It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Cancer: Prostate Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-27-2008, 11:45 AM   #1
Junior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: palos hills ill usa
Posts: 44
csyleen HB User
Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

I am reading that 400 mg of Selinium, Brocoli, Brocoli Capsules, Soy Protein and Green Tea can slow down or even prevent prostate cancer. Does anyone have any thoughts on this subject?

Last edited by csyleen; 07-27-2008 at 12:22 PM.

 
Old 07-28-2008, 07:34 PM   #2
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by csyleen View Post
I am reading that 400 mg of Selinium, Brocoli, Brocoli Capsules, Soy Protein and Green Tea can slow down or even prevent prostate cancer. Does anyone have any thoughts on this subject?
Oh yes!

I believe that nutrition/supplements/diet, exercise and stress reduction all play a substantial role in preventing and combating both prostate cancer and the side effects of treatment. These tactics have been part of my own approach for my challenging case from the time I began learning about them in early 2000. There is a lot of solid evidence out there , although virtually none of it is absolutely conclusive. There is also a lot of bogus advice out there.

I first learned about nutrition from a handout in the office of the fifth urologist I consulted (three were second opinions), the doctor who has remained my urologist (though my oncologist manages my care). The handout was the work of Michael Milken, the financier and prostate cancer patient/advocate who founded the former CapCure Foundation, now known as the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

Soon I was learning a lot more from back issues of Dr. Charles Myers' Prostate Forum newsletters, which frequently covered nutritional topics related to prostate cancer. Over the years I've found him to be an excellent source, and I trust his recommendations. Several other doctors have also provided nutritional recommendations, and much of their work is good, in my opinion.

I personally want a certain quality of evidence before I commit to a nutritional tactic. For me, a pile of anecdotes, especially from someone trying to sell a product, doesn't cut it. I'm also not satisfied with impressive results in laboratory studies (culture dish experiments and the like) and animal studies. I belong to an organization that sells vitamins and other supplements, the Life Extension Foundation (LEF), that does an excellent job describing such research. However, for LEF, lab and animal studies are enough to get excited about a nutrient. I believe that without some human research, that is going off half-cocked and can be dangerous. I want some sound research of nutrients in humans, even better in men, before I commit. With all this in mind, here are some of the key nutritional tactics I believe in, keying on the major recommendations from Dr. Myers plus other items he favors but with less enthusiasm. I've found a preponderance of evidence in [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url] that supports each of these recommendations. Many of these are from his campaign "Tell One Friend How to Prevent Prostate Cancer".

No red meat - including pork: the danger is mainly from the aracidonic acid as well as the saturated fat.

Avoiding dairy fat and egg yolks.

Eating fish several times a week. Actually, my wife and I do that at dinner, but I have a few pieces of herring almost every day as part of lunch.

Consuming about 4,000 IU of fish oil per day.

"Avoid canola and flaxseed oil at all costs." The danger is from the alpha linolenic acid, which men (and older women) do not metabolize well, and which fuels prostate cancer. This is one of the few areas where what is good for women is not good for men. Men with cardiac issues will have to make a choice between supporting prostate cancer treatment versus cardiac treatment, as alpha linolenic acid appears to help some with cardiac problems. Ground flaxseed is a different story, we think. It may even be beneficial, as the oil it contains is far less concentrated than straight flaxseed oil, and the ground seed contains lignans, which may be beneficial for us. Olive oil is an excellent oil for us.

Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Broccoli comes in here, and it is better to cook it to release the nutrients we need. I have some at lunch every day, seasoned with cocktail sauce, which is a good source of lycopene.

Eat stewed or cooked tomatoes. They are excellent sources of lycopene, which research suggests helps us combat prostate cancer. Moreover, even heavy amounts of lycopene appear to be very safe, unless you are allergic to it or to tomatoes. Red and pink grapefruit and watermellon are also good sources. There is nothing wrong with raw tomatoes, but a lot of the lycopene remains encapsulated and passes right through us without being used.

Drink two to four cups of green tea a day. I currently try for ten bags worth of tea a day (five twelve ounce cups with two bags each). I always brew it with a few drops of lemon juice as that prevents rapid oxidation of the tea, which would decrease its potency.

200 mcg of selenium a day: This is the dose, taken daily for years, that appeared to cut the incidence of prostate cancer by about 61% in one very large, randomized, placebo controlled trial that was mainly aimed at skin cancer! Note that the dose is lower than the 400 mcg that you mentioned above. Recent reanalysis of data from the same large trial indicates there may be a very low risk of increased diabetes from taking selenium at a dose of 200 mcg for years. I reduced my dose from 400 mcg to 200 mcg when that study was published, and Dr. Myers has never recommended a higher dose. I get tested annually for diabetes as part of an annual physical, and I'm not close to being diabetic. A very large trial is now in progress to help determine whether selenium, vitamin E, or a combination of both are effective in reducing the incidence of prostate cancer. Unfortunately, we won't know the results for several more years. At one point Dr. Moyad opposed selenium consumption; I think he has since come around. Those of us living in areas where there is abundant selenium in the soil don't need supplementation; North and South Dakota and Nebraska are rich in selenium, and there may be other areas that are also rich. The Atlantic Coast and Pacific Northwest have low levels of selenium in the soil.

200 IU of vitamin E daily. This too appears beneficial in reducing prostate cancer risk. However, while a dose of 200 IU appears very safe, some cardio risk has been reported at doses around 400 IU daily and higher. Dr. Mark Moyad, another doctor who writes a lot about prostate cancer and nutrition, has focused on that fact to recommend against taking vitamin E. I think he is throwing out the baby with the bath water.

30 mg of lycopene a day. Dr. Myers feels that is useful as a backup to natural sources, which don't give many of us enough lycopene. I'm not fond of the added expense, and a recent study using a promising supplement, LyCoMato, was discouraging. It's not hard to get that much lycopene in the diet, and that's what I do. With a couple cups of V8 and some coctail sauce daily, I'm way ahead of the game.

