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Old 12-03-2011, 04:28 AM   #1
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mscrevasse HB User
Blood work

i went last week to have my bllod drawn for testing. For the first time ever, my blood was so thick that she could barely get half a tube. Whay could this mean ? I hate to sound stupid, but could the fact that it was cold outside have anything to do with it ?

 
Old 12-03-2011, 09:37 AM   #2
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Re: Blood work

if you actually live in louisiana, i would "probably' think that that type of cold, say compared to us here in MN or any colder state would really have much to do with this. i live in MN and have had perfectly normal labs in THAT regard even when i am absolutely freezing in that docs office in winter. our blood is kept pretty warm from the main arterials that are just much deeper in the body that would also eventually rewarm any more outter(peripherals, and where that blood is taken from) type of venous blood vessels too kinda thing? what did your doc have to say about this? just exactly how old are you?

my mom has 'overly thick' blood casued by a condition OF the blood called 'factor five(or V) leiden deficiency"? this DOES tend to also place anyone with thicker blood, unless usually treated with some type of a blood thinning med, a much higher risk for clots and stroke too if NOT treated appropriately. my mom NEVER ever had a clue she had this til after she had an actual stroke. which leads me to kind of wonder if this WAS something that kind of developed, or merely 'presented itself' after so many years like alot of different conditions and disease processes can tend to do usually in more of the fourth to fifth decade of life(but she just happened to be already in her late 60s and had had many blood draws before with nothing out of the ordinary EVER really showing up TIL post stroke labs were done at the hosp).

at any rate, you just DO need a much deeper exploration of your blood to try and determine exactly what is behind this now. esp if this was NEVER anything that showed itself before. i do know that there are quite a few people in the, i believe its called 'blood conditions' or something similar forum we have here on HB that you could pose some questions to the people there and just also read thru others experiences with this as well.

but the MAIN thing that you just DO need to know about now, is what specifically IS creating that thicker than the norm blood. esp if this IS new for you. its just more 'UNlikely' that this would just have been some kind of a fluke thing, but a much more underlying and real reason for it to have even BEEN THAT thick at all. did they even DO a much more in depth look with MORE blood labs after this was simply even found out just considering? if not, you make another appt with that same doc for further exploration of the reasons for and what your blood is like now too. kind of a "comparritive blood draw" to see if any changes have occured.

while their CAN be other reasons for overly thick blood, the most 'common' just IS that factor V leiden deficiency. if i were you here, beside seeing the doc again for more bloodwork, DO do some research on your own about this one potential condition(or do a search on 'causes for overly thick blood') and see how your symptoms simply match up so you just do have an underlying concept of this condition when you see that doc again. the more you just know about the possible causes makes you a much more informed patient.

but DO also check out that forum here( the 'title of that forum DOES have the word 'blood" in it i think. its kind of a new forum so i cannot recall for certain) they have on blood condtions or however its worded for good info that i KNOW i have seen alot about that factor V asked about. but whatever the real cause just IS, if this is going to be 'your new normal' it DOES require blood thinning meds just to help keep any potential risks and or events much less likely for you. its just NOT a good thing to have at all since it can have some pretty impactful comnplications and risk factors. but it CAN be helped.

just what WAS the original 'reason' for these particular labs to be even drawn in the very first place??

just make that follow up appt. your doc 'should have" done this anyways considering risk factors of even HAVING overly thickened blood flowing thru out your body. just do some reasearch on what i stated above using THAT sentence of keywords and it should bring you to alot of info i KNOW is out there(i DID also look this up when my mom was dxed with it too). this just is a much more common condition than one would think.

but DO make CERTAIN to ALWAYS obtain each and every 'type' of actual testing result sheets or reports from any other types of testing ever done on you too, esp any scans and bloodwork(including what labs you just had done as well esp). they set that 'baseline' with the first initial test that every subsequent future testing simply will get compared to too. i have EVERY scrap of bloodwork testing and alll my many MRIs, CTs, angiograms and ultrasound info too(i have both a kidney and liver disease on top of ALLL my other crap). this is simply YOUR own medical file that YOU just keep on yourself. trust me when i say, just even having in your own posession alll of your own test results not only allows you to actually read thru them, but if you should ever have some type of more 'emergent' situation, you just grab that file(an expandable folder is what i use) and go to the nearest ER and will have a whole baseline and comparritive test results to go by right there in the ER too. saves alot of time, hassle and you as a patient even TRYING to recall what any given 'test' had stated about something specific that ALWAYS gets asked of us. this way you just hand over that folder to them, and making darn sure you get back EVERY copy of YOUR own stuff, and that part is done. just good common sense stuff, ya know? i personally have started placing my own little adress labels on EVERYTHING that IS mine and mine alone copies so i can always get them back one way or another if i should not be able to get them back or am admitted and my stuff is not 'following me' there. hopefully this is only factor V and can be easily treatable. but THAT just really IS what you HAVE TO find out for yourself soon. good luck with this and please DO keep me posted on anything you may find out. just DO get back into that doc for more bloodwork actually ON the bloods make up and what is calleed a PT and PTT too. this shows how quickly your blood is clotting. and THAT just is something else you NEED to know as well. it usually is a pretty 'average' type of time parameter there with clot times. if your IS much quicker than the average ratios, it needs to be treated with come type of blood thinner. and then regularly monitored too from there. this is what my mom does and has been doing since her BT med was started, very regular monitoring with what is called an INR. good luck and let me know what gets found out. FB
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Old 12-12-2011, 06:38 PM   #3
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Lightbulb Re: Blood work

Honestly, the temperature of the body really does not have much (if any) of an effect on the thickness of the blood. I work in an ER and hospital and a lot of times I will draw blood from patients who are cold or shivering. What happens is that as the brain senses that the body is too cold, it sends messages to the cardiovascular system that literally cause vasoconstriction (the narrowing of blood arteries and veins) to make sure that the blood supply is conserved to your major organs, brain itself, and the core midsection of your body. The fact that your blood was flowing slowly into the test tube was not due to its thickness, it was because the person who drew your blood did not get the needle fully into the vein that they were taking blood from or did could not get enough due to vasocontricted veins at the time because your body was cold. When your skin senses that the surrounding area is cold, your brain kicks in and automatically tells your cardiovascular system to constrict small veins and capillaries in your hands and feet in order to conserve your blood supply to its major organs and the brain itself. It is not your fault, it was the individual's fault who drew your blood. As a healthcare worker, I can fully understand that sometimes people have small veins and its hard to get their blood, but I always find a way to get blood necessary to run certain lab tests. Your blood was not flowing slow because it was coagulating (clotting) too fast or because of it thickness and if that is what you were told, the person who drew your blood was lying to you to get excused from it. Most test tubes have anticoagulating (anti-clotting) factors in them already to make sure that when tests are run in the lab, the blood is not clotted so that they get clear test results. Such factors include lithium heparin, sodium heparin and EDTA. Any other question you have regarding lab tests and lab blood collecting, feel free to let me know because that is part my job. So dont be worried, it is completely normal!!!

 
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