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Cancer: Cervical & Ovarian Message Board
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:23 PM   #1
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AIS New to board

Hi Ladies,
I am new to this and this is my first post. I have just been diagnosed with AIS this past thursday. My gyn told me this is NOT cancer, however after reading through the threads here, it seems like most of you have been told this IS cancer? I am schedule for a cone biopsy in a few weeks. Any info would be great!
Thanks!
LC

 
Old 05-16-2011, 04:49 PM   #2
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Re: AIS New to board

It is my understanding that "carcinoma in situ" is exactly the same thing as CIN3... in other words, it's the most serious level of precancer, but is not yet cancer.


I don't know if your condition, Adenocarcinoma in situ, means something different, but I wouldn't think so.

Whether it is or isn't cancer doesn't matter so much; the fact is, if it's "in situ" that means it's non-invasive (so far) and should be easily treated simply by removing the lesion.
Think of skin cancer: since it's typically non-invasive, doctors simply remove the mole in question, and the cancer is cured.
I'm sure that's how it is with cervical cancer "in situ". It's still confined to the cervix. It will be easy to get rid of.

It still sucks; I'm not trying to make light of it. But it's not nearly as bad as it could be. Thank God they found it early enough that a complete cure is virtually guaranteed.

Best of luck.

 
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Old 05-16-2011, 04:51 PM   #3
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Re: AIS New to board

PS- just did a little more research.
Adenocarcinoma in situ is a precursor of adenocarcinoma of the cervix.
So, it's still precancer. It's just serious precancer.

Good luck.

 
Old 05-16-2011, 04:57 PM   #4
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Re: AIS New to board

thank you for responding...i appreciate it!

 
Old 05-16-2011, 09:26 PM   #5
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Re: AIS New to board

The difference between AIS ans CIS is that CIS involves squamous (skin) cells and AIS involves glandular cells. CIS is much more common than AIS. AIS is thought to be more serious because glandular abnormalities move faster. But I think a lot of that is because a lot less in known about glandular abnormalities. There isn't a lot of good data on progression rates for AIS like there is for CIS. For example, doctors know that about 25% of CIS will eventually become invasive. Doctors has NO IDEA what percentage of AIS will become invasive.

The question of whether AIS is cancer is an interesting one. The answer you get is probably dependant on the doctor you ask. In situ cancers are cancer cells, but they aren't invasive. Most doctors describe in situ cervical cancer as precancer. But if you had the exact same thing, carcinoma in situ, in your breast, your doctor would most likely tell you that it's cancer and refer you to an oncologist. I have no explanation for this. It makes no sense!

The recommended treatment for AIS is actually hyterectomy. However, some women (myself included!) only have a cold knife cone, but this is considered "conservative management." AIS is usually treated with a cold knife cone as opposed to a LEEP because then the edge of the specimen can be examined by the patholigist. With AIS, you really want to make sure they got it all. AIS occurs inside the cervican canal, so it's harder to detect recurrences than it is with CIS.

The reason hysterectomy is the recommended treatment is because AIS can have "skip lesions." Basically you have AIS, then healthy cells, then more AIS. Even if you get the "clear margins" result from the cone, you can't be 100% sure that the AIS is gone. From what I've learned, doctors used to think these skip lesions were common, but they actually aren't. According to on gyn/onc I spoke to, they occur in probably less than 5% of adenocarcinomas.

But because of the possibility of skip lesions, AIS requires A TON of follow up. CIS requires repeat pap smears, every 3-6 months for a few years, and then back to annual paps. AIS requires repeat paps, colposcopies and ECC (where they scrape cells from inside the cervical canal, ow!) every 3 months for a few years, and then every 6 months for pretty much forever. If you're done with your uterus, actually the easiest path is to get a hyst.

I had AIS. I had a CKC with clear margins. 3 years later and I have had clear follow ups the whole time. AIS sucks, and something you should take seriously, but it's totally managable.

Last edited by LilyL21; 05-16-2011 at 09:30 PM.

 
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Old 05-17-2011, 04:16 AM   #6
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Re: AIS New to board

Thank you! I am so glad to hear you are doing well. This has been a scary process but I'm glad to know there are options. I have not had children yet so I too am going with the CKC first and then we'll go from there. Thanks again

 
Old 05-17-2011, 10:12 AM   #7
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Re: AIS New to board

Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyL21 View Post
The difference between AIS ans CIS is that CIS involves squamous (skin) cells and AIS involves glandular cells. CIS is much more common than AIS. AIS is thought to be more serious because glandular abnormalities move faster. But I think a lot of that is because a lot less in known about glandular abnormalities. There isn't a lot of good data on progression rates for AIS like there is for CIS. For example, doctors know that about 25% of CIS will eventually become invasive. Doctors has NO IDEA what percentage of AIS will become invasive.

The question of whether AIS is cancer is an interesting one. The answer you get is probably dependant on the doctor you ask. In situ cancers are cancer cells, but they aren't invasive. Most doctors describe in situ cervical cancer as precancer. But if you had the exact same thing, carcinoma in situ, in your breast, your doctor would most likely tell you that it's cancer and refer you to an oncologist. I have no explanation for this. It makes no sense!

The recommended treatment for AIS is actually hyterectomy. However, some women (myself included!) only have a cold knife cone, but this is considered "conservative management." AIS is usually treated with a cold knife cone as opposed to a LEEP because then the edge of the specimen can be examined by the patholigist. With AIS, you really want to make sure they got it all. AIS occurs inside the cervican canal, so it's harder to detect recurrences than it is with CIS.

The reason hysterectomy is the recommended treatment is because AIS can have "skip lesions." Basically you have AIS, then healthy cells, then more AIS. Even if you get the "clear margins" result from the cone, you can't be 100% sure that the AIS is gone. From what I've learned, doctors used to think these skip lesions were common, but they actually aren't. According to on gyn/onc I spoke to, they occur in probably less than 5% of adenocarcinomas.

But because of the possibility of skip lesions, AIS requires A TON of follow up. CIS requires repeat pap smears, every 3-6 months for a few years, and then back to annual paps. AIS requires repeat paps, colposcopies and ECC (where they scrape cells from inside the cervical canal, ow!) every 3 months for a few years, and then every 6 months for pretty much forever. If you're done with your uterus, actually the easiest path is to get a hyst.

I had AIS. I had a CKC with clear margins. 3 years later and I have had clear follow ups the whole time. AIS sucks, and something you should take seriously, but it's totally managable.

Last edited by miaverline; 06-08-2011 at 03:57 AM. Reason: lol my reply didnt go on the end of this, thank you Lily, that is a great post, and answered some of my questions xxx hugs

 
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