At least 1000 IU of vitamin D a day. Actually, Dr. Myers and some other leaders in nutrition believe that you want to get your 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test result to be in the 50 to 80 range, but aiming for less than 100. Some of us will need a hefty dose of vitamin D to do that, perhaps 3000 to more than 5,000 units per day or more. I was consuming about 3,000 to 4,000 IU per day last year, and with my other dietary sources, my score rose to about 140, which is not safe, alarming both me and my oncologist. I stopped all supplemental D over the winter and got the level down. The bottom line is that it is important to get the blood level tested. Dr. Myers considers vitamin D to be perhaps the most important nutrient for prostate cancer patients.

Other recommendations include:

Soy. A study led by Dr. Maha Hussain a few years ago found a benefit for prostate cancer patients from 200 mg per day. A lower dose did not help. Dr. Robert Leibowitz, a prominent medical oncologist specializing in prostate cancer, for many years has been adamantly opposed to soy for prostate cancer patients. I respect Dr. Leibowitz, but I'm convinced his evidence is weak. I get 200 mg of soy daily.

Resveratrol. A good source is red wine.

Dark chocolate.

It's getting late, so I'll break off here. This list covers most of the main territory.

Jim

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 07-29-2008, 01:40 PM   #3
Junior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: palos hills ill usa
Posts: 44
csyleen HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Has there been a study of men with prostate cancer slowing or stopping its growth by taking these supplements? I also read that
( Cell Forte, IP6, Inositol } dramatically boosts the body's natural killer cell activity and immunity.

 
Old 07-29-2008, 04:34 PM   #4
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by csyleen View Post
Has there been a study of men with prostate cancer slowing or stopping its growth by taking these supplements? I also read that
( Cell Forte, IP6, Inositol } dramatically boosts the body's natural killer cell activity and immunity.
Yes, there is such research for some of the items, and I like to check what is happening with searches on [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url], the site we can use here because it is a Government site. I'll do a search like " vitamin D AND prostate cancer ", then click on the authors lists to get an abstract of the article. But keep in mind that nutrients alone do not seem to be enough to do the whole job, except for perhaps mild cases of prostate cancer. Here's an example:

POMEGRANATE - I forgot this one last night, in part because news about it's helpfulness against prostate cancer is fairly recent - just two years ago in July, but it is a great example of the kind of item that appears to be quite helpful. Like all the elements I listed, the evidence is not conclusive, but it looks good.

The main evidence for pomegranate juice comes from a Phase II clinical trial done by a highly regarded research team at UCLA. They used POM Wonderful pomegranate juice to see what impact it would have on slowing the doubling times of men who had recurrences of prostate cancer after treatment (PSAs of at least .2 and less than 5, Gleasons not exceeding 7).

In simplified terms, what they found was dramatic: where the PSA had been doubling every 15 months on average at the start of the study, with 8 ounces of the juice daily the average rate slowed to a doubling time of every 54 months! Lab tests showed corresponding evidence that the cancer was back on its heels! Think about it: you're recurring after, say, surgery or radiation, and you're worried you need follow-up therapy. You're also worried a bit whether you may not survive. Then you discover a convenient, pleasant, relatively inexpensive way to put the brakes firmly on prostate cancer growth!

That's what happened. At least we think so. It was a Phase II trial, which means it did not involve many patients, and it wasn't randomized with a control group with neither patient nor doctor knowing whether the patient was getting the nutrient being studied (double blind). Also, the study was funded by the POM Wonderful company, which raises the possibility of sponsorship influencing the results, though the research team is known for its excellence, and hopefully there was no influence.

Still, while there is some uncertainty, the results look promising. At least one doctor is reporting that his patients who drink high quality pomegranate juice or take a high quality pomegranate extract are seeing good PSA results. I'm taking two capsules a day, and I'm pleased with how I'm doing; it's possible the capsules are making a key difference, but there's no way for me to be sure. By the way, it appeared that even more juice than 8 ounces would be more effective, but that would involve enough added sugar to possibly contribute to other problems. The researchers considered 8 ounces a reasonable balance of effectiveness and safety.

Here's the citation for the study for anyone interested.
Clin Cancer Res. 2006 Jul 1;12(13):4018-26
Phase II study of pomegranate juice for men with rising prostate-specific antigen following surgery or radiation for prostate cancer.
Pantuck AJ, Leppert JT, Zomorodian N, Aronson W, Hong J, Barnard RJ, Seeram N, Liker H, Wang H, Elashoff R, Heber D, Aviram M, Ignarro L, Belldegrun A.
Department of Urology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

I can give you leads to research on other nutritional items if you are interested.

About the supplement you mentioned, I don't know about it but checked [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url] with this string and got 11 hits: " IP6 AND inositol AND prostate cancer ". (I got a lot more hits when I left off the prostate cancer term. However, when I limited results to clinical trials, even Phase I clinical trials, I got no hits. Research is proceeding, but it appears to be early with only lab and animal studies to date. While there are some encouraging results in those studies, the majority of items that do well in lab and animal studies do not pan out when put through human studies. That said, at least your supplement made it past that first important hurdle.

Jim

 
Old 07-30-2008, 02:23 PM   #5
Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: NJ,USA
Posts: 362
shs50 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Jim's comments are well researched and documented. The bottom line is that nutrients help boost the immune system's ability to protect the organism from infections, inflammation,etc. No credible science in human studies exists that proves nutrients can prevent or cure any cancer. Few if any alternative treatments have been shown to cure cancer although desperate people have been driven to them after established medical treatments had run their course.
The NY Times Science Section published an interesting story this week about the process Ted Kennedy employed in deciding to fly down to Duke for radical brain surgery for his aggressive glioblastoma which was contrary to the established treatment protocal of radiation and chemo employed at Mass General and most other cancer centers. His prognosis was about 3-6 months but he opted for very aggressive surgery which in some instances has extended survival by months to a year or two. He also accepted the risk of neurological side effects such as speech impairment or paralysis.The operative term is "aggressive surgery " intended to remove as much tumor as possible in order to extend the effectiveness of the radiation/chemo treatments. Unfortunately nutritional supplements aren't nearly powerful enough by themselves to reverse a disease as aggressive as cancer once its invaded one's tissues,bones, blood or organs.

