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Old 10-03-2011, 11:28 AM   #1
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How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Hello All,

I recently saw my GP for constant aches, pains and tender spots in the areas of my neck, back, shoulders and jaw. She ran some tests to check for autoimmune diseases and did x-rays, but said that she didn't see anything more than inflammation in the neck area. She then referred me to a PT clinic who is known for commonly doing myofascial release treatments.

I had my first appointment on Thursday and the therapist said that he would work on a very small area at each appointment. The treatments were going to be painful, but I should expect to feel results in (hopefully) just a few sessions. During the first session he worked on the area directly around my neck, and almost immediately he discovered a couple of trigger points. While he pressed down on them with his thumb, it was very painful. He kept that hard pressure on each spot until the pain subsided from say a nine to a three, or the lowest that it was going to get. Then he did short slow strokes on the main target area and it was extremely painful. He kept having to remind me to breathe, or at least take long deep breaths because I was doing something similar to panting. I had tears in my eyes and towards the end I could feel myself shaking. I wanted to curse, but I didn't so I would just gasp out from time to time.

He said that it was not uncommon for bruising to occur, but I couldn't tell if there was any because he also taped the areas. I looked online about that and saw that it was kinesiology or myofascial taping? It was very sore for several days afterward which he also told me to expect. I went home that night and was instructed to ice on and off for awhile and drink plenty of water until my next appt.

I'm just wondering if there are different types of myofascial release methods, and if so does it just depend on the particular client's needs? I've seen some massage therapists advertise their release therapy to be relaxing with soft pressure and this was by no means anything similar to that. I am supposed to go back for a second session on Wednesday. How do you know which treatment is the right one for you? Thanks so much!

Last edited by maiyen; 10-04-2011 at 12:50 PM.

 
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:47 PM   #2
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Some people need release that hard, but for me, I find that if myofascial release is THAT painful, it irritates the muscles so much that they just knot right back up again!

For me, about a seven is the most pain I'll tolerate during a massage. At that level, I can continue to breath steadily if I concentrate on it.

One trick I've learned over the years is that all the muscles in the body are connected. If one spot is too painful to work, long strokes on a neighboring area might just release it without pain.

 
Old 10-04-2011, 10:19 AM   #3
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

honestly, i have been getting amazing results with my type of myofascial release now for almost like four years, and with NO PAIN at all. there ARE different forms in which one is called "indirect"(the type i get but works in an amazing way to simply release the muscle and tissue that ARE the generating/pain creating part as it radiates outward to other muscle groups if not halted, or good old "trigger points') and the direct form which sounds very much like what you recieved. and jane IS very right in how she described what would pretty much be a 'rebound effect" from THAT much inflammation added to the problem already CAUSED by basic overstim TO muscles fascial covering(TPs) and inflammation you already have forces. it just really does not even sound at all really 'logivcal either,ya know what i mean? replacing one form of real inflammation with another?

while indirect uses NO tools or thumbs or elbows or whatever else that therepist decides to or simply 'can' use use(trust me here that they just CAN use ALOT of different body parts and "tools' with the direct, but it does also tend to generate more pain too(and you should NOT ever ever have 'bruising' either from myo release). the indirect uses ONLY your OWN electromagnetic field that gets forced back into your body that DOES release that wadded up fascia. hence, release of fascia which is what is myofascial pain.

everyone carries there own electromagnetic fields(it IS electrical current/synapses and water that just 'run' our bodies pretty much in a basic way afterall), and when there just is any from of inflammation, it DOES get even higher and hotter. my therepist can actually feel my field/higher tone and i can feel it too(as he is pushing it back down 'into' me with only a hand above me. just checking tone not the actual therepy itself) when he just lays his hand like almost two feet above my body. my inflammation is insane along with a VERY high level of sympathetic nervous system damage that is my sympathetic 'tone' too, from spinal cord injury. the biggest thing that convinced me that this WAS the exact therepy i needed soo flippin badly was when, only after five sessions with this therepist, two seriously nasty TPs that i had been carrying around under my R shoulder blade for almost a decade that nothing or no therepy could EVER actually get rid of, he did. well over ten years of hell under that b;lade among all the myo damage i aquired from a surgery that they had to go in from posterior down into my actual cord that damaged the living hell outta a ton of major muscle was also calmed down at LEAST two to three points as well.

