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Old 02-24-2005, 11:08 AM   #1
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Food pyramid question?

Why is pasta and white rice in the same category as sweets? Why should pasta be eaten sparingly?

Just wondering. because I have eaten pasta/and or white rice almost everyday of my life and never really seemed to have a problem with it.

Thanks

 
Old 02-24-2005, 11:40 AM   #2
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Re: Food pyramid question?

Where are you getting the information that it is in the same group as sweets? My understanding was that they were in the grain group, even on the new plan.

That said, I agree they ought to be eaten sparingly. They really have very little nutritional value except what is added after processing; in which case why not save the calories and take a vitamin?

 
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Old 02-24-2005, 12:26 PM   #3
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Re: Food pyramid question?

he's proly confused with the cakes and, muffins being in the same group as the pastas and, risotto..LOL ..

 
Old 02-24-2005, 02:31 PM   #4
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Re: Food pyramid question?

auntjudyg,
I am referring to the "rebuilt" food pyramid. You can see a picture of it here:
http://faculty.washington.edu/kepeter/118/exams/food-pyramid.htm

Quote:
They really have very little nutritional value except what is added after processing; in which case why not save the calories and take a vitamin?
I, and few people that I know, ever eat pasta without pasta sauce and/or vegetables mixed in. In most cases, pasta sauce also contains vegetables (onions, garlic, etc ..), olive oil, and tomato which are sources of vitamins and other nutrients. My problem with arguments like the one you posed is that it ignores the fact that the body needs good sources of energy. Vitamins are necessary, but glucose, not inorganic vitamins, is what our bodies run on. Also, pasta tends to take a long time to digest (especially with pasta sauce, carrots, peas, beans, onions, etc.. mixed in) and thus does not cause the sharp spikes in blood sugar associated with eating white bread or simple sweats (though you might want that kind of spike before or after excercising).

Short of dieting only on cereal (which I think has way too much iron nowadays) or whole wheat bread, pasta seems to be the best source of carbohydrates around.

And Losec20mg,
I am not confused, I just think those recommendations are completely silly and probably not based on solid science. It reminds me of the egg frenzy that led so many people to stop eating eggs. Interesting thing about it, is that many of them never saw their LDL cholesterol levels drop.

 
Old 02-25-2005, 06:39 AM   #5
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Re: Food pyramid question?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dand5
auntjudyg,
I am referring to the "rebuilt" food pyramid. You can see a picture of it here:
http://faculty.washington.edu/kepeter/118/exams/food-pyramid.htm
dand5, I don't have access to the original article, but this looks like the authors' idea of how the pyramid ought to be "re-built". From the guidelines I heard a couple of weeks ago (I can't find them on the USDA site at the moment), this is NOT what is being recommended.

The big change concerning grain products was that the "new" pyramid recommends that half of the servings (or something like that . . . at least 3 servings, I believe) be whole grain products. Of course, proponents of the "old" pyramid were always saying that that was what the USDA meant, so I don't quite get it. So, as far as the USDA is concerned, your pasta is fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dand5
My problem with arguments like the one you posed is that it ignores the fact that the body needs good sources of energy.
I don't follow how you conclude that I am saying that body does not need good sources of energy. I am saying the body doesn't need something that contributes absolutely no nutritional value. There are plenty of ways to get nutritional value and energy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dand5
Also, pasta tends to take a long time to digest (especially with pasta sauce, carrots, peas, beans, onions, etc.. mixed in) and thus does not cause the sharp spikes in blood sugar associated with eating white bread or simple sweats (though you might want that kind of spike before or after excercising).
You're talking about white flour pasta here? I couldn't disagree more. Some people do fine with it . . . if so, go for it . . . other's don't. But I don't agree about it digesting slowly . . . though yes, digestion would be slowed when eaten with veggies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dand5
Short of dieting only on cereal (which I think has way too much iron nowadays) or whole wheat bread, pasta seems to be the best source of carbohydrates around.
Cereal? That's just as over processed as the pasta! How about whole grains crackers (like rye), brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, various nuts and seeds, dried legumes/lentils, root veggies, winter squash?