Last edited by shs50; 07-30-2008 at 02:30 PM.

 
Old 08-01-2008, 04:24 PM   #6
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

I've added a few observations, in green, to your post below. Thanks for mentioning the immune system aspect of nutrition. I was aware of it, but I tend to forget about it in focusing on other effects.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shs50 View Post
Jim's comments are well researched and documented. The bottom line is that nutrients help boost the immune system's ability to protect the organism from infections, inflammation,etc.

Yes, and nutrients also have other effects that appear important for prostate cancer. Some might be considered immune related in the broad sense, but they are not just about infections, inflammation, T cells, natural killer cells, lymphocytes, and the like. Examples of such other effects are preventing DNA damage (such as selenium), counteracting oxidative stress such as that coming from too many free radicals (such as in many of the recommended nutrients, including vitamin E, selenium, lycopene, and antioxidant fruits and vegetables), providing a mild anti-angiogenesis effect, affecting medications and treatments (quercitin is said to greatly increase cell sensitivity to radiation, antioxidants decrease the free radicals generated and used by radiation therapy - consensus seems to be to hold off on them during radiation, grapefruit juice substantially decreases the breakdown of certain medications - leading to higher than prescribed doses, etc.), and altering the way certain genes are turned on or off. This is far from a complete list, but it gives some idea of the range of effects of nutrition. There are many hundreds of studies on nutrients and prostate cancer.

No credible science in human studies exists that proves nutrients can prevent or cure any cancer.

That's the way I see it too, at least as of the summer of 2008. But I think the day is coming soon when that will change, at least as far as achieving partial prevention (or proving to be a highly discouraging bust! . The best shot is probably the SELECT trial, a very large (35, 534 enrolled), long term (12 years of follow-up intended for each enrollee), placebo controlled, randomized, double-blind (neither patient nor patient's trial coordinator knows which part of the study he is in) trial of selenium, vitamin E (alpha tocopherol), a combination of both, or neither (the placebo). Enrollment was completed in June 2004, and interim analyses are planned at the 5, 7, 9 and 11 years of follow-up points. To me that suggests the first interim analysis will be done about five years after June 2004, or about this time next year, with the final about 2015. I'm hoping an interim report will be published and not just used for trial monitoring. This trial is designed to provide proof if it is there. It should also give us a pretty good idea whether there are some adverse side effects; already, another study has indicated that the dose of vitamin E - 400 IU, may carry a very small cardio risk (with virtually no risk at 200 IU). An earlier trial involving selenium as a secondary objective was highly encouraging - the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial, but it was not designed to provide proof for selenium.

Wouldn't it be great if we found a nutrient, or a combination, that was even partially as effective against prostate cancer as citrus fruit was for preventing and curing scurvy!


Few if any alternative treatments have been shown to cure cancer although desperate people have been driven to them after established medical treatments had run their course.

My impression is that many over-hyped alternative treatments are highly effective as wallet-ectomies, efficiently siphoning money from our pockets to the therapy practitioners' pockets. Even some nutritional elements that look great in lab and animal studies, such as essaic acid and curcumin, face huge problems in reliable, proven safe absorption by humans, so the great-sounding studies in product literature probably mean little in a practical sense. Frankly and bluntly, after following nutritional research for years as guided by Dr. Myers's newsletters and talks as well as conferences and other resources, I doubt there ever will be a nutritional cure for all prostate cancer. Too much study has already been done without finding that magical sword to make such a general cure at all likely. I hope I'm wrong. On the other hand, there is abundant evidence that nutritional tactics can probably play an important, even vital supporting role, can very likely achieve prevention for many men, and may be able to cure low-risk cases.

... Unfortunately nutritional supplements aren't nearly powerful enough by themselves to reverse a disease as aggressive as cancer once its invaded one's tissues,bones, blood or organs.

I would like to underline that important point, at least based on what currently has been proven. I get concerned when I hear patients say they are relying wholly on some nutritional approach, without medical treatment, to deal with their prostate cancer.

I wish I could say I had found a nutritional, exercise or stress reduction tactic or combination that definitely was helping me beat prostate cancer. I've had plenty of PSA tests in the past nearly nine years - at least averaging six a year, as well as other tests, so I have a shot at seeing whether there is an impact. I haven't found that smoking gun.

On the other hand, I'm achieving what I think are awesome results for my high risk case (diagnosed with a PSA of 113.6, flared to 125, in December 1999, all cores positive, most 100% cancer, Gleason of 7 (4+3), perineural invasion, stage 3, prognosis of just five years by two respected urologists (Johns Hopkins, City of Hope), both predicting three good years and two declining years).

Instead, I'm now in just my second off-therapy period of triple hormonal blockade with finasteride maintenance and Fosamax/now Boniva, boosted by low-dose thalidomide (plus 300 mg vitamin B6 and 81 mg coated aspirin), and my quality of life is very good, much like before diagnosis except for some minor thalidomide side effects and more scalp hair due to the finasteride maintenance. Preliminary data on other intermittent triple blockade patients indicates the treatment is doing the heavy lifting, but I'm convinced that my nutritional, exercise and stress reduction tactics are playing an important supporting role. I won't be surprised if some day we learn that these kinds of tactics can knock some prostate cancers into dormancy and keep them there indefinitely, and that the tactics give an important assist in dealing with other cases.


Last edited by IADT3since2000; 08-01-2008 at 06:22 PM. Reason: Minor grammatical fix.