now, at this point i just see him for 'tune ups'. my c spine is now an ongoing and deteriorating flippin mess and litterally falling apart. but i just KNOW that after a good session, which involves him only lying a hand or hands on the area he is t rying to relaese and our bodys actually do the real work, i will walk out of that office with a very noticable lessening of my upper back thru neck pain.

no really helpfull and just 'good' therepy, even TP release should be leaving ANY marks at all, esp bruising around the area worked on(that just really IS a form of vascular damage). i 'used to" get this when i was trying myself, using only a tennis ball inside a tubesock either under me while i laid on it onthe floor and moved it around or up against a very solid wall and pushing under that icky shoulderblade area WAYYY too hard. its breaking the smaller cappillaries that lie directly under your skin in how this 'therepist" is simply doing this to you, and it should NOT at all be occuring. now using less force with a 'rollaround' of like that tennis ball just NEVER ever has done this since i was told just how to really utilize that ball so i did NOT generate my own brusing to that worked on area. i truely think you need to find a myo release therepist(considering the bruising along with ungodly pain and suffering that does NOT have to happen with the right therepies is just even occuring) and try the indirect therepy approach like i get. it just IS that amazing in how it just works, and more importantly, what it has done for my totally myo damaged upper back thru my neck area too.

all YOU actually feel is the lying of a hand pressure and then little fasiculations, or very light spasming as your OWN energy does that release simply by that therepists hand(s) just forcing your own energy back into that area that DOES actually relaese itself. ijust soo completely would recommend this indirect approach to anyone. thats how much it has really done for me and my mess and do believe this so totally worlks, and without pain and suffering and esp that sick bruising too. the key here tho is the therepist simply having the overall experience where they really can just 'feel' what is eminating from anyones body.

you CAN check your own electro field by simply placing your hand about 8 to 10 inches from your own face, then slowly move it forwards towards your face(with your eyes shut)? you will reach a point where within around 3-5 inches where you can actually feel that 'pushback' of real solid energy going back into your face. this is just the MOST highly innervated and easist place to actually even feel your own field. but for your own sake, please DO try and fine a good experienced myo release therepist who actually does do the indirect method. my therepist also combines what is called craniosacral therepy too which really helps keep a good regulation of what should be the very natuarl ebb and flow and regeneration of our CSF within the dura that surrounds both the cord and the brain together in one very long sac? this helps to also decongest our duras too among other great stuff. this just IS amazing in what this has done for me and my pain levels mostly. you just should NOT have to suffer with myo release at all. good luck,and i hope this helped some.marcia
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11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
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Old 10-04-2011, 12:49 PM   #4
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Well, I really appreciate both of you responding and the information that you provided. It seems that you both do better with the indirect method and unfortunately, I am entirely new to this so I guess I just didn't ask the therapist good questions while I was there. I have tried rolling a tennis ball on the areas that are sore, but I have found that it is too painful on the really tender spots. So I just try and lightly massage there, if I can.

After myofascial release therapy, do you feel any improvement in the actual trigger points? It has been five days, but the 'points' that the therapist really dug into still feel really tender, just as they did prior to my session. Almost more tender than they were before, perhaps they could still be a little sore? However, the therapist stated that he was going to work on a different area during each session and I can't imagine these areas feeling any better without anything else being done to them. I'm supposed to have a second session with him tomorrow. After hearing what you have both said, I'm wondering if this therapist is just not the right one and I should cancel and find someone better suited for me? Would the GP think that I'm not serious about the pain because I didn't complete my treatments and she was the one who referred me to him? Finding relief seems so complicated sometimes...

Thanks for your help, everybody.

 
Old 10-04-2011, 07:11 PM   #5
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Oh, I had to try a LOT of therapists to find the one that was right for me. The treatments I need aren't covered, but without them I won't be well enough to work, so I find the money.

For self-massage, the same principle applies. Near the nasty trigger points, there might be tight cords. Try pushing one of the cords back and forth. It can "pull" the trigger point right out. If you're lucky, it actually dissolves!

