain with having them and present it to your current doc and any others you may see as well. while in some locations they will actually create no real problems or pain, but the opposite is also true too. it just comes down to where it is, what it is impacting that will dictate pain or real symptoms.

it wouldn't hurt to see if you can also be referred to a good pain management facility too in helping to try and manage the pain you are having. they just know how to treat pain of all kinds at these types of clinics. i have been seeing my pain doc since 2004 after my hemangioma had to be removed from within my spinal cord. they have helped tons in dealing with alot of different pan issues i now have from different conditions. they can just use many different modalities to try and manage even the worst of the worst types of pain there that you just cannot get offered at any docs or specialists type of situation. just a good suggestion for you for what you could be fgeeling now or in the future.

but getting to see any specialist who just has had alot of experience with these things would be your very best way of getting the best most experienced type of help. and that is what you just need with the hemangiomas, experience and knowledge from someone who has just seen the most patients with them. and i do think your best bet is possible at all would be at the university type hospitals. my NS there knew everything i did not hear from the other two NSs i saw. just really amazed me in the huge differences in opinions i got with this thing from seemingly very knowledgable actual neurosuregons too.

i hope this helped some. just do the research and really look for anything and everything you can find about pain and hemangiomas just so you can have that to prove to some idiot docs that these DO and can cause pain, depending. let me know how things are going celia. good luck, Marcia
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3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
Old 08-31-2009, 09:43 AM   #10
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

Hi Marcia. Thank you for your reply. This is what my MRI results say:

Lumbar: "The lumbar vertebral bodies are normal in signal intensity and height. There is slight desiccation of the discs, but no disc protrusions present. Mild arthritic facet joint disease in the lower lumbar spine. No compression fractures present. Spinal cord is norma in signal intensity and morphology. The patient has a 1.7 cm renal cyst." (I was told this is nothing to be concerned about)

Thoracic: "A 1 cmm lesion is present in T6 that has signal features consistent with a hemangioma. No significant disc pathology is demonstratedc in the thoracic spine. The thoracic vertebral bodies are intact, and there is no fracture or subluxation. The spinal cord is normal in signal intensity and morphology."
(I was told this was nothing to be concerned about either and is not the cause of the pain)

Today my hips and legs hurt so bad I can hardly walk - and I get a pain in the middle of my back.

Oh, the Dr I see is actually a Dr's assistent or whatever they call them. (I think a PA?) She works for a Unniversity Hospital.

Last edited by lilcee; 08-31-2009 at 09:45 AM.

 
Old 08-31-2009, 02:18 PM   #11
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I think you keep going for opinions until you find something. More importantly, read everything you can get your hands on. That is the only way I got at least minor resolution to my issues. I suffered with back spasms and intense pain in the thoracic area for about 6 months now. MRI showed a bulging disc at T7/T8, but no other significant issues other than some minor arthritis. All consistent with my age (34). I finally found something called Myofacial Pain Syndrome - basically it is when your muscles tighten up so much that it causes pain. the only way to get relief is from muscle relaxers (I dislike taking any kind of medication) or trigger point injections. Basically what happens is when these muscles tighten up, they form a "trigger point" which can forever become agitated by movement, etc. and cause pain. I went to the doctor about 3 weeks ago and got about 15 (painless) injections into the muscles in my back. I have noticed about a 60% improvement in the pain I am experiencing. Needless to say, my life has gotten dramatically better. I would let myself suffer in pain because I hate taking pills, but even still, I was taking 1-2 pain pills per day and a muscle relaxer, if necessary. In the past 3 weeks since the injections, I have taken maybe 5 pain pills total and every day gets a little bit better. It might not be exactly what would work for you, but something to look into. Keep me posted. Good luck

 
Old 09-01-2009, 10:56 AM   #12
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

hi tlanser, i had a really really great suggestion for you to help with that hidious myo pain hell? have you ever tried a therepy called myofascial release with or without craniosacral therepy? this therepy has helped with some VERY severe and very impactful myo pain that i had been dealing with for many years. most of the severe muscle damage i have is from after having a surgery done on my spinal cord where they had to make a huge incision thru all those thick muscles up from mid neck down to my shoulder blades? i also have a huge mess that IS my crappy c spine. i was referred to this one particular myofascial release therepist thru my pain clinic and really new nothing about it then. this man has helped to even FINALLY take away two huge ugly TPs i had had that got created and just sustained from a hemangioma inside my cord that gave me insane pain under that right blade for over ten years. it was just 'there" all this time but we didn't know what the real generator was til i had an MRI done that found my herniated c 6-7 but also that glob inside my cord too.

for those two particular TPs to finally have been dissapated was a miracle since these had just litterally tortured me for over a decade. i had tried hundereds of TP injections and used every type of muscle relaxer ever and still this crap stayed untill about my third myo release session. they were just totally and completely gone for good. blew me away really considering they had been there for so long.

but if you have never tried this particular type of therepy, or did try but had a crappy unexperienced therepist(expereince is just crucial for the best possible therepy) it can help sooo much in just 'righting" all of that interconnected fascial sheet that IS like a huge spiderweb like covering that is all connected from arond our brains and down to our toes. fascia also covers all muscle, organs, and our blood vessels too. i have now been seeing my myo therepist for about three years only becasue i have a huge amount of spinal issues and other medical problems that this therepy just helps with pain management for. but most people who have myo pain and problems can somtimes not have to continue depending upon just what the underlying generators are. i just have way too much wrong like everywhere for me to stop now.

