It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Diet & Nutrition Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-23-2004, 09:44 PM   #1
Inactive
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: CA
Posts: 349
JacquelineL HB User
Growth hormones in beef

Does anyone know how eating beef containing growth hormones affects the body? My husband claims that his body gets agitated after eating beef and he can't sleep at night because his skin feels like it is crawling. He is about to give up beef and I would like to know if it is really the beef affecting him or maybe it is something else. He has already switched from milk with growth hormones to one that claims that it has no rBST.

 
Old 09-24-2004, 05:45 AM   #2
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,434
Gopherhead HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineL
Does anyone know how eating beef containing growth hormones affects the body? My husband claims that his body gets agitated after eating beef and he can't sleep at night because his skin feels like it is crawling. He is about to give up beef and I would like to know if it is really the beef affecting him or maybe it is something else. He has already switched from milk with growth hormones to one that claims that it has no rBST.
I suspect that it is something else in the beef. Specifically arachidonic acid (AA) which is a fatty acid that is derived almost entirely from animal sources (meat, dairy products, etc.) It is converted to inflammatory prostaglandins and leukotrienes that contribute significantly to inflammation. Red meat and egg yolks are typical foods that set people off. Often people who are sensitive to this have elevated blood pressure and/or cholesterol, retain abnormally high amounts of fluid, and/or suffer from inflammatory conditions such as skin rashes, asthma, allergies, bursitis, or arthritis.

To help rectify the problem you should avoid foods high in AA and donsume coldwater fish such as mackerel, herring, sardines and salmon. These fish are rich sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) which competes with arachidonic acid for prostaglandin and leukotriene production. The net effect of consumption of these fish is a significantly reduced inflammatory/allergic response. You can also eat foods that are high in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which can be converted into EPA - flaxseed oil, walnuts, hemp oil, flax seeds and green leafy veggies.

Ultimately what you're trying to do is restore the balance between Omega 6 EFAs and Omega 3 EFAs. Most of us have way too much Omega 6 EFAs and no where near enough Omega 3 (it is estimated our ratio is anywhere from 20 : 1 to 30 : 1 and it should be 4 : 1 ) Omega 6 contributes to anti inflamatory diseases, Omega 3 counter acts them.

Cheers,
Nat
__________________
A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.

Last edited by Gopherhead; 09-24-2004 at 05:46 AM.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 09-27-2004, 10:48 AM   #3
Inactive
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: CA
Posts: 349
JacquelineL HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

You may have something there. I just found Vintage Natural Beef at a health food store and am going to try it. It has never been exposed to any additives, either hormones or antibiotics. A bit more expensive, but considering it is choice beef, maybe not much.

 
Old 09-27-2004, 10:58 AM   #4
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,434
Gopherhead HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineL
You may have something there. I just found Vintage Natural Beef at a health food store and am going to try it. It has never been exposed to any additives, either hormones or antibiotics. A bit more expensive, but considering it is choice beef, maybe not much.
Beef by it's very nature contains arachidonic acid unless it is fed grain that is high in Omega 3 (I'm not sure about that; it could all be high in AA) If this is the problem then it won't matter how expensive the beef is, it's not an additive that is the problem.

Nat
__________________
A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.

 
Old 09-27-2004, 01:56 PM   #5
Inactive
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: CA
Posts: 349
JacquelineL HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

I appreciate the information. I'm going to test this beef since my husband seems to think it is the additives causing the problem. If he gets the same reaction then we know it is the beef itself. He doesn't have any of the health problems you listed except for occasional allergies. He is gluten intolerant.

 
Old 09-28-2004, 05:13 AM   #6
Inactive
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Jersey City, NJ
Posts: 2,903
zip2play HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

You also couldn't COMPREHEND the amount of antibiotics pumped into cattle to keep them from dropping dead by the millions after weing cramped together. Any disease would devastate the herd.

 
Old 09-28-2004, 09:37 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 249
llamamuffinmama HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

not to mention that you get cholesterol itself (which you only ingest through animal foods) whether or not the animal has been given growth hormones. cholesterol is basically a steroid hormone.

