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Old 11-29-2006, 11:11 AM   #1
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metabolic typing

hi there

i went to a professional for metabolic typing and he told me that i am gluten intolerant as well as lactose intolerant (well,he said that i cannot ever eat any dairy product again, so i assume he meant lactose intolerance). I am also not allowed to eat meat (only fish).

However, the diet he told me i should stick to is pretty extreme, but i can stick to it.Basically only fruits and veggies and fish.

anywayyyy,my actual question is, i adore plain fat free yoghurt so much as well as cappucino's.....do you think it would be okay to eat/drink that once in a while even though he told me not to touch dairy?

also....for those of you who know something about metabolic typing...what do you think about it?

 
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Old 11-29-2006, 12:46 PM   #2
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Re: metabolic typing

Sounds like Quackery to me.

It is possible to be lactose or gluten untolerant but beware of flip diagnoses.
There are even some online sutes where you type insome info and enclose your credit card number and thy'll analyze you metabolically.

As Monty Python said: RUN AWAY!

 
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Old 12-01-2006, 11:55 AM   #3
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Re: metabolic typing

Well, I don't know too much about what metabolic typing is? Though, gluten intolerance is a lot more common than some people think. The estimate in the US is that 1 out of every 133 people have a gluten intolerance, or a more severe form called Celiac Disease. Several people that have a gluten intolerance aren't diagnosed with it.

 
Old 12-01-2006, 10:53 PM   #4
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Re: metabolic typing

thanks for your replies

Lenin: So do you suggest i just sort of ignore what the doctor said?
I totally know what you mean, but i have family that went to him and said that he is brilliant.So...i dont know, because i believe "everything in moderation", but now, i have to eliminate quite a few things that i used to eat. I dont think i am going to quit with my milk and yoghurt though ..........i'm so confused, cos i tend to over analyze everything!

Concerned Male: Do you by any chance have gluten intolerance? Do you know anyone who had it, because i would like to compare how somebody with gluten intolerance feels after eating gluten....


ANYONE who is reading this and who knows about gluten or lactose intolerance, how does it affect you if you ingest it?

 
Old 12-02-2006, 12:55 AM   #5
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Re: metabolic typing

Ankh,

I have gluten intolerance. I think what Lenin is saying is that people are not gluten intolerant just because they have a certain metabolic type (it sounds like quackery to me, too). Yes, there are a fair amount of people who would feel a lot better if they eliminated gluten from their diets (as Concerned Male says, current estimates are 1 out of 133), but Lenin is right to be wary of a "doctor" who just declares that you are gluten intolerant without doing any (legitimate) blood tests and without doing a biopsy to see if there is any damage to your intestines from celiac disease.

If you wish to eliminate gluten from your diet, it will probably make you feel better even if you are NOT gluten intolerant, just because most of the junk food out there is full of gluten -- and we'd ALL feel better without all that junk food!

To answer your question regarding how I feel with and without gluten in my diet:

When I used to eat wheat, I felt hungry all the time. When i moved to Germany, where the wheat has an even higher gluten content than in the US, I started getting acid indigestion. The indigestion got worse and worse until I was in so much pain that I couldn't sleep at night. I looked at my diet, and finally came to the conclusion that the symptoms were definitely worse when I ate a meal with wheat in it. I researched and found out about celiac disease. I started learning how to eliminate gluten from my diet and how to cook from scratch and how to find other forms of starch in my diet that had nothing to do with wheat, rye, barley or oats.

My symptoms improved over the next several months, and I finally found a doctor who was willing to test me for celiac disease (this means blood tests for specific antobodies and an intestinal biopsy -- NOT some magic hand-waving and declaring that I fit into some pre-determined "metabolic group" whatever that means). By that time I had not eaten wheat for 6 months or so, and the tests came back negative for celiac (the body clears itself of the antobodies after a few months so that they no longer appear in blood tests, and the damaged cilia in the intestines can heal if you are no longer giving them wheat to react to so that the biopsy will not show positive after a few months).

So I was left to decide for myself. Yes I feel much better without wheat. I am no longer constantly hungry. I have more energy and am no longer sleepy all the time. When I do eat small quantities of wheat I have acid indigestion. When I eat large amounts of wheat (I once ate one serving of a quiche with a wheat crust) I get acid indigestion AND I feel out-of-sorts and hungry and just plain WRONG for a month afterwards AND I react to all foods with acid indigestion until my body finally calms down again.