 
Old 08-03-2008, 04:33 PM   #7
Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: NJ,USA
Posts: 362
shs50 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Jim:
You certainly have acheived awsome results with your hormonal blockade regimen for your high risk case. You've also managed to keep the other options of surgery and/or radiation available if needed. Took a great deal of courage and conviction for which you are to be greatly admired. Keep up the successful work and stay healthy. You've more guts than I would have had under the same circumstanes.
Bob

Last edited by shs50; 08-03-2008 at 04:34 PM.

 
Old 01-20-2009, 10:27 AM   #8
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Lewisville, TX
Posts: 1
genterprise HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

What happened to the Vitamin C therapy for Cancer? How did Linus Pauling, (who almost had 3 Nobel Prizes) stave off his Prostrate Cancer until he was 96 years old? Why did he have to prove the effectiveness of his therapy by taking 18000 mg. of vitamin C every day for more than 25 years? What kind of therapy was built on this after his passing? Is it true that people can tolerate up to 50,000 mg of Vitamin C daily when they are very ill?
Does Vitamin C become Ascorbate in the bloodstream? Is there a limited amount of Vitamin C absorbed into the bloodstream by oral use? Can Ascorbate be administered intravenously to increase the amount of Vitamin C in the bloodstream? Who wrote the book on Ascorbate?
What is the titration method of determining tolerance for oral doses of Vitamin C?

Personally, if I am sick, or under the weather I will take more than 18000 mg of Vitamin C in a day if the titration method calls for it. But I have never tried the intravenous ascorbate. My doctor says he has never given Vitamin C therapeutically. Medical school gives them training that does not include naturopathic methods for the most part. Do pumpkin seeds really help? I don't know but they are really good and I like them.

Ask yourself if you knowingly put carcinogens (cancer causing agents) in your mouth? Can you really take a carcinogen and rub it on the tail of a mouse and produce cancer? How do they determine what chemicals are carcinogens? The problem is all we have to do to violate the 1st commandment of Cancer is put carcinogens in our bodies. How we do that (put carcinogens in our bodies) is truly unbelievable by that which defines a sane mind.

Taking Any medication and understanding what it does are two different things. Are you supposed to know? If you start to investigate the first thing that will happen is you will be hit with some very very frightening information about the side effects of medication. Is this so you will give up your research?

Prostrate cancer is nil in Japan. So will you drink green tea? Take lots of hot baths? Eat more fish?


There always will be more questions than answers no doubt about it.

Will I take 12,000 mg of vitamin c a day as preventative maintenance? Yes and I will take Lysine with that so that collagen can be produced in all my body tissue that requires it. All I need is motivation what is the vitamin for that I wonder?

Last edited by genterprise; 01-20-2009 at 10:54 AM. Reason: grammar

 
Old 01-22-2009, 07:17 PM   #9
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Hello genterprise,

I can answer some of your questions, and I'm responding with comments in green. Jim


Quote:
Originally Posted by genterprise View Post
What happened to the Vitamin C therapy for Cancer? How did Linus Pauling, (who almost had 3 Nobel Prizes) stave off his Prostrate Cancer until he was 96 years old? Why did he have to prove the effectiveness of his therapy by taking 18000 mg. of vitamin C every day for more than 25 years?

I was not aware that Linus Pauling had prostate cancer, though I was certainly aware of his advocating vitamin C for the common cold. I have learned that he underwent radiation therapy for prostate cancer, and in 1993 he made a claim that vitamin C had delayed the start of the disease for twenty years. However, this was apparently just a totally unsupported assertion. His death in 1994 was due to prostate cancer.

Dr. Stephen Barrett, MD, has developed a reputation as an objective researcher of medical claims and as a person who carefully documents his statements. Dr. Barrett has extensively studied Dr. Pauling's career in advocating vitamin C, and he has concluded that Dr. Pauling was quite unscientific in his marshalling of evidence and deeply biased in his approach, specifically including his involvement with prostate cancer.

It appears to me that Dr. Pauling never had a paper on prostate cancer accepted for publication in a recognized medical journal. I say that based on a search of the US National Library of Medicine's website [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url], a site we can use on this board as it is sponsored by the Government. I searched for " prostate cancer AND pauling l [au] " and got no hits; that's very strong evidence of a lack of publication in any journal. If you have found such a publication, please give us the citation.

By the way, I learned years ago that vitamin C helped substantially to control some allergies, whose symptoms are often like the common cold. I suspect that's where Dr. Pauling got some of his strongest impressions about vitamin C and colds. I take a couple thousand units of vitamin C a day to help control allergies, and I sometimes increase that during heavy exposure to allergens. That's in conjunction with a medically supervised program now involving three drugs, after I finally graduated from having to have biweekly shots for several decades. For me the effects of vitamin C during allergy season, before I had advanced much in treatment by an allergist, were obvious and dramatic. I understand and agree that doses of vitamin C well over the recommended daily level can be helpful, but for me, 18,000 units would tear me up! (Dr. Pauling must have had some kind of constitution to stand all that vitamin C! He also must have made sure bathrooms were nearby, and I suspect he had a good ventilation system as well.


What kind of therapy was built on this after his passing?

I have been dealing with a very challenging case of prostate cancer since late 1999, and as a result of that I've become quite familiar with medical research on the disease. Unfortunately, despite a lot of money spent on trying to show that vitamin C was effective for prostate cancer, the results have been highly disappointing! It's possible that someone may find a way to make use of it for prostate cancer, but that sure has not happened yet!

You can research what is being done with vitamin C for yourself by searching [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url] for "prostate cancer AND vitamin C ". Here's a study that I think you will find interesting, even though it's discouraging ; it's the second hit, as of today, from the search: Vitamins E and C in the prevention of prostate and total cancer in men: the Physicians' Health Study II randomized controlled trial.
Gaziano JM, Glynn RJ, Christen WG, Kurth T, Belanger C, MacFadyen J, Bubes V, Manson JE, Sesso HD, Buring JE.
JAMA [Journal of the American Medical Association]. 2009 Jan 7;301(1):52-62. Epub 2008 Dec 9. You can read an abstract of the study by clicking on the blue hypertext.