 
Old 09-28-2004, 10:28 AM   #8
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,434
Gopherhead HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by llamamuffinmama
not to mention that you get cholesterol itself (which you only ingest through animal foods) whether or not the animal has been given growth hormones. cholesterol is basically a steroid hormone.
Cholesterol is what is called a sterol molecule, which is any of a group of solid, mostly unsaturated polycyclic alcohol molecules. There is one hydroxyl (OH) group on carbon 3 that makes cholesterol an alcohol. Cholesterol is abundant in a wide variety of animal tissues, including human tissue. It is so abundant because it is necesary for life. Your body will manufacture all the cholesterol it requires, regardless of your diet; dietary cholesterol has minimal impact on endogenous cholesterol levels. In fact, endogenous cholesterol is more suseptible to oxidization than the dietary type; what this means is the cholesterol which your body creates has a greater likelihood of becoming damaged.

Cholesterol is especially abundant in brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous tissues. It has more recently been discovered that cholesterol molecules are essential for nerve cells to communicate with each other.

Cholesterol is also the primary molecule from which all of the corticosteroid hormones of the adrenal glands are derived. Without these adrenal corticosteroid hormones, we would live in pain.

Cholesterol is the essential basic substance from which our bodies manufacture both male and female sex hormones, i.e., testosterone and the various estrogen- and progesterone-related hormones.

In our skin, in the presence of sunshine, cholesterol is converted to vitamin D.

Cholesterol isn't evil.
__________________
A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.

 
Old 09-29-2004, 05:51 AM   #9
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 2,383
auntjudyg HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gopherhead
Cholesterol isn't evil.
. . . and the connection between dietary cholesterol and one's blood lipid levels is far from concretely established.

(and thanks for the cholesterol primer!)

 
Old 09-29-2004, 09:40 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 249
llamamuffinmama HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

I never said cholesterol was "evil", and I'm not claiming to be an expert, but I have read up on the Framingham Heart Study and it does suggest a strong correlation among dietary cholesterol intake, our cholesterol levels, and incidence of heart disease.

According to that data:
The average total cholesterol level for men in the United States is 211 points.
For women, 213 points. The average level of a U.S. heart attack victim is 225 points. Below 150 points total cholesterol, risk of coronary artery disease becomes “almost nonexistent”. The average total cholesterol of a strict vegetarian (vegan) is 127 points.

Also, in 1990, Dr. Dean Ornish published the results of a new study, the first trial ever in which anyone was able to reverese coronary heart disease through dietary change. How he did it: switching patients to a low fat vegan diet. According to Mr. Ornish, eighty-two percent of patients who followed the diet showed some measurable reversal of their coronary artery blockages.

So I'd say there is clearly some connection. Of course there are other factors in our blood cholesterol levels, I'm not denying that.

 
Old 09-29-2004, 10:06 AM   #11
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,434
Gopherhead HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by llamamuffinmama
I never said cholesterol was "evil", and I'm not claiming to be an expert, but I have read up on the Framingham Heart Study and it does suggest a strong correlation among dietary cholesterol intake, our cholesterol levels, and incidence of heart disease.

According to that data:
The average total cholesterol level for men in the United States is 211 points.
For women, 213 points. The average level of a U.S. heart attack victim is 225 points. Below 150 points total cholesterol, risk of coronary artery disease becomes “almost nonexistent”. The average total cholesterol of a strict vegetarian (vegan) is 127 points..
The results of the farmingham study (which began in 1948 and still ongoing) found no connection between dietary cholesterol levels and high cholesterol levels. They thought they knew exactly why some people had more cholesterol than others - they ate more in their diet. To prove the link, they measured cholesterol intake and compared it with blood cholesterol. Although subjects consumed cholesterol over a wide range, there was little or no difference in the levels of cholesterol in their blood and, thus, no relationship between the amount of cholesterol eaten and levels of blood cholesterol was found. (Although it is interesting that women who had the highest levels of cholesterol in their blood were ones who had eaten the least cholesterol.) Next, the scientists studied intakes of saturated fats but again they could find no relation. There was still no relation when they studied total calorie intake. They then considered the possibility that something was masking the effects of diet, but no other factor made the slightest difference. Twenty-two years later they concluded: "There is, in short, no suggestion of any relation between diet and the subsequent development of CHD in the study group."