The point here is not what MY symptoms are. This is because different people have different symptoms -- the body is reacting to gluten by attacking itself and the exact places where the body is attacking create different symptoms. The point is whether YOU would feel better without wheat in your diet, and, really, the only way to know is to try it.

This means reading up on celiac disease so that you know how to read labels and determine if something has wheat in it or not. As an example, you read the great big letters on the front of the bottle that says "Soy Sauce". This has soy in it, so it must be ok for people with gluten intolerance, yes? However, when you turn the bottle over, you read in little tiny print that the ingredients are soy AND WHEAT. So, gluten intolerant people learn to avoid soy sauce and use tamari sauce instead -- and read the little tiny print in the ingredients list AND listen to their own bodies to tell them if something doesn't agree with them.

I suggest that doing an experiment for a few weeks will tell you whether you feel better without wheat in your diet -- but you have to read up on celiac disease because they have lots of information on how wheat is hidden in most of the processed products out there. Just eliminating bread and pasta from your diet is not the same as eliminating gluten.

I'll be glad to post more info based on your specific questions. Please feel free to ask -- I'm sure there are others on these Boards who have good information also.

--Rheanna

Last edited by rheanna; 12-02-2006 at 12:58 AM.

 
Old 12-02-2006, 06:54 AM   #6
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Re: metabolic typing

Ankh,

Let me speak to lactose intolerance (others have covered celiac/gluten.)
If you have LACTOSE INTOLERANCE you KNOW IT.
I suffered from it for almost 20 years and then slowly acclimated myself to some degree of tolerance.
After drinking a 10 ounce glass of cold milk, those who are LI will get cramps sometimes in MINUTES, sometimes in a half hour. IT will soon be followed by an urgent diarrhea. Nobody with the condition needs be told by a "metabolic doctor" that he is intolerant usually the other way round, you tell your DOCTOR you can't tolerate milk.
People with LI can usually eat cheese and yoghurts and kefir where most of the lactose is fermented to lactic acid although I have an aunt who can be doubled over with pain for even cheese...a glass of milk would probably require an AMBULANCE

My point is that you don't need a doctor to diagnose food intolerance; if it is real you KNOW IT.
(God, if I ever developed celiac disease I'd DIE...life without pasta is meaningless. )

This echoes a couple decades back when these same quacks were diagnosing EVERYONE with candida based on a questionairre. A friend spent 10 years avoiding vinegar, soy sauce, tofu, anything fermented, anything baked with yeast, mushrooms, all Chinese, Japanese and Thai food... then she finally decided she might have gone off the deep end and reintroduced all these foods and she is just FINE (and loves mushrooms with a passsion.)
All that time she operated on a misguided premise and deprived herself of excellent foods because of some silly "new age nutritionist." (I think that's the moniker this "practioner" called herself... maybe "holistic" was tossed in too.)

Last edited by Lenin; 12-02-2006 at 06:55 AM.

 
Old 12-03-2006, 12:01 AM   #7
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Re: metabolic typing

These are some extremely good messages by members that have taken their time and have shared their experiences!
You all have probably touched more people's lives than just the person that started this thread!

God Bless---Harry

 
Old 12-05-2006, 01:11 PM   #8
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Re: metabolic typing

hi there again

yes, thank you so much for your knowledge!
Always good to know that there are reliable people who respond to someone in need of extra guidance

I shall do more research as well.

......i might have more questions though.....

 
Old 12-06-2006, 03:40 PM   #9
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Re: metabolic typing

Your body needs enzyme lactase to break up the lactose, your lacking. But it is probably the casine protein in dairy that is the problem. Nonfat plain yogurt has low lactose and low casine, I wouldn't worry about it.

I think I have gluten intolerances, I just feel tired after eating bread or rice. I don't know why that is, I assume it interferes with digestion. Manganese helps me with that.

Last edited by Saverain; 12-06-2006 at 03:41 PM.

 
Old 12-06-2006, 08:30 PM   #10
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Re: metabolic typing

question:

Rheanna, what does a daily meal plan look like to you?
What do you eat?


Lenin, so you say that if you have LI, you can still have yoghurt? Is it then only milk than you avoid?hmm....

 
Old 12-07-2006, 08:19 AM   #11
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Re: metabolic typing

Ankh,

This isn't really supposed to be a recipe forum, so I'll leave out the quantities, but I'll include the ingredients so you can see that I make up my own foods rather than buy them already prepared. Already-prepared foods often have ingredients in them that give me problems.

