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Old 01-12-2013, 04:01 AM   #1
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Pain in groins and thighs!

[SIZE="2"]I have fybromyalgia and am also spina bifida...(not that you would know it!) I have had a very active life up till about ten years ago when my back finally became too painful so am now clasified disabled.
I have had a lot of pain in the top of my thighs and groins which makes it almost impossible to stand at all for any length of time. No amount of painkillers eases this.
Does anyone else suffer this?[/SIZE]

 
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Old 01-12-2013, 07:41 AM   #2
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Re: Pain in groins and thighs!

Whenever someone complains of being unable to stand or walk for long, I immediately think of stenosis. This is a narrowing and it can occur in the central canal or in the foramen, which are openings located at the vertebrae which allow the spinal nerves to leave the spine and travel out to the limbs and other parts of the body.

When one of these areas becomes narrowed or clogged, the nerve can become compressed. This results in pain that can be felt in the back or anywhere along the path of the nerve. For example, if the L4, L5 or S1 nerve ends up getting squished, one can feel the pain in the groin, buttocks, leg and even foot and toes. This is the type of pain people often call sciatica or sciatic pain.

There are a number of issues that can contribute to stenosis. A bulging disc that extends out from the disc space can cause stenosis in the adjoining foramen, or can push back into the thecal sac that surrounds the central canal. Arthritis can cause the facet joints (the synovial joints located at each vertebral body) to enlarge, which causes narrowing of the adjoining foraminal openings. Arthritis causes bone spurs to form which also contribute to stenosis, etc.

Prior to 2008 I had severe stenosis and eventually could not stand for more than a minute or two -- I couldn't stand long enough to chop an onion without severe pain setting in. I then had surgery to open up these areas...and more surgery in 2010 and can now walk as far and long as I want.

You can find lots of information online, including excellent photos and diagrams that will help you to understand what is most likely causing your pain. I imagine if you have a MRI you will be able to see it for yourself.

Good luck. Opening these channels might resolve at least most of your pain.

 
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Old 01-13-2013, 08:02 AM   #3
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Re: Pain in groins and thighs!

Interesting points that you make about the other areas affected as my left leg and foot plus my big toe on that foot are always quite painful as well. The big toe is actually almost numb and my feet are [I][U]always[/U][/I] really cold....even in the hottest weather and I might be sweating madly.

 
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:20 AM   #4
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Re: Pain in groins and thighs!

Sounds to me like you have some lower lumbar nerve compression going on (like L4 or L5...maybe S1). Nerve pain can result in changes to sensation or movement. There can be muscle weakness, and/or all kinds of sensations including pain that feels like an electrical shock, like water trickling down the leg, various pains and feelings of temperature change.

My feet were cold and I always slept with socks on, even in the summer for about the last three years. It just occurred to me a couple months ago that I wasn't wearing socks to bed any more. My feet felt normal again and I hadn't even noticed! (this was after surgery, after my affected nerves were decompressed.)

Look for a "dermatome map" online and you will see that the big toe is innervated by the L4 nerve. The middle toes are L5 and the little toe is S1....The nerves innervate a particular area of the body in a predictable pattern. Pain that runs down the back of the leg is almost always related to a L5 or S1 nerve compression...L4 runs down the side and a bit over onto the front of the thigh....

Read up on spinal stenosis and see if it may be what is causing your problems.

 
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