Well . . . we all have our different ideas about what is best.

 
Old 02-25-2005, 12:03 PM   #6
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Re: Food pyramid question?

Quote:
I don't follow how you conclude that I am saying that body does not need good sources of energy. I am saying the body doesn't need something that contributes absolutely no nutritional value. There are plenty of ways to get nutritional value and energy.
I apologize for misinterpreting your statements then. Brown rice is definately a great energy source!

Quote:
You're talking about white flour pasta here? I couldn't disagree more. Some people do fine with it . . . if so, go for it . . . other's don't. But I don't agree about it digesting slowly . . . though yes, digestion would be slowed when eaten with veggies.
I am not really sure if it is white flour pasta. Is that the most commonly consumed type of pasta? My pasta labels seem to advertise durum as an ingredient, not really sure what that is. I was always told that the polysaccharides in pasta took a relatively long amount of time to digest (not as long as vegetables or whole grains but still considerably longer than white bread).

What do you think of whole wheat bread?

In general, I agree with your ideas, but there are times when a quick increase in blood sugar may be needed, such as during excercise. Actually, that is probably the only time.

In any case, thanks for your response.

 
Old 02-25-2005, 12:53 PM   #7
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Re: Food pyramid question?

Pasta is made from semolina flour, which is made from durum wheat. Durum wheat is the hardest of the wheat family. It is not considered whole wheat; however, it is not bleached either like the all-purpose bleached white flour a lot of people buy to make cookies. That's why semolina flour is yellow. It is also very corse and sandy feeling.

The newly revised official food pyramid from the USDA has not been released yet. You can type in "new food pyramid" in a search engine and look for the USDA or FDA website. There should be a "gov" extension on the URL. They are planning to add exercise to it and telling people to choose whole grains over processed grains. They are also toying with the idea that the food pyramid is not a clear way of explaining nutrition. The USDA's homepage has a lot of different kinds of food pyramids you might be interested in looking at. They have an Asian Food Pyramid, a Mediterranian Food Pyramid, etc. Just type "food pyramid" into the USDA's search engine.
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Old 02-26-2005, 07:24 AM   #8
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Lenin HB UserLenin HB UserLenin HB UserLenin HB UserLenin HB UserLenin HB User
Re: Food pyramid question?

That's some WEIRD food pyramid and I don't think it's popular outside the author's own circle of friends.
Maybe I'll make my own and put a layer of OREOS supporting the whole thing...

Remember, just because it LOOKS like a pyramid doesn't mean it makes any sense nutritionally. Is anything sillier than having the base of the period half supported by OIL??? Did the guy work for WESSON?

Here's a pyramid that has some nutritional validity from the U.S. Government:
[url]http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/food-pyramid/main.htm[/url]
One might disagree with this or that point but at least it's not preposterous.

Last edited by Lenin; 02-26-2005 at 07:35 AM.

 
Old 02-27-2005, 03:18 PM   #9
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Re: Food pyramid question?

Hi dand5! I see what your sawing. We all make compromises because of taste preferences, habit, budget, etc. I just didn't quite get the case for pasta being "best". Anyway, yes, most regular pasta would be considered refined and processed.

Quinoa is quite easy and quick to cook, similar sort of taste, though it is definitely more expensive.

But if you are getting in the veggies and fruits, personally, I think those are most important. On MY food pyramid, I would put veggies at the base of the pyramid with 6 to 11 servings instead of grain products.

Whole wheat bread? Well, first I must say that I have found it VERY beneficial to cut wheat out of my diet as much as possible . . . so that definitely colors my opinion. I think many people would do better by at least cutting back on it. Everyone pushes variety in one's diet, but for some reason most "experts" see nothing wrong with wheat at least 2 or 3 times a day. If someone recommended that for broccoli, everyone would think it was wierd, but there is NO arguing that broccoli is good for you!

 
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