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Old 02-06-2004, 01:28 PM   #1
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sweethendrix HB User
Exclamation Lifespan of us lucky folk????

Greetings...

I'm new to this board and this is my first post... after reading many threads here this morning, I have become quite impressed with the quality of information and the kindness expressed by y'all. I've gotta sensitive question for ALL of you, as I believe collaborative opinions are beneficial, whether diabetic or not.

I've researched this topic extensively on the internet, and it all says that our lifespan is the same as non-diabetics (although more than likely not free of related health issues during the lifespan), if not only 8-10 years shorter. This is a hard opinion to believe, even considering the insulin (apparently) has become of better quality in the recent years due to the apparent mass takeover and illegality? of natural pig insulin in the US. Why? Seems like it's kind of related to the fact that many people haven't lived an entire lifetime using these new insulins, therefore making data non-existent.

I have researched many topics on diabetes, but some info is just hard to obtain or understand... any help with the pig thing?

I have to admit I'm a bit of a 'hippie' for lack of a better category, and shooting this **** into my skin day after day still makes me a bit ill. Kind of like I'm cheating fate and the 'natural' order of things by utilizing Western medicine to extend my stay here.

Since I have been diagnosed (about 2 1/2 years now, at age 26, same diagnosis age as my father who is alive), I've had a splenectomy, thyroidectomy, and a young son to join our family. The spleen 'spontaneously lacerated' (without ANY trauma) and the lumps in my neck were an obvious one. Now, with two kids and a whole lot of wondering, I'm a bit scared as to my supposed time left here.

I guess I've got some sort of autoimmune deficiency thing going on here. I'm not one to be lifted by shallow remarks trying to stay positive or whatever, but I would like to know if anyone else is in a similar situation physically?

How the hell do you deal daily with all this? Does it ever NOT go through you mind every hour of your days and nights?

OK... probably too long of a post for anyone to want to browse, but if you did, thank you and I look forward to your ideas!

Last edited by sweethendrix; 02-06-2004 at 01:32 PM.

 
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Old 02-06-2004, 03:10 PM   #2
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Posts: 52
jman53 HB User
Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

Quote:
Originally Posted by sweethendrix
Greetings...

I'm new to this board and this is my first post... after reading many threads here this morning, I have become quite impressed with the quality of information and the kindness expressed by y'all. I've gotta sensitive question for ALL of you, as I believe collaborative opinions are beneficial, whether diabetic or not.

I've researched this topic extensively on the internet, and it all says that our lifespan is the same as non-diabetics (although more than likely not free of related health issues during the lifespan), if not only 8-10 years shorter. This is a hard opinion to believe, even considering the insulin (apparently) has become of better quality in the recent years due to the apparent mass takeover and illegality? of natural pig insulin in the US. Why? Seems like it's kind of related to the fact that many people haven't lived an entire lifetime using these new insulins, therefore making data non-existent.

I have researched many topics on diabetes, but some info is just hard to obtain or understand... any help with the pig thing?

I have to admit I'm a bit of a 'hippie' for lack of a better category, and shooting this **** into my skin day after day still makes me a bit ill. Kind of like I'm cheating fate and the 'natural' order of things by utilizing Western medicine to extend my stay here.

Since I have been diagnosed (about 2 1/2 years now, at age 26, same diagnosis age as my father who is alive), I've had a splenectomy, thyroidectomy, and a young son to join our family. The spleen 'spontaneously lacerated' (without ANY trauma) and the lumps in my neck were an obvious one. Now, with two kids and a whole lot of wondering, I'm a bit scared as to my supposed time left here.

I guess I've got some sort of autoimmune deficiency thing going on here. I'm not one to be lifted by shallow remarks trying to stay positive or whatever, but I would like to know if anyone else is in a similar situation physically?

How the hell do you deal daily with all this? Does it ever NOT go through you mind every hour of your days and nights?

OK... probably too long of a post for anyone to want to browse, but if you did, thank you and I look forward to your ideas!
You will get it off your mind in time,
I was diagnosed when I was 35 and blew it off , Not enough info, like now with intrernet.
I know people in their 70's that are doing great!

The whole Key is eating right and exercise.

I was on 60 unit Insulain 4000 glucophage and 30 actos and still had 300 blood sugars

Went on Atkins and lost 75 lbs and now I take nothing sugars run 110-135

Its not the end of the world , But don't ignore it like I did first 10 years.
I have several Problems B/C I was hard headed then.

 
Old 02-06-2004, 06:26 PM   #3
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: NY
Posts: 3,197
sharon1030 HB User
Smile Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

Hi,

I've had Type I since I was 12-21 years ago and I don't think I've ever thought of my time left on this earth. Maybe it's because I was a lot younger than you were when I was diagnosed. NOBODY knows how long he/she has left on this earth so that's probably more likely the reason why I don't sweat it. There's nothing you can do about it except for taking care of your health in the best possible way you can. As you said, your father was diagnosed at the same age you were and he's still alive. Somebody could be perfectly healthy and then go out one day and get hit by a car and die. I try not to worry about things that aren't under my control. I know it's easier said than done, but it helps me.

Sharon

 
Old 02-07-2004, 11:53 AM   #4
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Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,048
Mommyof4 HB User
Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

I understand what you are saying. Most people go through life thinking death and illness are something that happens to "other" people. Old people die, sick people die, but you are normal and that won't happen to you. Then one day the rules change. You are all of the sudden sick with this huge thing but you don't feel any different inside. It causes you to realize that one day you will die and it isn't just something that happens to other people. Now that you know it will happen to you, you have to focus on when it will happen. You want to be prepared. We as people, have a hard time with things beyond our scope of control.