This was a gold-standard type of intervention clinical trial: randomized, double-blind (neither participants in the trial nor the people they were working with knew whether they were getting vitamin E, Vitamin C, or placebo), large (14,641 men) and long-term (about ten years). Basically, their statistical results indicated, with a very high degree of confidence, that neither vitamin C nor vitamin E made a difference. (I can answer questions about the statistical results if you have them.)

Many of us are convinced, backed by research, that the wrong kind of vitamin E (alpha tocopherol) is typically used in these studies (instead of gamma and delta tocopherol vitamin E). I'm pretty confident that was so in this study. But I'm not aware that vitamin C has this kind of issue.

There is a real danger that some of us may put our faith in vitamin C for prostate cancer instead of chosing an approach that could actually do a lot of good!


... Can Ascorbate be administered intravenously to increase the amount of Vitamin C in the bloodstream? ...

Possibly intravenous vitamin C might make a difference, but it does not look promising to me. You could check [url]www.pubmed.gov[/url] for that.

Ask yourself if you knowingly put carcinogens (cancer causing agents) in your mouth? Can you really take a carcinogen and rub it on the tail of a mouse and produce cancer? How do they determine what chemicals are carcinogens? ...

There are sound, well established answers to these questions and to the broader, related question of how we can conduct research on cancer. But it would take a lot of time to answer them here, and I doubt it would help us much. You might try your local library and get help from the reference desk.

Taking Any medication and understanding what it does are two different things. Are you supposed to know? If you start to investigate the first thing that will happen is you will be hit with some very very frightening information about the side effects of medication.

One of my pet peeves is that so often we hear about a side effect but we are not told how common it is (what percent of patients develop it), how severe it is, or whether and how it can be avoided or minimized. That's very important information! You can find that if you read the fine print in the literature that comes with most drugs. Often we learn that most of the scary sounding side effects are rare, don't apply to patients like us, are not severe, or are preventable. (That's certainly the case with some of the side effects for my own therapy, intermittent triple hormonal blockade.)You can get the answers you want, but unfortunately it often takes quite a bit of work. Too bad.

Is this so you will give up your research?

I don't think so at all. I'm convinced those statements are made to inform us and because they are legally required.

Prostrate cancer is nil in Japan.

Actually, it is not nil. In fact, the Japanese do quite a bit of research on prostate cancer. However, the incidence is a lot lower than in the US.

So will you drink green tea? Take lots of hot baths? Eat more fish?

As you may know, Japanese and some other Asian men have a much lower incidence of prostate cancer, but when they migrate to the US, the incidence approaches US levels. That has stimulated a ton of research into diet and lifestyle differences. And yes, partly because of that research, I drink a lot of green tea (averaging at least eight bags worth a day), consume about 4,000 IU of fish oil daily, eat several pieces of herring daily and often have seafood for dinner. I also consume about 200 IU of soy in capsule form daily. All of this is supported by quite a bit of preliminary research, but none of it is conclusive.

...Will I take 12,000 mg of vitamin c a day as preventative maintenance? Yes and I will take Lysine with that so that collagen can be produced in all my body tissue that requires it. All I need is motivation what is the vitamin for that I wonder?
Okay, if it makes you feel better, but it pays to be aware that vitamin C for prostate cancer is not supported by research. If you really want to get into nutrition, exercise and stress reduction to help prevent prostate cancer and support treatment, including information on the degree of support for each tactic, try the excellent, highly readable book by Dr. Charles "Snuffy" Myers, "Beating Prostate Cancer: Hormonal Therapy & Diet."

I hope this helps,

Jim

 
Old 05-16-2009, 04:45 PM   #10
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 3
Photo HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

"Dr. Robert Leibowitz, a prominent medical oncologist specializing in prostate cancer, for many years has been adamantly opposed to soy for prostate cancer patients."

Apparently, supplements, nutrients, etc. are different for 1. reducing development of prostate cancer and 2. fighting existing prostate cancer, either first time or recurrent. I believe that Leibowitz's primary objection to soy products was/is in relation to men with existing prostate cancer.

No doubt he has been relatively alone in that opinion. However, just yesterday, the following was published:

<removed>

Last edited by mod-anon; 05-16-2009 at 09:26 PM. Reason: do not post copyrighted material

 
Old 05-17-2009, 12:20 PM   #11
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Photo View Post
"Dr. Robert Leibowitz, a prominent medical oncologist specializing in prostate cancer, for many years has been adamantly opposed to soy for prostate cancer patients."

Apparently, supplements, nutrients, etc. are different for 1. reducing development of prostate cancer and 2. fighting existing prostate cancer, either first time or recurrent. I believe that Leibowitz's primary objection to soy products was/is in relation to men with existing prostate cancer.

No doubt he has been relatively alone in that opinion. However, just yesterday, the following was published:

<removed>
Hi Photo, welcome to the board. I am especially glad to see that another fan of Dr. Bob's is participating.

Would you mind giving us the citation again? Giving just the citation itself would not create any copyright problem. It took me a while to get the hang of the way the board operates, but many of us have found it is worth the effort. I hope you will be back.

I am a huge fan of "Dr. Bob"'s (Dr. Robert Leibowitz who practices at Compassionate Oncology , but that does not mean I consider him infallible, and I'm confident he would not claim infallibility for himself. He published his views against soy for prostate cancer most recently, I believe, around Halloween of 2007, and I've looked at his paper.