But if no amount of manual therapy relaxes the trigger point, there is something called a trigger point injection. It's basically massage with a hypodermic needle. A doctor has to do it, because the needle is placed quite deep. Those, sometimes they hurt sometimes they just feel weird, but the pain just lasts a moment, and, if the doctor hit exactly the right spot, the trigger point just DIES for weeks.

 
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Old 10-04-2011, 08:49 PM   #6
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

That is helpful and encouraging information. Unfortunately I wasn't able to cancel tomorrow's appointment in time because I ended up working later than I had hoped so I will just have to hope for the best. I will try and feel around for that tightness that you mentioned and see if I can find any tight cords.

May I ask if trigger points and the presence of muscle pain could possibly point me in the right direction of trying to figure out what all of this is since my GP couldn't give me any answers? A few people suggested that I get a second opinion so I scheduled an appointment with a rheumatologist (although it will be months before I can see the doctor). I have also been reading about myofascial pain syndrome and fibro, but they both seem to be somewhat inconsistent. Meaning that some people get diagnosed with one by having just a few sore spots in certain areas and other people cannot get diagnosed even though they may have a whole list of symptoms, pains, etc. I'm just not sure where to find any answers at this point.

Thanks again.

 
Old 10-08-2011, 10:53 AM   #7
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

i really do not think you need a 'second opinion' in THAT sense as much as you simply HAVE to find out exactly what IS the ongoing generator of the creation of trigger points in your upper area. 'something" is almost always behind the scenes so to speak that generates signals of inflammation TO that fascia covering which then(the outter fascia) will simply first, thin out, then clamp down pretty hard AROUND that muscle and tissue creating the underlying TP for you to have to suffer with.

having ONLY an X ray really shows nothing as to what is actually going on down in the other spinal layers and thru and into the spinal nerves and cord itself(x ray generally will only show harder boney structures). it just does not have the capability. but getting what would be the best at this point as a 'contrasted MRI" done on at least your c spine area(this usually also shows about the first three or four T spine levels too) would hopefully show what YOUR particular underlying TP generator just is. you really cannot 'appropriately treat" what you or your treating docs do not even know is there. or in your case, what IS generating your myo pain and the horrid TPs that just come along for the ride whenever something is generating ongoing inflammation.

it is all kind of an ongoing "process" when that "something", that could be something that is simply intermittantly hitting a spinal nerve or any of a ton of other possibles one can just have that creates that inflammatory response that creates a signal out to the fascia/muscles that that particular area or sensory/motor nerve just innervates in a repeated way. once THAT signal sending starts and goes on without being stopped, it WILL do what i explained above with the surrounding fascia clamping down, usually first one area of muscle and tissue too that if not released, will continue to involve other muscles within that group because "they' too are now getting the radiating out signals from your now painful TPs as well. this whole process can result in sooo many different areas of TPs and myo inflammation until that 'thing' gets Dxed and the TPs simply DO get released as well. right now, you have muscle and tissue that are kind of beging 'held hostage" up there.

i know jane mentioned the TP injections? have you ever tried this? i have had litterally hundreds done from the mid point/upper base of skull l on down thru my c spine and under my blades over the years i have been dealing with these suckers. it is kind of a 50/50 shot with those. alot really depends upon what is generating the TP(if old from trauma, usually better results becasue that ongoing generator is NOT continuing to stimulate it) but if this is still being 'fed" and kept in the clamped posistion from something that IS there and sending signals in a consistant way, the chances go down a bit, but it can help to try and reduce them too. the TP injections are something that i would at least give a good try just to see how many are 'old' but have not simply ever been released so they CAN leave, and what ones are still left behind after the injections are done. i HAVE gotten "some' to go away using the injections but the nastier ones like the suckers under my blade never ever would go anywhere til the indirect myo release was started. still freaks me out that THAT therepy did what no other of MANY different therepists or therepies could do for those two ugly TPs.

so what happened at your last visit with that therepist?

i would seriously have a talk with your primary here about getting an MRI or at the very LEAST a CT to better see into that area that IS simply sending out signals from 'something' in there. but by far, and MRI that will also see into the cord and nerve levels would be soo much more ideal in finding whats going on in that area.