I have studied the history of diabetes so I know what it was once like. The earliest known case of diabetes was in 1552 B.C. It was later described by Arateus as a "A melting down of flesh and limbs into urine"... People with diabetes literally wasted away in a matter of months. It truly was a death sentence. Knowing how far medicine has come helps me to realize that there is no better time in history to be living with this.

I focus not on how I will die but on how loved one's will look back on how I lived. Focusing on how you live takes too much work to worry about how you will die. I also know that the complications are not as big a concern as an extreme high or low in the meantime. I know that there may come a day, if I am not careful, that I don't wake up.

To a point, I feel lucky to have this. I wake up every day and realize that I can't do it on my own. It has increased my faith and my knowledge that life is fragile. I think of how many people are just wasting their days never knowing that death knocks at every door.

I have no problems injecting insulin because I know that the alternative is not something I would ever do to my family. I love them all too much to see me like that and to know that I could have prevented it. Ok, that's enough. I am getting wordy

P.S..... Since I gave the history lesson above, I just wanted to add another interesting fact. Diabetes is actually called Diabetes Mellitus. Mellitus is the Latin word for "honey". This is because in ancient times, the only way for a physician to know if a person had diabetes was to taste the urine. Glucosuria is "sweet urine"
__________________
Mindy (Type 1 Dx'd 11/94..Insulin Pump)

 
Old 02-07-2004, 05:40 PM   #5
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Join Date: May 2002
Location: NY
Posts: 3,197
sharon1030 HB User
Smile Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

Hi Mindy,

Thanks for that history lesson--it was very interesting. How would you have liked to be a doc back in those days? Yuck! I hope your son is doing okay.

Sharon

 
Old 02-07-2004, 08:15 PM   #6
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Join Date: May 2001
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 113
MikelBear HB User
Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

When I was diagnosed at age 12, in 1965, the doctors, by way of reassuring me, claimed that I'd have "20-25 good years ahead of me." I didn't find that very comforting at all--I added it up, and it looked like I'd never even make it to the age my parents were at the time--a young 37, with 4 small chldren. Didn't sound too good at all, and my entire existance took on a rather strange cast--I was a 12-year old with a rather existential viewpoint! Turns out that many kids diagnosed in the 60s were given similar prognisis--I assume it was fairly accurate at that time. I figured I should have actually died at the time of my diagnosis anyway (blood sugar of 1000, 3 days in a coma, with ketoacidosis, ruptured appendix, septic shock and severe dehydration and malnutrition.) That I came out of the coma and recovered completely was such a gift, that my "wasting away" reversed and I regained some weight, that I had energy, could last for more than an hour without going to the bathroom, that I could stay awake in my classes in school--hey, my life was such an improvement, I was grateful for anything! I decided to take the 20 years and get whatever I could out of life. I'm now almost 20 years more beyond that--diabetic for nearly 39 years, healthy, without complications, the father of 2 grown children, married 30 years to my high school sweetheart, a special education teacher for the past 28 years. I was lucky. I had good doctors, I had strict and caring parents, I have a devoted wife, great kids and fulfilling career. But I also took this difficult disease very seriously, worked very hard to keep my control as perfect as I could, and exercised an iron will and self-discipline that has never gotten easier. It's been worth the 39 years of sacrifice--I recognize that someday diabetes may kill me, but I'm not going down without a fight. I intend to finish off my teaching career with 36 years in the clasroom, walk out at age 60--only 8 more years--with my pension, and enjoy my retirement someplace sunny and warm, hopefully with some grandchildren, and hopefully with some semblance of energy and well-being. If you'd told me that 35 years ago, I woulkd have doubted it. Now, it's almost within reach, and I deserve it! I may not live as long as others, but, since I exercise more, weigh less, eat better and take overall better care of myself than most people, who knows...?

Living well IS the best revenge...
Michael

 
Old 02-09-2004, 07:13 PM   #7
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Heidimw HB User
Re: Lifespan of us lucky folk????

I was just diagnosed with type 1, and have spent the last two weeks doing nothing but researching and reading. I have a sister with juvenile diabetes, which she got when she was 16 (and now is almost 40), and she has no complications. It isn't the diabetes that kills people. It is uncontrolled blood sugar. If you keep a tight reign on that, you are, in essence, no different from a nondiabetic (and probably healthier), and no more likely to die earlier. It is the sustained high sugars that damage your body, and that is something you can control, to a great extent.

I understand your fear, though. I have three children myself, and I never thought about not being there for their marriages and children until now. I am greatly independent, and while I don't mind taking the insulin, I cringe at being so utterly dependent on it. I have this insane panic that I could get caught somewhere, stranded or something, and not survive because I don't have this drug. Besides which, it has crushed my hopes of ever being on Survivor.

There is a book out there called The Diabetes Solution, by Dr. Bernstein. It is fascinating, although radical. He is type 1, diagnosed in the 1940s and now in his 70s, with no complications and extremely healthy. He has testimonials in the book and on his website which may give you some positive and realistic feedback. The site is : [URL=http://]http://www.diabetes-normalsugars.com/testimonials/testimonials.shtml[/URL]

Sometimes I think it really sucks, but then I remember that my symptoms also fit several other diseases, including brain tumors and terminal illnesses, and I feel pretty lucky. Really.

Last edited by Heidimw; 02-09-2004 at 07:15 PM.

 
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