In essence, he remained convinced at that time that soy was not wise for us because he saw that men who consumed soy and other over-the-counter (OTC) supplements had PSAs that rose more than was expected when they took a vacation from the heavy-duty hormone blockade drugs like Lupron and Casodex. He did not base his views on a detailed scientific study, and in fact, in an earlier paper or talk he mentioned that these OTC supplements often included flaxseed oil, which appears on its own to increase PSA in many men . (Note in contrast that ground flaxseed, with a far lower concentration of the oil and with lignans that the oil does not have, may have a beneficial effect for us, per preliminary evidence. ) Thus, you can see that his informal observations could have been picking up PSA rises triggered by the flaxseed oil or other OTC but not by soy. (He also relates what he thinks is an unwanted effect of soy on PSA to inadequate testosterone during the vacation period on intermittent hormonal blockade, but that line of thought is more complicated, and I won't go into it unless someone has a question about it.)

Dr. Bob does address several studies involving men, soy and prostate cancer in his paper, but I am surprised that he did not mention the key paper that has influenced many of us to consume 200 mg of soy per day. Here is the citation for the paper:

"Soy isoflavones in the treatment of prostate cancer."
Hussain M, Banerjee M, Sarkar FH, Djuric Z, Pollak MN, Doerge D, Fontana J, Chinni S, Davis J, Forman J, Wood DP, Kucuk O.
Nutr Cancer. 2003;47(2):111-7.

By the way, lead-author Dr. Maha Hussain, MD, is a highly respected prostate cancer researcher and physician, known for her expert research work.

Basically, the study found that a soy supplement at 200 mg per day was effective in stabilizing PSA in this Phase II study: 83% of patients who were responsive to hormonal blockade experienced stabilization, and 35% of patients who were no longer responding well to blockade experienced stabilization. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the rate of rise of PSA for the whole group.

Dr. Charles "Snuffy" Myers, MD, who many of us consider the leading physician expert on nutrition and prostate cancer (author of "Beating Prostate Cancer: Hormonal Therapy & Diet" and earlier co-author of "Eating Your Way to Better Health - the Prostate Forum Nutrition Guide," a former NIH researcher, a former Director of the U. of Virginia Cancer Center, with a large practice devoted to prostate cancer, and a prostate cancer patient facing a challenging case himself since 1999) had been enthusiastic about soy back in 1996 when he began publishing his newsletter, but he had grown cold toward soy due to the absence of supportive studies, which should have been fairly easy to do. He enthusiastically returned to favoring soy for us when the Hussain study was published.

I am disappointed that Dr. Bob, writing in 2007, did not address this 2003 study. I hope he will do that in the future. Jumping back to one of the studies Dr. Bob does discuss, he noted that conclusions were uncertain. Basically, that study finds desired effects for soy except for miso soup, which is soy based. Surprisingly, miso soup was associated with more aggressive prostate cancer.

(You can find an abstract of this study by searching for " hussain m [au] AND prostate cancer AND soy " on www.pubmed.gov, a site we can use on this board because it is Government sponsored.)

I looked for that article published on May 15, first checking www.pubmed.gov for " prostate cancer AND soy AND 2009 ", with limits for only studies with abstracts so I could read the key details plus only studies that involved clinical trials either of humans or animals. I got three hits, but all were quite favorable to use of soy for prostate cancer patients.

You were thinking whether soy might act differently for preventing prostate cancer versus for dealing with a diagnosed case of prostate cancer. While that might turn out to be the case, it looks quite unlikely to me, based on the body of evidence from research. It looks like soy probably helps both for prevention and for dealing with our cases.

Like many of us, I continue to pay attention to research on soy. While it is looking quite favorable overall, the picture is not yet completely clear, and, it may turn out that Dr. Bob is right, though I think that unlikely on the soy issue. Still, we have to place our bets with information that is somewhat uncertain. I've placed mine by consuming 200 mg of a soy supplement per day.

Take care,

Jim

 
Old 05-18-2009, 12:44 PM   #12
Junior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Clemente, CA, USA
Posts: 35
mudrunner HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

As I sit here at my computer smarting from my 16th radiation treatment to my head and neck for follicular nHL, jumping to this board, the ďnutritionĒ question peeked my interest. Itís basically the same one that pops up on virtually all the cancer boards. Iím now nine years out from my RRP with a PSA of zip. My personal course of action for ďcuringĒ any cancer is to find it early and cut it out! At this point, it seems I got lucky on the prostate and skin one, but hit a snag on the lymphoma.

Most of my intermittent on-line time is now spent on the Lymphoma Society boards, where I often see the same questions of nutritional supplements, cure inducing foods, etc. After years of reading posts on prostate, skin and lymphoma cancers I can say with some confidence that it is incredibly easy to get completely lost regarding solid proof of prevention or cure for any cancer.

IMHO, Jimís posts are always well researched and written. Even so, his opinions and observations are proffered relative to other (medically based) opinions and observations. This is in no way a criticism, as it is all we lay people can do.

At 66, perhaps senility has diminished my reasoning but my personal goal is to maintain a moderate course. Eat a sensible diet, stay physically fit and have regular medical checkups. Take early and aggressive steps to fight off any medical problems. Without completely discounting them, try to avoid, as much as possible, getting caught up in the minute details of the various ďargumentsĒ as to what current supplement or elixir will cause the cure.

Itís all very personal. I donít take any supplements and canít stand cauliflower. Would I have avoided all these cancers if Iíd been eating it all my life? Who knows? Could I avoid getting a fourth type if I started now? Who knows, but Iím not going to be finding that out either, because that stuff is just too vile for the experiment. Itís my choice, and Iíve made it and will live with it, until I donít.

 
Old 05-18-2009, 03:01 PM   #13
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 3
Photo HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Thanks for your warm welcome, Jim. Regarding the quote I had tried to paste into my post, it was published in PubMed last month, but I read it at * removed * a few days ago.

I just looked it up on PubMed by title: Identification of a Biphasic Role for Genistein in the Regulation of Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis

I have seen Oncologists at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, Dana-Farber and MD Anderson, and all recommended (when pushed for anything about nutrition) soy products. In fact, until I saw this study, the ONLY recommendation against it that I have seen was by Dr. Bob.