while you 'could' possibly have fibro, you may not. this particular 'label' of a condition at times when a doc really cannot attribute your TPs to something esp that he has NEVER even scanned with MRI yet(the MRI NEEDS to be done in order to simply even rule out other possibles/differentials before 'diagnosing" any patient with this or any condition that can be from other causes FIRST), can be falsley given just so it can have a label and you get a mis diagnosis too. there just IS NO definitive real like true 'test' for fibro like there is for other types of diseases and conditions, so it can at times be the" last resort" type of diagnosis too. so always keep THAT in mind too. with certain conditions that only show in certain ways that simply CAN have other reasons for THAT particular symptom to even be there, everything that it even 'could be' just HAS TO be ruled out with 'proper testing' first. that is how the diagnositic process just 'should work' but not always done unfortunetly. lazy docs do not help either. any Dx is simply test and rule out any and all possibles BEFORE arriving at any true even possible Dx. and that is most definitely what YOU need here. not only the best therepy(indirect myo release) to try and at least clam down what may regenerate like mine do since MY c spine is constantly inflammed for alot of reasons(TP reformation totally depends upon the underlying generator creating the signal to fascia/muscle), but actual deeper scanning just to see if anything IS there that would never be picked up on just plain x ray too. many many different things just CAN generate TPs when certain things are in or going on in any area of the levels of spinal that would 'feed' the nerve to THAT particular muscle. you need rule in rule out before anything here. just my opinion in dealing with many other things that can cause inflammation, including a glob of blood vessels that grew inside my spinal cord(i was born with that glob already there) i had no clue was there at all UNTIL i had an MRI done for a herniated disc. THEN it showed. that stupid glob was actually what had been generating those two ugly never go away TPs under my blade too. thats why those two were sooo horrid and radiating out 24/7 non stop pain after a bleed it had.

you just really DO need to see whats up at the FULL c spinal levels(down into cord) with the best possible scan for that, and that IS the contrasted MRI. but i would ask your doc about sending you out for the TP injections too since these can work, or at least minimize ones that are very active. and any 'old' ones that never got released after some type of trauma done or injury would more than likely be gone with TP injections. these are actually done by an anesthestiologist usually at some form of pain clinic or facility. i hope this helped. sorry it took so long to just get back to you hon. i was without a PC until i could buy a new one,then get it set up. the other up and died on us or i would have gotten back sooner, sorry bout that. marcia
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Old 10-08-2011, 07:58 PM   #8
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

I just have to put in my two cents worth. I used to get trigger point injections. Don't know why the doctor stopped doing them. One time he "hit" a trigger point and he and his nurse were shocked by how much the muscle jumped when it released. That felt really good! Unfortunately it didn't last.

 
Old 10-08-2011, 08:13 PM   #9
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Oh, yeah, the "jump" is pretty funny! With the upper back, the doctor can often SEE it. The lower back, the muscles are buried deeper under fat and connective tissue, so the patient can feel the jump, but other people can't usually see it through the skin.

Believe it or not, I actually get a little giddy after the injections. It's not the drug, because the only thing in the needle is a drop of local anesthetic. I think it's just the emotional effect of the relief of pain.

 
Old 10-09-2011, 09:09 AM   #10
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Hello All,
No, I haven't done any trigger point injections. I just went to a GP not to long ago and she couldn't figure out what was causing the aches and sore spots so she wanted me to try a few sessions of PT. There has never been any mention of an MRI or injections. She told me that if the PT didn't offer any relief then we should get back in touch.

I went to another PT session last week and it was pretty much a repeat of the first one. I was under the impression that we would be working on a different area each time, but I guess because there was no improvement from my first session he worked on the exact same area again. The pain was excruciating and although he knew I was in a lot of pain, he wasn't going to let up on the pressure. He just told me to hang in there...keep breathing. The next day, my muscles felt more sore than the first session and there was a burning feeling on my skin, as if I had a sunburn. Although that finally went away the tender spots are all still there. I don't know if there are more trigger points because he didn't work on a different area. I am supposed to go again on Monday, but I cancelled the appt.

