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Old 10-28-2004, 02:47 PM   #1
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shue HB User
Dyspraxia

Anyone have any experience with this disorder? Can dyspraxia and apraxia overlap? Are coordination issues always present with dyspraxia? Behavioral problems linked to either or both disorders?
Any input will be appreciated.
I am a mom and kind of between SLPs right now and looking for some information. If anyone has any books that they recommend on the subject that would be great too.
Thanks.

 
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Old 10-30-2004, 12:57 AM   #2
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Re: Dyspraxia

My youngest son has Apraxia of Speech. When you are talking about speech, Apraxia and Dyspraxia are the same thing. They both refer to praxis which is the application and exercise of learning. In this case, the learning would be speech. Dyspraxia is seperate when talking about other parts of the body though. A child can be uncoordinated and be considered dyspraxic. Since both conditions are neuroligically based, they can overlap.

One thing that is important to point out is that it is very common with children who have verbal apraxia to also have sensory issues. My son is very clumsy and can be aggressive because he doesnt process sensory input the way most children do. He also has the diagnosis of Sensory Processing Disorder.

Most books on Apraxia are very clinical but you can do a search and find a few. A great book about sensory issues is called "The Out of Sync Child" by Carol Kranowitz.

I am always around if you ever want to talk kids
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Old 10-30-2004, 05:52 PM   #3
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Re: Dyspraxia

Yes, she has been evaluated for SI and needs a lot of vestibular stimulation. What is unusual (apparently) is that she is incredibly coordinated. She has been hitting the ball (and in great form) for over a year. She is great with catching, kicking, golf, croquet...everything like that. She shines among her peers, but then if she needs to do something that requires two actions...she can't. For example, she cannot open a door. If it requires her to turn and push, etc. She is stumped. Weird? I don't know.
I've read "Out-of-Sync," but when I did, I had my other daughter, who has autism, in mind. I guess I need to re-read it thinking of Beans.
Have you read anything/heard anything about nutrition and allergies and speech disorders? I saw a book on Amazon that looked interesting, but it could easily be a crock too. I am loathe to buy and be disappointed, KWIM?
I am trying to figure out what behavioral issues are most common with pre-schoolers with this speech issue. We are kind of at a crossroad trying to determine if we need to have her formally evaluated for ASD as well. She is so different than her sis, and I have always said, "NO WAY!" to the idea of her having ASD too. She has had the eye contact, sociability, and has always been at least somewhat more flexible than her sis, but man her receptive is looking less and less good, and while she is much less echolalic than a few months ago, she still uses it. I don't know.
Thanks for the input though. I'll go look for my book.

 
Old 10-31-2004, 07:23 AM   #4
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Re: Dyspraxia

The door thing is not weird at all. It is an executive action which kids with Apraxia and SID together usually struggle with. Here is how it was explained to me. Exeutive thinking is basically thinking in steps. First you do this, then you do that type of thing. Children with both conditions usually struggle with this. They know they need to brush their teeth for example but they can't figure out the steps of going about it. That is wonderful that her coordination is so good!! My thinking is that it would mean that that part of her brain is functioning as it should. How are her fine motor skills?

I know what you mean when you are dealing with two kids. I now have both of my boys ,2 and 4, in therapy but the 4 year old just started. We just looked at him as an anal kid who was a little different. We started researching for the youngest and a lightbulb went on.

I took the youngest to a Dev Ped because I knew he had ASD. I got all of the books and had planned how things would go. Turns out that he doesnt have ASD and isn't on the spectrum. Our Dev Ped told us that Apraxia and SID together can present as ASD because their symptoms combined can mimic it. When you break things down in to such areas as cognitive thinking you see the difference.
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Last edited by Mommyof4; 10-31-2004 at 07:24 AM.

 
Old 10-31-2004, 09:14 AM   #5
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Re: Dyspraxia

Interesting. Thank you for sharing your experiences. How is the youngest's behavior? Emma Jean is so emotional. She loses it pretty easily. She responds to most adversity with weeping and wailing and gnashing of teeth, LOL. Well, not really LOL, that is how she responds. New situations are really hard on her. She wants to please big time, but because (I think) she doesn't process information that well, when she doesn't know what is expected of her she has serious anxiety. She is good at compensating and is a quick study, so she often fools teachers, and me too, into thinking that she understands directions. Then if anything changes, she gets upset again. It is also really frustrating because sometimes she does totally get it then the next time she won't, so I end up thinking she is just being stubborn a lot of the time, at least I did before we had the apraxia dx. She is smart as a whip and has a sunny disposition as long as things are copescetic. Last night she shocked me by reading all of the lowercase letters in a new coloring book and spelling out "rainbow." She and her sis have both known their alphabet since 18 months, and have been writing letters for months now, but I didn't know she knew the lowercase letters. The girls are twins, BTW.
Can you please elaborate on what you mean by cognitive thinking?
Thanks.