but if you have never actually tried this i would VERY highly recommend it to you. i can almost guarentee you if you can find a good experienced therepist(my PT has about 20 years doing this) it can have a huge positive impact on your whole body in different ways since like i mentioned above, that fascia just is all interconnected, meaning a problem in your upper back can trigger problems in other areas too once that fascia just gets inflammed and irritated. it will thin out, then it tightens itself up sometimes very severely depending upon what started that process to begin with.

just something considering what you described above could really help alot with what you happen to have. this really is the only true therepy out of sooo freaking many i have tried over the years that has a very direct and lasting impact. and you don't have to keep taking any muscle relaxers either if it works well enough for you. marcia
__________________
3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
Old 09-03-2009, 11:46 AM   #13
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

I know the pain from my thoracic vertebral hemangioma is constant 24/7 awful pain that u can hardly stand. I get to the point i am sick of it and get depressed. Mine is in T2 took over entire left side of t2 and is in the pedicle and has t2 enlarged. Noone will do anything for me they say too risky. Have been to three neurosurg 1st said take out but sent me for second opinion and they laughed at me. 3rd one wouldn't do nothing either. All i know is my pain is really bad.

 
Old 09-05-2009, 08:51 AM   #14
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Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

sorry i did not see your response earlier celia. i was not ignoring you at all, i just kind of 'expected" with all my blabbering long posts on page two there that any response from YOU would also have shown up on this page thee too. my bad.

any way. the fact that you have a PA who is actually connected to a U type teaching hospital can help you tons here in just pushing her to get you in to see the head of their neurosurgery dept. like i mentioned before, experience is sooo incredibly crucial with hemangiomas i cannot even BEGIN to explain all the whys there. it just will give YOU the most experienced and knowledgable info on what "your' particular angioma means for you now and in the long run. unfortuently(as you and i and many others have already found out) there just are soo many totally clueless neurosurgeons out there who just do NOT actually have enough patients they see in most private practices to even begin to fully understand the ramifications for any given patient or that depending solely upon that location, that in and of itself also is more important as far as ANY pain/other possible symptoms stemming from these too.

right now i would be really pushing this PA to let you see the head of the neurosurgery dept. that is the more likely place where you will find the best most experienced type of info. i saw three seperate NSs with three totally differing opinions on what mine ment for me and this little sob was right IN my spinal cord and not the safer outter vertebrae. very flippin scarey. but that third opinion who had decades of experience was the ONE who could answer ALL of my many questions and appropriately treat mine given the fact i was almost out of actual cord space from bleed enlargemnt too. i know without a doubt in my mind at this point that if i had not actually consented to that resection surgery there, i would have become paralyzed by now from just under my breasts on down. it was just that bad and intermittantly bleeding into my cord. just see what this PA can actually do for you. tell her you just NEED to find out the whole picture here. she should be able to get you to the right NS. i do hope this works out for you in just even seeing that more experienced NS. its just the key forthe best understanding and treatments too. please keep me posted celia, marcia


soapies, honest to god, i cannot EVEN begin to try and imagine being laughed at by ANY level of doc let alone a real specialist? thats pretty sick. as i told celia, honestly, the best possible place i can really think of would be for you too to try and get to ANY university teaching facility with what you just have going on in there. it could actually be removable depending upon just how the actual vessels are that have this kind of 'anchored' into that bone actually are. i am sure there are other ways to try and actually even 'get rid" of this particular type of vascular malformation if you could just get to the right type of NS who just truely understands them and the best ways to try and manage or remove them from any bone. they could possibly even sclerose this by injection? meaning they inject this with a certain chemical and it kind of shrivels up in there? but that would of course depend upon MANY different factors.

but these are the types of real options and just plain good experienced solid info you just truely need right now and that wont come unless you just see any NS who simply HAS the most overall experience. like i told celia, your best bet for true experience and knowledge would just be a good teaching type uni hospital since people tend to go to these types of facilitys as kind of a last hope type thing when no one else can understand their particular rarer types of conditions.

and this WAS me(in 2002) for my third opinion hoping that the head of neurosurgery had much more of a freaking clue than the two other NSs i saw who were seemingly very knowledgable about other issues but they gave me two totally differeing types of opinions. geez, now that certainly helped. i was just angrey and pretty darn scared by the time i actually got to the U of MN where i found MY wonderful NS who just knew everything i needed to know and more.

unfortunetly it is up to us and only us to just really have to advocate for ourselves with this type of thing. you just keep pushing and pushing til you get those very real NEEDS met. thats what i had to do too. you just DO deserve to have your debilitating condition taken much more seriously than to actually be laughed at? god i cannot even tell you how sick i feel over you having to even endure that at all. also seeking out a good pain management type of clinic would help you tons in just finding the best possible ways/modalities to really try and treat this hidious pain these can create. you just do deserve better overall care and treatment soapies. i do hope you live near a uni teaching hosp. even if this is like hours away from you, the overall level of experience and knowledge there is well worth it in the very long and short run for you. please DO keep us posted hon, marcia
__________________
3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
Old 09-05-2009, 01:23 PM   #15
Senior Member
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: United States
Posts: 186
lilcee HB User
Re: Thoracic back pain and benign vertebral hemangioma

Thanks for your reply. I was thinking about checking out the Mayo Clinic we have here in Jacksonville, FL. I've had several people who told me I should try there. When you said yours was bleeding, did you have any certain kind of symptom? The reason I ask is that sometimes I get a knawing - cramping kinda pain in my back. At one time I thought it was my kidneys and went the ER but they said it was just a muscle spasm. But I've been getting it more lately.

 
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