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Old 04-21-2012, 08:52 PM   #1
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ANewsom79 HB User
Full mouth extraction

So i'm 32 yrs old. I have 29 broken,decayed,or just a lil bit bad teeth. My teeth were perfect up until my 4 pregnancies now they are forever giving me pain and emotionally bad because people automatically assume i'm a drug addict or etc. Right now i'm am typing this from a hospital bed because I was admitted yesterday for Cellulitis of the face this being the 3rd time in about two years this time it has caused swelling to even attack my leg due to it being a bacterial infection. All the doctors that have come in to see me have all said that when this infection is gone (which let me tell you means tons of IV antibiotics and pain which even 2cc's of morphine ain't touching) That I need to have oral surgery to remove the teeth before I get a infection that turns way worse. First i'm deathly afraid of dentists don't like anyone looking in my mouth touching my teeth etc. B:If I have them done how good of a idea is immediate dentures because I really can't handle the thought of no teeth at all. C: My current partner is willing to pay for this all to be done because he is scared of everything medical that has been happening to me,But I would feel absolutely horrible about him paying.
I'm very confused and scared and the only person I knew who had gone thru all this is my mother but she passed away in 2005

 
Old 04-22-2012, 08:09 AM   #2
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Get it done while you are in the hospital. They can put you under anesthesia and you won't feel a thing. Immediate dentures are the normal route to take when dentures are your future. If your gums are not too swollen right now they could take impressions, make your dentures in the lab and have them ready for the oral surgeon to insert before you leave the operating room. Yes, it is a scary prospect but death is even scarier. Good luck with the procedure, you will be glad you did it.

 
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Old 04-22-2012, 09:09 AM   #3
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Re: Full mouth extraction

I would consider that but they do not do oral surgery at this hospital. But thank you for the reply.

 
Old 04-22-2012, 03:06 PM   #4
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Re: Full mouth extraction

I had to think about this before answering.

Your situation sucks! My first thought is that you should get a second opinion before pulling teeth, to make sure it is your teeth not something else causing this serious infection.

My second thought is that if you need that much dental work done, and are that traumatized by even the though that maybe getting them pulled at once might be easier? With lots of Valium so you don't care?

If I were in your shoes the first thing I'd do is get better, then get a second opinion. I'm truly sorry you have been through so much, and I'm more sorry everyone accuses you of a drug problem (not that it matters, but they shouldn't jump to conclusions about your life).

Also, I believe only the assessed/infected teeth would need to be removed.

Finally, part of your SO being in your life is helping each other out. You would do it for him, so you should allow him to help you. We all need a little help from time to time, so don't feel bad. If you watched him go through this you'd beg him to allow you to help him.....

 
Old 04-22-2012, 10:41 PM   #5
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Oh i've seen like 3 doctors over the last couple of days and even I know that it is time for them all to go. But on a better note the swelling is almost fully gone and down to two more days of IV antibiotics. And yes I would do anything for him but the quoted prices we have had so far are close to 10 grand because I do not have dental insurance so it's just really pricey.

 
Old 05-02-2012, 10:22 AM   #6
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Unfortunately, as far as I can tell all dental insurance is pretty lame. Every policy I've had for the last several years maxes out at $1500 annually, and some have a lifetime max that isn't much higher. So don't feel bad about not being insured; it honestly wouldn't help that much.

As far as having the extractions goes, I just had mine done three weeks ago at a place that specializes in it. Yes, I got an immediate denture. I'm only 40, and the thought of walking around toothless was not okay with me. Before that I had years of problems because of an autoimmune disorder (essentially I have very little saliva, which has caused lots of dental problems).

I am going to get implants, but if I weren't, the course of treatment would go something like this: extractions, immediate denture that day. A few checkups over the following two weeks. Soft liner at about two weeks post-op to make them fit better. New soft liners as needed until several months down the road, when you're all healed up and ready for your permanent denture which should not need a soft liner. (My SIL works at the place I went and explained it to me.)

Now, I am going to have dentures for several months before my bone is ready for the implants (I had bone grafts), and I won't lie. It's been challenging. The lower plate especially is annoying because it likes to pop up when I try to eat. However, I have a small mouth, not very deep gums in the first place, and then I had a lot of bone loss, so other people might have it easier than I do. Also I might be pushing it as far as eating is concerned. Probably I should stick with the softer stuff for a while ... but dang, you get sick of pudding, ya know?

But the pros:
first, I have a prettier smile. No, I have a pretty smile. Even when I was young and my teeth were in good condition, they were kind of crooked and a bit yellow, with an uncorrected overbite, so I always felt a bit self-conscious about them. When they started decaying, I felt really self-conscious about them. I haven't truly smiled in a photo in years. I'm kind of in love with my smile now. Even though it still looks a bit funny because of swelling and the soft liner and the fact that they set the teeth a bit low in the denture (which will be corrected in a few months) ... even then, this is still the nicest my smile has ever looked.

Second, the pain. Basically, there wasn't much at all! I did take the prescription ibuprofen they gave me for inflammation, but I didn't even get the narcotic script filled. Never needed it. And my mouth was in pretty bad shape, with lots of abscesses. Gentle salt-water rinses nightly and this stuff called Sock-It (I think) which numbed the gums were all that was required. They did miss a root tip and had to go back in to get it a week or so later, and that hurt a bit more (during healing; you can't feel a darn thing during extractions because you're so numbed up), but mainly because that sucker was hanging on for dear life and the dentist had to yank a bit.

Third: I don't have to worry about what I'm going to do about my teeth anymore. I already know. It's such a weight off. I was also worried about what my bad teeth were doing to my general health, and now I don't have that worry.

I can't give a huge amount of advice because I'm so new at this myself, but I just wanted to let you know that even though the first few weeks after dentures is challenging and can be a little disheartening—they feel so weird at first!—it gets a little bit better every day. And it's way way better than what you're going through now.

Also I just wanted you to know that I have heard of lots and lots of women losing teeth during pregnancies. It's because of the extra calcium required at that time, I believe. You're SO not alone.

 
Old 05-02-2012, 11:55 AM   #7
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Babies do not take calcium from the mother's teeth. That is a biological impossibility.

 
Old 05-02-2012, 02:19 PM   #8
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Quote:
Originally Posted by riptoff View Post
Babies do not take calcium from the mother's teeth. That is a biological impossibility.
Hmm, I never took it like that. I always assumed it was more like your own nutritional needs are higher at that time, and the body does leach calcium from bones if it needs it. But I haven't done a lot of research on it either way.

 
Old 05-02-2012, 11:18 PM   #9
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Re: Full mouth extraction

Teeth are connected to the blood circulation via the pulp and the periodontal membrane. If the baby was taking the mother's calcium it would come from these areas. The crown is not connected to the circulation and any loss of calcium from there is due to the bacteria in the mouth metabolising sugar to acid thus causing decay.
There is no doubt that changes occur in the mouth during pregnancy due to hormonal issues, but these are mainly seen in the gums.

 
Old 05-21-2012, 07:01 PM   #10
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Re: Full mouth extraction

According to the ADA

Quote:
It is a myth that calcium is lost from the mother’s teeth during pregnancy. The calcium your baby needs is provided by your diet, not by your teeth. If dietary calcium is inadequate, however, your body will provide this mineral from stores in your bones. An adequate intake of dairy products – the primary source of calcium – or the supplements your obstetrician may recommend will help ensure that you get all the calcium you need during your pregnancy.
It's very easy to have a calcium deficient during pregnancy. It doesn't take it FROM your teeth persay, but it definitely affects it in the long run. That's the way my dentist described it to me.

 
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