I called the GP's nurse to ask what plan B is because I felt that the PT sessions don't seem to be helping and the message back to me from the doctor was that she wants me to see a rheumatologist since the aches and pains seem to be muscular. That's pretty much where I'm at. I've seen a podiatrist for aching in the arches of my feet, but other then that, those are the only doctors that I've seen lately. I can't get in to see the rheumatologist for a long time, so I'm just trying to learn what I can on the interweb for now. Thanks, everyone.

 
Old 10-09-2011, 09:14 AM   #11
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

from what my PM told me when i asked long ago(very first ones) what was in the injection he was about to do with the TP one, he said there is maricaine along with some level of alcohol added too. i guess the alcohol is what actually works moreso on the wadded up muscle to try and release it/break it down, while the maricaine simply numbs it(at least a few hours of heaven, huh) with as you mentioned above jane, the local anesthetic. i don't know if this is like the "standard' with TP inj, but this is what my particular PM uses for them. it does make sense tho since muscle WILL react/inflame to a certain degree to alcohol when injected directly into it. hence the need for numbing while it hopefully 'works itself out'. who knows. as long as it works, wonderful.

i keep wondering just what an actual steriod inj(small amount)right into a TP wad would do?? i wonder if they even do that. just a ponder. marcia
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3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
Old 10-09-2011, 09:22 AM   #12
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

First step, make the rheumatologist appointment. Then, if you haven't already, talk to your GP about bloodwork. The rheumy will definitely want bloodwork to test for inflammatory diseases, lyme disease, and certain nutritional deficiencies, and it'll be more efficient if you go with lab results in hand already.

IF you have the money, you can try to find a massage therapist on your own, one who practices techniques that work a little better for you. Mine costs about $70 per hour.

It's really hard to say how to find a good one. Definitely, someone who is licensed in your area, but that's just the first step. I've found that Asian therapists tend to push harder and leave bruises, but that may just be my experience rather than a true cultural difference. The best way to find out is to make a half-hour appointment and see what happens. Do speak up during the treatment, a good massage therapist should listen to you.

Also, there is a book called the "Trigger Point Therapy Workbook" by Davies and Simmons. I can't recommend it enough. When I first developed chronic pain, my mother bought so much junk trying to help me! This book was the only thing that I got any use of.

 
Old 10-09-2011, 09:23 AM   #13
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Feelbad: Sometimes my injections are lidocaine + tiny drop of steroid. It works pretty well. In my neck, I only get about a week of release, but in my back I get longer.

 
Old 10-09-2011, 11:59 AM   #14
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

Hello,

I did make an appointment for the rheumatologist. Unfortunately, the one that is highly recommended around here doesn't have an opening until February so I'll be hanging out for awhile until that time comes (unless I can find someone else who I can see sooner). I just don't want to see just anyone if it will be a waste of my time. I've had my fill of too many doctors where my appt ended up just like that. But I'll keep looking and maybe I'll find someone else that's recommended that doesn't have such a long wait time.

My GP did do some lab tests because she originally thought that maybe it could be an autoimmune disorder. I did one round of lab tests, and the nurse called to say that due to one or some of the results, the GP wanted me to come back in for more testing. So I went in again to get more blood drawn and then the nurse called again to let me know that everything was fine? That's when she said that the GP wanted to refer me to the PT. I tried to ask why the doctor wanted me to come in for additional testing in the first place and she was unable to tell me. But I don't know what all I've even been tested for.

It's been somewhat of a frustrating experience because the communication has been lacking. I am used to doctors giving me copies of test results, nurses being able to fully answer questions or if not, getting those questions referred to the doctor and then the doctor following up. And because I do have financial constraints, I don't want to go in for another appt with the GP if she's just going to say that she'd like to refer me to a rheumatologist, but not provide me with any information.

I'll look into the book that you mentioned, janewhite1. As always, thank you all so much for your feedback. It is most helpful.