For breakfast every morning:
-- cornflakes (nothing added, like malt which comes from barley and is in most commercial brands of cornflakes), powdered milk and whole milk, ground flax seed and almonds (self-ground), banana

Today's lunch:
-- canned tuna (the water is drained and given to the cat), mayonaisse (homemade with cold-pressed canola oil), quark (sort of like yoghurt, but thicker), ground flax seed, toasted pine nuts, toasted sesame seeds, chopped celery and apple, rice crackers

Tonight's dinner (risotto):
-- risotto rice, marsala wine, veggie broth (read label to make sure there's no problem ingredients), chopped onions and lots of chopped mushrooms, toasted sesame seeds, grated parmesan cheese (self-grated to make sure there's nothing else mixed in), and some steamed veggie (haven't decided yet)

As you can see, I have lots of milk products in my diet, but if I found that I couldn't eat milk products, then I would go in other directions for thinking up meals.

The starch portion of my meals is usually corn-based (cornflakes, cornmeal, corn on the cob) or rice-based (I have various sorts of rice, like basmati, risotto, sushi for different purposes, rice crackers), or buckwheat or quinoa to cook up and put a veggie stir-fry over. I also love beans and lentils.

I have learned to make my own pizza dough from buckwheat flour (I go for the whole-grain flavor so it's more buckwheat and less rice flour). The pre-packaged pizza base here in Germany is ghastly, so I HAVE to make my own! Put a little tomato paste on top, a few italian herbs, some turkey-based salami that I trust to be flour-free, some veggies, and some grated mozzarella that has no flour added, and it's almost like eating the real thing! I preheat a pizza-stone in the oven to bake it on at a high temperature -- this improves the flavor a lot.

And Lenin -- I DO have gluten-free pasta for spaghetti sauce -- by the time I put the strongly-seasoned sauces on the pasta I can't taste that it isn't wheat, and my guests can't tell either.

I often use a small quantity of chopped turkey meat or lamb and lots of veggies to make some sort of seasoned stir-fry over rice for dinner, with a steamed veggie on the side.

The main thing here is that I put together my own meals from separate ingredients, because I like to cook and I like knowing that the ingredients are pronounceable (no msg or flavor enhancers or mystery starches or whatever).

Can give you lots more ideas in another post -- this one is getting a bit long. Will come up with some ideas for meals that don't include milk products.

--Rheanna

 
Old 12-07-2006, 01:57 PM   #12
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Re: metabolic typing

Rheanna,
Since gluten intolerances and celiac disease are more common than once believed, why does it seem that so many doctors don't know much about it, and the proper tests to be used to diagnose it? How accurate would you say are the proper tests that are used in diagnosing gluten intolerance and celiac disease?

I've been wondering myself if I might have a gluten intolerance. In 2001, I started having an excess of flatulence/gas. Since then, the flatulence problem has gotten worse, where I have it practically throughout the whole day and night, it seems. The over the counter gas remedies have not helped with the problem. Also, when I go out to eat at a restaurant or a buffet type of place, I usually get diarrhea after I'm done eating. I do tend to eat more when I go out, then I would at home, but I still find it odd that I would get diarrhea almost everytime I go out to eat.

Also, in 2003, I started feeling exhausted all the time, and my short term memory got bad. I still have the exhaustion/fatigue and short term memory problems, and doctors can't seem to figure out why. I thought that I could possibly be sensitive to gluten. Though, in my case, the symptoms I have are always there, not just after eating foods that have gluten in them. Do you think it might be worth it for me to find a doctor that tests for gluten intolerance? Thanks.

 
Old 12-10-2006, 01:43 AM   #13
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Re: metabolic typing

Concerned Male,

Doctors are trained to match a pre-defined list of symptoms to a pre-defined list of diseases/syndromes, and prescribe a pre-defined list of procedures/medicines/operations to them. Most doctors are sincere in trying to find a definition for your list of symptoms so that they can make you better. But they are not scientists, who are trained to make experiments and look for the root causes of things. So over time, scientists have looked at the mysterious symptoms that later were defined as diabetes for example, and have come up with solutions for these people. Doctors now have a list of symptoms to look for, and a list of tests to do, and a list of prescriptions and dietary advice to give people who come into the office with specific complaints that can be identified as diabetes.