The idea of miso acting differently from other forms of soy makes sense, considering how fermentation completely changes soy's chemistry.

Dr. Bob also is alone (from everything I've read) in rejecting Omega-3 from fish oil as a supplement for men with PCa. Otherwise, I think he's pretty much on track with other docs who dare to suggest anything other than what the American medical establishment has been doing for the past 67 years (anti-androgens) and 100 years (prostatectomy in one form or another).

Last edited by hb-mod; 05-18-2009 at 03:17 PM. Reason: Please don't post links and/or instructions regarding commercial websites as per Posting Policy. Thanks.

 
Old 05-18-2009, 03:16 PM   #14
Newbie
(male)
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 3
Photo HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

By the way... I'd like to mention two other studies that seem to have melted into the cloud of history, but have influenced what I eat and drink and how I take vitamin C.:

1. Nonfat milk linked to prostate cancer - Posting Date: January 2, 2008
OncoLink, Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

2. Fat transforms ascorbic acid from inhibiting to promoting acid-catlysed N-nitrosation Online First Gut 2007; doi: 10.1136/gut.2007.12857

 
Old 05-18-2009, 08:02 PM   #15
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Annandale, VA, USA
Posts: 1,730
Blog Entries: 3
IADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB UserIADT3since2000 HB User
Re: Does Anybody Believe In Fighting Prostate Cancer With Nutrition?

Hi mudrunner,

I'm putting some comments in green in response to your thoughtful and reflective post. Jim


Quote:
Originally Posted by mudrunner View Post
... At this point, it seems I got lucky on the prostate and skin one, but hit a snag on the lymphoma.

That's sure a great result for the prostate, and I wish you well on the lymphoma.

Most of my intermittent on-line time is now spent on the Lymphoma Society boards, where I often see the same questions of nutritional supplements, cure inducing foods, etc. After years of reading posts on prostate, skin and lymphoma cancers I can say with some confidence that it is incredibly easy to get completely lost regarding solid proof of prevention or cure for any cancer.

So many products are hyped by manufacturers along with foods and special treatments hyped by self-proclaimed experts that it is tough for us survivors to separate the wheat from the chaff. Often survivors will be very enthusiastic about a particular food, supplement or special treatment but with no solid basis for their enthusiasm. That is not altogether a bad thing, as hope and optimism seem to be beneficial in themselves.

IMHO, Jimís posts are always well researched and written. Even so, his opinions and observations are proffered relative to other (medically based) opinions and observations. This is in no way a criticism, as it is all we lay people can do.

I agree. I feel confident in the approach I take to choosing supplements and foods, but I am aware that my methods do not guarantee success. I thought you might like to know more about how I think about these issues. If not, then thanks for at least reading this far.

The soy issue that just came up is an excellent example; even Dr. Myers was not confident about whether soy was wise until he reviewed the Phase II study by the Hussain team, and my impression is that, while he favors consumption of soy at 200 mg of the isoflavone daily (not just 200 mg of the supplement that contains it and other elements), he would probably not be completely surprised if a larger Phase III trial resulted in contradictory findings. However, the key Phase II soy trial was well conducted by a highly respected lead researcher and institutional team, and the results were quite encouraging. That and Dr. Myers' endorsement were enough for me.

Flaxseed oil is another excellent example, with Dr. Mark Moyad favoring it for us, at least until a few years ago, in contrast to staunch opposition by Dr. Myers and some other leading experts (including Dr. Walter Willet, a highly esteemed expert from the Harvard School of Public Health). Dr. Moyad is considered at least fairly expert in nutrition issues for prostate cancer, so his disagreement with Dr. Myers and others regarding flaxseed oil and prostate cancer creates an unwelcome clash of "experts" to us survivors. Personally, I appreciate Dr. Moyad's attention to nutrition and feel he does much good, but I'm convinced Dr. Myers is head and shoulders above Dr. Moyad in nutritional expertise for our disease.

That's not a criticism of Dr. Moyad; rather, it's just that I'm convinced that Dr. Myers is extraordinarily talented in this area. I can add detail why I think Dr. Myers is so talented if anyone is interested. Basically, it relates to his own education, his work as a researcher for NIH, his subsequent medical practice, his rare expertise in evaluating research and experimental design, his professional network of other experts, his knowledge of nutrition, prostate cancer, and cancer and disease in general, as well as his own experiences as a patient facing a challenging case of prostate cancer filtered through this unique set of qualifications.

Here are some approaches I consider key to separating the wheat from the chaff regarding foods and supplents (and treatments too). First, there are several books about nutrition and prostate cancer, and there is fairly broad agreement among the ones that are clearly respectable and not overhyped claims for exotic approaches.

Second, we are no longer operating in a vacuum of research; much research has already been done on many of these foods and supplements. Well, that could aid our doctors and other medical professionals, but we need access to that information if we are going to use it to make empowered decisions for ourselves with help, perhaps, from our medical team. Fortunately, thanks to our US taxpayer dollars, the National Institutes of Health provides an online version of the National Library of Medicine, and we layman (or anyone else, including professionals) can access it as www.pubmed.gov, a site we can use on this board because of its Government sponsorship. We can search for such things as " prostate cancer AND soy ". At the least, we can gauge the amount and recency of research, but we can also read and try to understand the key parts of the abstracts we find, as well as the occasional free copies of complete research papers. Often our laymen's educations and common sense will make the right course pretty clear.

Third, there are almost always studies that come down on one side of the issue with other studies on the other side. But this is a critical point: that does not mean the evidence is equal! While that "even-handed" approach is too often what we get from the media, frequently it is clear that the evidence is far stronger on one side than the other. Often it's simple: there will be many more studies, and much more credible studies on one side than the other. Sometimes there will be well-done, large studies or actual clinical trials on one side, as well as animal and laboratory studies, versus just animal studies or laboratory studies on the other side. (Lab studies are good, but animal studies are more persuasive to me; animal studies are good, studies in humans are a lot more convincing.)