 
Old 10-10-2011, 08:30 AM   #15
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Re: How Painful is Myofascial Release Supposed to Be?

maiyn, the first thing you NEED to do here since the nurse nor the doc bothered to take the time to even TELL you the 'whys' in why you even had to have a repeat set of bloodwork and what was actually 'off' enough"(you simply need to know what "specific' labs were 'not right") to even prompt that is get ALL of your ongoing medical records from this particular doc and make certain to mention ANY and ALL blood test results too or any other types of reports from them as well. you simply DO have a right to your own medical records and test results from ANY doc, hosp or facility that sees you or tests you.

the test results themselves are simply NEEDED, but also obtaining ALL the 'clinic notes' made by your doc that are mandatory after every single visit they just have with any patient that get transcribed and placed into your file also can reveal info about you too. like what 'they feel" is possibily going on, and also why that doc reordered the bloodwork too. it should ALL be in your medical records/file. and you do NOT have to make ANY type of actual appt just to obtain all of your records from ANY doc. all you have to do is call the docs office and tell them you need a copy of your medical file including any and all testing results. then they send you out what is a 'release of information' for you to just fill out and sign and send back to them(tell them, on that release that you need/want all clinic notes AND any and all testing result copies). in usually about a week or so, all of those needed records pop into your mailbox. its that simple, and all done over the phone. i have been doing this for many years now with me and my sons medical records with each and every doc/specialist we have had to see. the test results i ALWAYS obtain right away tho(as soon as they become availiable), esp both of our bloodwork results and scans of any kind(or x rays too).

once you can just get your hands on all that info, some things will hopefully make much more sense to you. this just does also tell you alot about what that doc is thinking about your overall situation(they HAVE to also give their overall 'impression' of what the patient is dealing with too in those clinic notes, and that is usually more insightful than anything else for the patient) and how really seriously she is taking things with you too. and just whether or not any doc just really 'gets" where WE are at and what WE feel too. it can be a little goldmine of info for some people whos docs esp do not explain things really well to their patients. just an FYI for ya hon, if this doc does not actually explain anything to you, you may want to try and find a much more hands on and caring primary. they ARE out there. you simply DO have the RIGHT to actually 'know/be told' specific things that it sounds like you are NOT getting at all from this current one you have been seeing. just a thought for ya.

if you obtain the copies of those labs and could post here what the first set stated and the second, i can help, and others too to better define what any out of range lab or even something that is on the higher end of the norm ratios could indicate. with both sets. there had to be something that prompted your doc to have you to come in again that you were NOT even told about specifically that you just did and do have every right to know and should have been explained by someone BEFORE that second set was even drawn for. then seeing what changed with the second draw would help to know as well. something was either out or range(higher or lower than the norm ratios), not right that 'possibly righted itself' when they did the follow up. or nothing actually changed so she is sending you to a rheumy doc now and you STILL do NOT know what those blood tests contained or where your numbers were/are. and THAT alone is just soo not right. just knowing where our lab numbers are at can help us to know what can be becoming impacted as far as organ function or metabolic issues too, among other specific things.

do you recall just what was tested for initially? if you were not EVEN told THAT much, you seriously DO need all of the records availiable to any patient in their medical file to see/read thru yourself. as i mentioned above, i do this full record pull at least once a year with all my specialists and primary and my pain clinic too, just to see what they feel about my conditions and if they are even understanding where I personally am just 'at"in MY thinking about my conditions too. it DOES help us to better understand things as well. like why ANY specific testing was ordered, and most importantly REordered??

just give them a call today and ask for their medical records dept and they will take it from there. all you have to tell them is you want these records and esp the test results for your own personal medical files you keep at home on yourself. alot of people do this so it really wont pose ANY type of real problem for anyone to simply want to see and read thru their own records and see test results. depending upon how long this issue has been going on would kind of dictate what dates to put down on that form that will ask you from when to when do you want the records from. or depending how long you have had this primary, you can state ALL records from the beginning/initial visit to present.

just so you know, once you sign that release, it is automatically good for one year so if you need to obtain anything else, you can just call them and ask and will not have to fill out that form again til next year. or you CAN always also ask your doc for ANY copies to be made of any recent test results she is going over with you right then and there. she can get that copy done ASAP before you even leave her office too. just some stuff you need to always obtain from any doc you see, but esp from her right now. just getting the recent bloodwork and the follow up would help alot to try and help you. marcia
__________________
3-22-01,herniated C-6-7
11-20-01,placement of hardware for failed fusion
9-22-03,removal of cavernous hemangioma that was inside spinal cord. Neuro damage to L hand L leg and R leg.

 
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