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Old 02-14-2004, 11:19 AM   #1
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PuppyPuke HB User
Composite Filling Pricing

Hi. I have not had a filling in years and I need plenty. Now I would like to know the price range for a composite filling. Seems where I live everyone charges such outlandish fees.

 
Old 02-15-2004, 06:14 AM   #2
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Doppler4000 HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

My dentist charges anywhere from $90 - $140 for a composite resin filling- depending of course on which tooth, which surface, etc.

 
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Old 02-15-2004, 09:01 PM   #3
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Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Composite fillings are more expensive than silver, but if you have dental insurance, the insurance company will pay what a silver filling would cost, and then you pay the difference. The price range quoted is about right, but keep in mind that they don't last anywhere near as long as the silver, and it usually isn't recommended unless it's for a filling that is seen when you smile. Also - and I know this because I have a couple - they may be white but are still noticeable, just not as noticeable. These will not match your teeth, if that's what you're thinking. So unless there's a reason why you want these, they won't be as invisible as you may think.

 
Old 02-16-2004, 08:52 AM   #4
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rhody HB Userrhody HB Userrhody HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

My eight white fillings match my molar teeth. The only way you can tell any differences, is to get a few inches away and you can barely (and I mean barely) see subtle color differences. My white fillings have been in for a little more than 10 years with absolutely no problems. I believe that I had porcelain, which is quite durable. I understand that there's quite a variety of white dental restorations materials available. I haven't researched this recently, but I would imagine that there must be greater choices than when I had mine placed in my teeth.

About ten years ago I paid somewhere around $2500 to "change-out" 8 fillings from mercury-silver dental amalgam to white. I paid approximately $1000 out-of-pocket, and the insurance paid the rest - which was the price of the mercury fillings. This is all from memory and the pricing is rough. I hope that helps some.

Note to anyone that hears the old-style gray-black fillings called "silver" from their dentist or other persons, that "silver" fillings are composed of approximately 50% mercury. Silver in the mercury-silver dental amalgam typically is a much smaller amount. I hope the U.S. congress passes the bill HR 1680 to allow consumers to receive this important data every time we visit the dental office, so we don't just think that we are getting silver fillings - that are just silver. Eventually, also these mercury fillings may be banned in the U.S.

Maybe, with a larger interest in white fillings, that manufacturers will provide us with even better and more economical choices. I also hope that these manufacturers review the toxicity of these white fillings, so that we don't have a repeat of problems that we had with mercury fillings - when the mercury constantly leaked. We don't want organic compounds leaking also, if it might cause any risk to health or allergic reaction.

I would suggest that people considering white fillings, try to choose the best materials, that are the strongest. It might be a few dollars more, but for the long run, if it means no problems, you might want to get those. Review the porcelain variety and see if that fits what you are looking for. I had mine put in my teeth in a two step process (between separate dental visits). First they created a mold and I got a temporary filling. Then an outside lab made the white filling. The dentist cemented in the white filling on the following dental visit. I believe that this was done over a three month period. Now, that I know more about mercury fillings, I wonder if the dentist purposely set my dental visits far apart, because he knew I had reactions to these amalgams and most likely the mercury inside them. I went to a naturopath to test any allergies or reactions that I may have to these gold and/or white dental restoration materials, and got those that seemed most compatible. I had tests also for the cementing agents.

My dentist did a super job. I think finding a dentist that knows a lot about this type of cosmetic dentistry is important. I also might mention that it was my own decision to have these fillings replaced. I just decided to do it, since I had a great increase in muscle pain and headaches after one tooth broke and exposed a mercury-silver dental amalgam. Over the years, I've slowly recovered from devastating pain and suffering.

 
Old 02-16-2004, 11:52 AM   #5
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Re: Composite Filling Pricing

There is no way in hell I'm going to get ugly silver fillings. Sorry it's just too tacky. My smile is important to me. I never said composities would be invisible but golly at least they are not black looking. Metal fillings are so stone age in comparison to what the dental industry has now. I plan on having a couple major fillings porcelain which nicely coincides with the appearance of ones teeth. The rest will be composite.

Last edited by PuppyPuke; 02-16-2004 at 11:56 AM.

 
Old 02-17-2004, 01:50 PM   #6
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blj97 HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhody
My eight white fillings match my molar teeth. The only way you can tell any differences, is to get a few inches away and you can barely (and I mean barely) see subtle color differences. My white fillings have been in for a little more than 10 years with absolutely no problems. I believe that I had porcelain, which is quite durable. I understand that there's quite a variety of white dental restorations materials available. I haven't researched this recently, but I would imagine that there must be greater choices than when I had mine placed in my teeth.

About ten years ago I paid somewhere around $2500 to "change-out" 8 fillings from mercury-silver dental amalgam to white. I paid approximately $1000 out-of-pocket, and the insurance paid the rest - which was the price of the mercury fillings. This is all from memory and the pricing is rough. I hope that helps some.

Note to anyone that hears the old-style gray-black fillings called "silver" from their dentist or other persons, that "silver" fillings are composed of approximately 50% mercury. Silver in the mercury-silver dental amalgam typically is a much smaller amount. I hope the U.S. congress passes the bill HR 1680 to allow consumers to receive this important data every time we visit the dental office, so we don't just think that we are getting silver fillings - that are just silver. Eventually, also these mercury fillings may be banned in the U.S.

Maybe, with a larger interest in white fillings, that manufacturers will provide us with even better and more economical choices. I also hope that these manufacturers review the toxicity of these white fillings, so that we don't have a repeat of problems that we had with mercury fillings - when the mercury constantly leaked. We don't want organic compounds leaking also, if it might cause any risk to health or allergic reaction.