On Christmas Eve, 1997, twenty-seven years later, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) carried a follow-up report that showed that dietary saturated fat reduced strokes. As these tend to affect older men than CHD, they wondered if a fatty diet was causing those in the trial to die of CHD before they had a stroke. But the researchers discount this, saying:

"This hypothesis, however, depends on the presence of a strong direct association of fat intake with coronary heart disease. Since we found no such association, competing mortality from coronary heart disease is very unlikely to explain our results."

In other words, after forty-nine years of research, they are still saying that they can find no relation between a fatty diet and heart disease.

There have been many more such studies since then, who's aim was to prove the connection but ended up proving just the opposite (the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial, The Tecumseh Study, the WHO European Coronary Prevention Study, The North Karelia Project)

Another analysis based on a number of American studies estimated that on a lifelong programme of cholesterol reduction by diet, the gain in life expectancy for those at very high risk would be between eighteen days and twelve months, and for those at low risk between three days and three months.

FYI, if your cholesterol is too low (below 160mg/dl) you have an increased risk of mood disorders, depression, stroke, suicide and violence.
__________________
A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.

 
Old 09-29-2004, 10:41 AM   #12
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 2,383
auntjudyg HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

The Framingham Heart Study is an interesting one to examine . . . to see what the study actually demonstrated versus what has since been written about it. It is a rather startling example of how "science" is turned into "policy". But we have covered that ground so many times here . . . as well as discussions about exactly what types of fat were studied/grouped together and what conclusions might be if things were done differently . . . and how, yes, Dr. Ornishes approach has produced positive results for many people but that not much research has been done on other approaches that might produce better results . . . or how studies in general are looking at "average" results with no consideration of individual difference . . . etc., etc., etc.

 
Old 09-29-2004, 12:38 PM   #13
Inactive
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: CA
Posts: 349
JacquelineL HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Getting back to the beef experiment---after eating the natural beef for two days, there has been no bad reaction to it as there was to other beef. But WOW. I must say--this is the best steak I have had in years!! It is tender, juicy and very tasty. We ate at a renown steakhouse last week and their steak was not as good as this was. That is enough to keep me buying it--too bad I have to drive 40 miles to get it.

 
Old 09-29-2004, 01:34 PM   #14
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Posts: 2,383
auntjudyg HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineL
--too bad I have to drive 40 miles to get it.
Hopefully demand will pick up and it will become more widely available!

 
Old 09-29-2004, 07:29 PM   #15
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Russellville, AR, USA
Posts: 549
arkie6 HB User
Re: Growth hormones in beef

Quote:
Originally Posted by llamamuffinmama
....Also, in 1990, Dr. Dean Ornish published the results of a new study, the first trial ever in which anyone was able to reverese coronary heart disease through dietary change...
That is not exactly true. His small intervention study involved much more than just dietary changes - it also included an exercise program, smoking cessation, and stress management - any of which alone or in combination could have resulted in the positive results he reported.
__________________
The tragedy of science is the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact. T H Huxley

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Growth hormone in chicken windchase1 General Health 1 05-06-2007 04:47 AM
Protein shakes and hair loss/growth kittywitty Hair Loss / Alopecia 3 05-03-2007 09:09 AM
Weightlifting stunting growth coritani Exercise & Fitness 3 04-09-2007 05:42 AM
Horribly embarrassing problem: excessive hair growth... EVERYWHERE! Please help me! Melissa765 Women's Health 19 03-31-2007 10:55 AM
Stunted Genital Growth SomePerson12 Sexual Health - Men 4 03-26-2007 09:07 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



JohnR41 (17), sjb (8), janewhite1 (7), tjlhb (5), Machaon (4), bdrunner79 (4), Administrator (4), ladybud (3), Anjjou72 (2), Kali333 (2)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1165), MSJayhawk (1000), Apollo123 (898), Titchou (833), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (758), ladybud (747), sammy64 (668), midwest1 (665), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:49 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.com™ All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!