 
Old 10-31-2004, 09:45 AM   #6
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Re: Dyspraxia

Cognitive thinking is how a person perceives and understands the world through interaction and influence. It's basically understanding how things work through experience. You know that is an area that many ASD children struggle with. Just from what you have said, her cognitive thinking seems to be in place as she feel the need to perform or please. She also sounds like she has an insecurity about not being able to do it right so she compensates for it by acting like she understands.

My youngest is very aware of the world around him and what people expect. He refuses to talk in front of people because he is becoming aware of the Apraxia. He stills gets very upset when people don't understand him, gets very shy in crowds, and has more energy than any of us know what to do with. My oldest son sounds more like your daughter in his insecurity. He knows what people expect and expects a lot out of himself. Then, if he can't do it, he gets upset. Daily, I am having to calm him down about something. What finally made me take him to the OT that my youngest see's is that he started saying " There's something wrong with me" I was told that insecurity doesn't usually start this early.

I went through feeling realy bad for my oldest as I shudder to think of all of the times he got into trouble for the way he was. I knew he was stubborn and kept trying to break him from being so rigid. Now I know that he is tactile sensitive so he doesnt like for people to touch him, likes to be held on his terms, has to have either bare feet or socks and shoes...No in betweens, etc.

Has she ever had an eval with an OT? That is probably where I would start. Talk to you soon
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Old 10-31-2004, 10:00 AM   #7
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Re: Dyspraxia

She was. Her sis' OT, who is wonderful, did one as a courtesy to us. It pays to be good customers, LOL. Anyway, she did not do many tasks that she is capable of because she could not understand what the OT wanted and about halfway through, she got all clingy and wouldn't do much at all unless I was right there, and even then....It surprised me since she has a relationship with the OT already. I can't remember what all it said that she needed, but she scored "at risk" more than she did "deficit" in all but vestibular, if I remember correctly. In some areas she was fine. I am not sure about her fine motor skills. Her grasp is better than her sis', her writing looks really great. I think she is pretty on-target for her age. They are 3 1/2, they'll be 4 at the end of December.
She is definately a perfectionist. She'll try something new, but if she doesn't get it pretty quickly..that's it.
She has a real flare for the dramatic and makes up songs and learns things by music too. I just can't believe that she might be on the spectrum, too many things don't fit, but several things do fit too. Your description of your son is the closest parallel to her behavior that I've come across so far. Does he/did he scream and yell and carry on?

 
Old 10-31-2004, 08:46 PM   #8
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Re: Dyspraxia

He still screams. I honestly worried about Aspergers with him because he didn't have the language delay. He also has problems in most areas but an unusual knowledge about dinosaurs. He can tell you names, what they ate, that they're extinct, etc. He also has an unusually long attention span. He can sit and watch a full length movie and never move. That's my oldest son

My youngest son is very hyposensitive in so many areas. He is orally hyposensitive and is a very picky eater. He has to be crunching on something all of the time as soft foods cause huge power struggles. He is hyposensitive to pain so we never know when he is hurt unless it's a biggy. He is having a hard time right now adding his consonants back into the words. He wants to only use the vowels which makes him harder to understand. He never notices when he is dirty but is very sensitive to what other people notice. He hates attention but loves to sing to himself. He talks to his sister's dolls and has a great time unless other children are playing with him.

The main thing that is helping with both boys is to have them take time outs. Not the kind where they are in trouble but the kind where they go to recharge. They have a tent that goes over their bed that they get in to be all alone. It's almost like a wave with both of them. I can see it swelling and know that if I don't do something, they are going to explode.

That's great that she has seen the OT. I agree, I wonder if they give group discounts??LOL Is there a chance that some of her bahaviors mimic ASD because she deals with this in her family and it affects her twin? I wonder about that as kids learn most things through other kids. Talk to you soon
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Old 10-31-2004, 08:50 PM   #9
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Re: Dyspraxia

I definately think there is an imitative element at work, but Abby has made huge strides behaviorally. Of course, she has been in ABA for 34 hours a week for months now, as well as the OT, etc. At this point, Emma Jean's behavior is more unmanageable than her spectrum sister's and more frequently.
We are trying to get a SI intensive set up and then we will follow up at home with a SI diet. There are just only so many hours in a day KWIM?
I really appreciate your input and how nice to be answered so expediantly.

Last edited by shue; 10-31-2004 at 09:16 PM.

 
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