Sometimes the evidence on one side is from highly regarded, expert, reputable sources, where the opposing evidence is from researchers who do not have much experience or whose credentials are weak. Sometimes we can notice that brilliant researchers, like Linus Pauling, will be convinced something like vitamin C is a cure for many of the things that ail us, but they will be caught up in their own mistiques, and we laymen can observe that they are making pronouncements in fields where they never had real expertise. (How many times have we seen Hollywood stars come to believe they are experts on world problems? We are smart enough to see through that, and we can sometimes do it with medicine too!) This is what I think is happening with Dr. "Bob" Leibowitz's objection to soy; he is a great observer and I greatly admire him, but he is not an expert in nutrition, and he does not claim that his assessment of soy is based on careful research, just on his informal observation.

Or sometimes there is terrific bias on one side, such as in the long and temporarily successful but ultimately losing battle by the tobacco industry to confuse the public and even scientists and doctors about the awful health risks of their products. I believe we see this in some of the support for flaxseed oil for prostate cancer patients - a lot of money at stake in the flaxseed oil industry, with likely danger to prostate cancer patients - us! - not mattering that much.

And sometimes the science on one side is just plain poor, as in the statements by some commentators that two recent studies were evidence against the worth of prostate cancer screening, despite the clear fact that the length of follow-up time in both studies was woefully inadequate to measure survival impact in a screening study (among other flaws). These studies were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, which is a highly respected "peer-reviewed" journal. You can almost take what is said there to the bank, but not quite. Sometimes, we need to trust our wits and shout out that the emperor is wearing no clothes! (Actually, the papers in the NEJM and an accompanying editorial were a lot more concerned about the limitations of those studies than you would have thought from media reports. That's another guideline: take media reports with a huge grain of salt!)


At 66, perhaps senility has diminished my reasoning but my personal goal is to maintain a moderate course. Eat a sensible diet, stay physically fit and have regular medical checkups. Take early and aggressive steps to fight off any medical problems. Without completely discounting them, try to avoid, as much as possible, getting caught up in the minute details of the various ďargumentsĒ as to what current supplement or elixir will cause the cure.

For many of us, what you describe is about the best we can do. I happen to have studied experimental design and statistics intensely in college and graduate school, and most of my career has been involved in procurement of major projects involving scientific research, and therefore involved with researchers. That plus the "luck" of having a challenging case of prostate cancer has made my case interesting to researchers, and that's helped me get invited to medical research conferences. It's kind of an odd background, but it has prepared me to deal with prostate cancer research with a good deal of confidence, separating much of the chaff from the wheat quickly.

Some of us don't have that background but have a gift for evaluating people and what they are saying. Others have had the good luck to have learned from great teachers or to have great doctors who really know what is going on. Some of us have stumbled upon books by authors who have special gifts in guiding us to better choices as we go through the maze of alternatives. My point is that if we have a special asset for coping with this disease, we should use it, and many of us feel we should help each other.


Itís all very personal. I donít take any supplements and canít stand cauliflower. Would I have avoided all these cancers if Iíd been eating it all my life? Who knows?

Actually, I think we do know, or could know if we put in some effort - not 100% certainty, but sure enough to guide our choices. It's comforting to think that lifestyle choices probably don't make much difference, or that it is too hard to figure out what is best, but I don't think we can any more let ourselves off that hook. Consider this: it's now crystal clear that smoking is dangerous. We accept that. Well, we don't have evidence quite that conclusive for obesity, lack of exercise, and many of the things we eat, but the odds are getting longer and more one sided with every passing year. I would love to eat a well done steak every week or so, but I don't because to me the evidence is fairly strong that that is dangerous for prostate cancer patients. Yes, the evidence is not conclusive, but it's strong enough that I know which way I am going to bet when my life is at stake!

Could I avoid getting a fourth type if I started now? Who knows, but Iím not going to be finding that out either, because that stuff is just too vile for the experiment. Itís my choice, and Iíve made it and will live with it, until I donít.
Your reaction to cauliflower brought to mind what Dr. Myers, perhaps our greatest advocate of lifestyle tactics to support our battles with prostate cancer, said about seaweed when he tried the macrobiotic diet shortly after being diagnosed with his own challenging case of prostate cancer. In the current issue of his Prostate Forum newsletter he wrote: "You are right, the macrobiotic diet is very difficult. We tried it shortly after I was diagnosed and the smell of cooking seaweed was too much for my wife." But there are many nutritional foods that appear favorable for prostate cancer patients, so you are almost sure to be able to find a cuisine that you like. Personally, I think it's worth the effort.

Anyway, that's my two cents worth. I think I'm on the right track, but remember that I'm a guy who wasn't convinced I should get screened until I was 56. By then it was almost too late for me. Obviously, I haven't always made the right choices despite all that scientific background.

Jim

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Just diagnosed with Prostate Cancer Richard Richard Cancer: Prostate 13 09-03-2011 12:51 PM
Hurray for finasteride (Proscar) - the medical community finally does the right thing IADT3since2000 Cancer: Prostate 13 06-06-2011 06:57 AM
chemoprevention of prostate cancer medved Cancer: Prostate 16 11-16-2009 04:49 AM
what does cancer look like on ct scan kra53m Cancer: Prostate 6 08-26-2009 11:15 PM
Selenium for prostate cancer - growing more complicated IADT3since2000 Cancer: Prostate 1 08-03-2009 06:13 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Casodex
Cialis
Cipro
Flomax
Levaquin
  Levitra
Morphine
Proscar
Tylenol
Viagra




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Tall Allen (174), IADT3since2000 (148), Baptista (97), Gleason9 (28), harpman (27), Johnt1 (22), honda50 (9), tumbleweed (6), flyfisher37 (6), GUAMJOHN (5)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1004), Apollo123 (905), Titchou (848), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (759), ladybud (754), midwest1 (669), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:35 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!