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Old 07-10-2012, 12:21 AM   #1
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Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

Hiya from about October last year I have been having treatment for periodontal disease that was pretty advanced and have had 2 courses of deep cleaning to try and stablise the disease, and a whole knew lesson in cleaning my teeth to help keep the disease from getting worse. Since November I have been suffering with extremely sensitive teeth and was prescribed duraphat toothpaste to use in my new teeth cleaning routine. I'm not sure if it the same time as the change of toothpaste or the start of the treatment but I have since been suffering with a terrible thirst and drink lots of water which doesn't always help, also feeling of dry mouth and my saliva has changed to feeling really thick and stringy. I've had blood tests for thyroid, glucose, full blood count, and liver function test and they have all come back clear. The dentist still says I'm producing saliva and does not believe me and my symptoms. She said maybe it was down to stress as I'm worried about my oral health and trying to keep my teeth due the the perio disease. I am in the process of trying different toothpastes, I'm on my 3rd brand and it has not made any difference. Can someone please help me to treat the symptoms I am displaying or point me in the right direction to get someone to believe me. Thanks for any input. Tara

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:04 AM   #2
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Re: Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

Are you taking any medications, does that toothpaste contain alcohol? Is it just after brushing that you feel a dry mouth or is it all of the time?
The toothpaste you have been prescribed has a high fluoride content which is supposed to treat teeth sensitivity. It says it can be locally applied on a tooth to presumably relieve sensitivity or more likely - a toothache from a cavity. While that may temporarily work on some cavities, it does not help on a tooth which has been exposed due to gum recession, simply because there is no cavity. In that case the soft dentin layer is constantly exposed and visible, there is no protective layer of enamel below where gum is supposed to be, so the closer you are getting to the nerve chamber the more sensitive your teeth become. To summarise - this is why your toothpaste is not helping with your sensitivity. Your teeth should adapt and become less sensitive to exposure with time.
The amount of saliva produced and its content can vary and may change with the use of certain medications or under certain medical conditions, and your dentist probably knows that but does not have any interest in helping you truly fight the disease. What you could do for yourself is follow a good hygiene regime. You don't want to treat symptoms (because this is exactly what dentists do and always fails), you want to overcome the diseased condition. I assume you already brush at least once per day, the most important time to do your oral hygiene is at night, just before bed, and not long after your dinner or supper. The use of tape floss or interdental brushes can help you, although you can substitute those with an oral irrigator, which does a much better job, as long as you feel comfortable with it.
What is truly important for you right now so you can actually start fighting the disease instead of only managing it, is to start a new diet which consists of natural foods only. Naturally grown vegetables and fruits, meat and organs from naturally bred and fed animals, high quality fish products, wholegrain foods as well as natural products with high fat content like milk, cheese, eggs etc. None of those should be in any way refined or processed. Going back to the natural way of living, deserting the man-made food will help your body get the necessary amount of vitamins, nutrients and minerals it needs to be healthy and to recover.

 
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:19 AM   #3
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Re: Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

Hiya, Thanks for reply to my thread. I am not taking any medication at all and the dry mouth is many times of the day, I have also woken in the night having to have a drink of water. I will have to check about the alcohol content on the toothpaste. I am very thirsty now and have drunk half a bottle of water and it has not made any difference it feels difficult to swallow my saliva? I clean my teeth twice a day once after breakfast and about 2 hours before I go to bed, I use disclosing tablets once a week to make sure I am cleaning my teeth as well as possible. I use tepe brushes 5 different sizes now to allow for the spaces between my teeth due to my gums receeding back, an interspace brush and an electric toothbrush. I have stuck religiously to this routine since october and the pockets have improved except the back teeth that still have pocket sizes of 7-9. I do not get bleeding from my gums now which was a normal occurance. I have been on a low fat diet which consists of lots of fresh fruit and vegetables for about 18 months now, I also quit smoking over 6 years ago, so I believe I am trying all stragegies to help myself. I would also consider myself quite healthy and active and do not suffer with general ill health. I have always attended dentist every 6 months and have had the same dentist for about 8 years, I am receiving treatment through our dental hospital and just wish I had the knowledge of oral hygiene years ago and maybe the loss of bone structure I have wouldnt be so advance.

 
Old 07-10-2012, 11:42 AM   #4
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Re: Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

I also consider myself quite healthy, especially compared to most people who eat junk food too often. But in reality i know i'm not because most of the food we ingest is too processed and refined without our knowledge. The meat is usually from animals who have been on a bad diet, and not grass-fed, which makes them and their production unhealthy for us to eat (in the long run yes), grain foods are also highly refined and processed. Most of the vegetables and fruits are not naturally grown and chemically enhanced. I think you get the idea, so instead of us taking a lot of vitamins and minerals we ingest a lot of toxins and unhealthy food. Not to mention the additives to enhance certain foods or drinks. I know the UK has strict laws about food/beverage content being written on the label, making the customer aware of what is being consumed. That still doesn't include the techniques and processes of making the food and how the important and vital vitamins and minerals are being extracted during those procedures. So even if you're trying to be healthy you still don't quite know what exactly you're ingesting.

Interdental brushes could be good, but in some cases, might actually even do more damage - eventually widen the periodontal pocket (if it doesn't get enough space it will eventually make it). So if you have the means you should perhaps try the oral irrigator since it cleans better anyway.

I can't further comment on your unusual thirst, you'll hopefully find someone who can seek the true cause of that. But you know receiving a lot of fluids is good for you, especially if they are like purified water or something similar. One thing that comes to mind is diabetes - usually starts with thirst and drowsiness - so mention that to your doctor to rule it out just to make sure it's not that.

 
Old 09-09-2012, 07:51 PM   #5
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Re: Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

Tara:
Try a mouthwash called biotene.
Periodontal disease goes hand in hand with dry mouth.
Hope this helps. It did for me.

 
Old 09-09-2012, 08:01 PM   #6
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Re: Can Periodontal Disease cause Thirst and dry mouth feeling?

Tara,
Dry mouth and thirst can be a symptom of Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease that affects your salivary glands and sometimes lacrimal glands causing dry eyes. It can also cause dry vagina, joint pains and other symptoms. It can be tested for by blood work (antibodies SSA and SSB) or sometimes a lip biopsy. It is treated symptomatically. The lack of saliva can cause both cavities and periodontal disease, not the other way around. Your Dr could check you for it or a rheum if your Dr prefers. Only 70% of people with Sjogren's test positive on blood work, so it is not fool proof, but something to look at.

 
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