I would suggest that people considering white fillings, try to choose the best materials, that are the strongest. It might be a few dollars more, but for the long run, if it means no problems, you might want to get those. Review the porcelain variety and see if that fits what you are looking for. I had mine put in my teeth in a two step process (between separate dental visits). First they created a mold and I got a temporary filling. Then an outside lab made the white filling. The dentist cemented in the white filling on the following dental visit. I believe that this was done over a three month period. Now, that I know more about mercury fillings, I wonder if the dentist purposely set my dental visits far apart, because he knew I had reactions to these amalgams and most likely the mercury inside them. I went to a naturopath to test any allergies or reactions that I may have to these gold and/or white dental restoration materials, and got those that seemed most compatible. I had tests also for the cementing agents.

My dentist did a super job. I think finding a dentist that knows a lot about this type of cosmetic dentistry is important. I also might mention that it was my own decision to have these fillings replaced. I just decided to do it, since I had a great increase in muscle pain and headaches after one tooth broke and exposed a mercury-silver dental amalgam. Over the years, I've slowly recovered from devastating pain and suffering.
Rhody I believe you had crowns done to have a temporary on they dont do temporary fillings for composites. also amalgam fillings are stronger than composites.

 
Old 02-17-2004, 03:42 PM   #7
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Re: Composite Filling Pricing

I had one crown from the tooth that broke (you are right about that - I now remember - and I can see it because of the small line of metal support underneath). The other seven are (I believe) porcelain material. I would have to ask my dentist because it's been about 10 years when I had it done. The other seven are definitely not crowns. The dentist explained to me quite clearly at that time that he had to make a mold when he drilled out the mercury fillings, and then plug in a temporary filling (which fortunately did not come out during that short time). The mold was sent to the lab to make the precise permanent white filling. When I returned to the dentist, he cemented this permanent filling in. This dentist pratices cosmetic dentistry and is very good at what he does.

My white fillings have been great for a little over 10 years...so far. I hope they last longer. We'll see.... I guess dentists won't really know, until they put in a lot more and are time tested. So without being time tested with the latest and greatest durable "white filling" materials how can they make statements about something they really don't know a lot about? These are so much newer and modern than the old-style metal fillings, so I think we really don't know as much as we'd like people to think we know.

 
Old 02-17-2004, 03:56 PM   #8
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Re: Composite Filling Pricing

I did some more quick reading about it. It sounds like I had porcelain inlays. Porcelain inlays are done in a two step process, like I had done.... I'd have to read more to be sure and ask my dentist, but that seems most probable.

 
Old 02-17-2004, 06:02 PM   #9
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Doppler4000 HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Quote:
Originally Posted by blj1974
also amalgam fillings are stronger than composites.
This is misleading. A bonded composite resin filling is generally believed to result in a stronger overall tooth structure immediately and over time when compared to amalgam or silver fillings.

 
Old 02-17-2004, 08:07 PM   #10
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Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Hi all again,

I did some more reading. It's been a while since I researched this. There's been so many changes....

First, from what I can gather porcelain inlays are considered much stronger and last longer than composites (in general) by a large margin. That statement may create some differences in opinion, because there's so many varieties.

I read that composite fillings are a plastic mixture, combined with glass. Porcelain is a non-crystalline glass (SiO2), that's normally more difficult to place in one's teeth. It's considered wear resistant and has high compressive strength. It's not a good heat insulator, although. At least one person felt that the best non-toxic "white" fillings would be formaldehyde-free composites or porcelain. Before getting composites, I'd research the various types. Porcelain, it appears, is very biocompatible for us (at least according to one source).

Another source claimed that Celay (TM) porcelain fillings are the strongest in the world. Well, they may be strong, but who's to say who's the strongest without lots of research (that may have been an advertising pitch). But, anyway there apparently are better porcelain fillings than others, but it seems that porcelain is the best white filling (in general). Celay porcelain is preferred by some cosmetic dentists. I'm more impressed, the more I read about certain porcelain fillings. They apparently bond very well to the tooth and some claim actually strengthen the tooth. As a crown, porcelain can be used too.

Composites may be getting better all the time, from what I understand, so don't count them out over porcelain. In summary, all I can say, is do lots of research and make a sound choice. We can no longer say for certain that amalgams fillings last longer over these new materials. We know these amalgam fillings emit toxic mercury, and it will be a grand day when we can say good-bye to those ugly metals forever, so that we can have better cosmetic natural tooth-colored fillings. Welcome to the 21st century! What we knew yesterday, can change by what we know now, in just a matter of a few months or years. Yes, how much it costs is important, but in my opinion if it costs a little more to get fillings that last, fillings you like to have and are non-toxic, it's money well spent in the long run.

Last edited by rhody; 02-18-2004 at 12:56 PM.

 
Old 02-19-2004, 06:22 AM   #11
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blj97 HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doppler4000
This is misleading. A bonded composite resin filling is generally believed to result in a stronger overall tooth structure immediately and over time when compared to amalgam or silver fillings.
I worked in a dental office for 2years, from what I experienced I am almost positive that amalgam are stronger.

 
Old 02-19-2004, 10:26 AM   #12
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SouthernTemptress HB User
Re: Composite Filling Pricing

Bj you missed the point. As she said: "resin filling is generally believed to result in a stronger OVERALL tooth structure". That is true because with amalgams much more of the tooth has to be taken out to put in the filling. With resin fillings, not much of the tooth has to be taken out for the filling, which in result keeps the strong structure of the tooth intact.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blj1974
I worked in a dental office for 2years, from what I experienced I am almost positive that amalgam are stronger.

 
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