Unfortunately, gluten intolerance only manifests as specific symptoms when a baby has a severe case of it. A baby will have diahrrea and stomach bloating and will fail to grow properly, because their body is reacting to the gluten in a very dramatic way. A doctor who is aware of the symptoms can fairly easily see that he should order tests for celiac disease. So he takes blood samples and he tests for specific antibodies, and he looks at the child's small intestine and looks for visible damage to the cilia. It is pretty straight forward to diagnose such a severe case.

But when the person has only a mild (at first) reaction to gluten, the symptoms to present to the doctor are not so clear-cut. A person may or may not have diahrrea or acid indigestion or pains or various other reactions. They will probably have damage to their small intestines, but not so dramatic as with the baby. The damage to the cilia in the intestines is in different places in different people. This results in impaired nutrition, increased tendency to other auto-immune diseases, increased tendency to gastrointestinal cancer. But the list of symptoms is too vague for most doctors to work with. We have to wait until scientists have studied it enough for this condition to be easily defined for doctors.

In the meantime, IF you are gluten intolerant and continue to eat wheat, then your blood will show the antibodies that your body is making in its reaction to gluten. If you self-diagnose and stop eating gluten right now, then your body will gradually clear itself of these antibodies and therefore nothing will show up on a blood test. This is what happened to me, as it took me 6 months to find a doctor who would take me seriously and give me the blood test and look at my intestines. But I was absolutely sure that I was reacting to gluten, so I eliminated it from my diet. So officially I am not gluten intolerant, because doctors haven't diagnosed it.

There are two reasons why you may not be seeing a difference in your reactions to meals with and without wheat. One reason is, that your body may be so sensitive and reactive that it's now reacting to everything -- it's having a great deal of difficulty doing its basic digestion job because of the constant "insult" of frequent gluten. The other reason might be that you are unaware of the minor (to most people) amounts of wheat that are in most prepared foods and in most restaurant meals (there's flour in practically everything!). So you may be getting gluten even when it doesn't look obvious like pasta or pizza or bread rolls.

If you wish to have a proper medical diagnosis, then start looking for a cooperative doctor now, before you have cleared the antibodies from your blood and repaired the damaged cilia in your intestines. At the moment all he can do is say, "yep, that's what you've got -- now here's a list of foods to avoid". There is no cure and there is no medicine that will make your body stop reacting to gluten. That is for the scientists of the future. But at least you'll know for sure.

If you wish to see for yourself, then read up on all you can about where gluten is hidden in foods, and what disguised names there are for wheat (spelt, cous-cous, seitan, tabbouleh, matzo, to name a few). You can eat a well-balanced diet without wheat, rye and barley. By doing this for a few months, you may see a difference in your symptoms. It took me about 6 months before my symptoms went away, but my body started noticing the difference after only a few weeks.

It's worth a try. And good luck in trying to track down what's ailing you.

 
Old 12-10-2006, 10:47 PM   #14
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Re: metabolic typing

so are you born with gluten intolerance, or does it manifest itself as you grow older....

i wonder what triggers this intolerance if you are not born with it....

 
Old 12-11-2006, 07:32 AM   #15
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Re: metabolic typing

Ankh,

My guess is that we are born with genetic predispositions to certain diseases, but they only show themselves when the body for some reason is overwhelmed and cannot cope anymore.

For example, the various American Indian populations ate simple local foods and lived healthy lives for hundreds of years. When people were forced onto reservations and started eating white flour and other refined foods that they were not used to, more and more of them started having diabetes and other diseases. Their bodies are not genetically designed to cope with diets high in white flour and other unhealthy things. Other people who may have the genetic predisposition to diabetes don't come down with it because their bodies haven't reached the stress-point.

There's a lot of speculation right now about what causes chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. One idea is that with all the chemicals in our foods and in our environment (solvents and perfumes and automobile exhaust and bazillions of other chemicals), some people's bodies cope for a long time with all this onslaught of chemicals, and then one day, perhaps after a flu or something, their bodies just cannot cope any more.

I think that something similar is happening with people who live with wheat all their lives, and then some time in adulthood start showing various forms of distress from their diets. In western society, wheat is what our diets are based on. We consume wheat at every meal, for dessert, and for snacks -- a huge portion of our calories are in the form of wheat. In addition, our pre-packaged products are full of a long list of artificial ingredients and ingredients that have been so altered that they have no relation to their original form that our ancestors (even 50 years ago) would have found in the grocery stores or on their farms.

Not everyone is genetically programmed to be sensitive to the gluten found in wheat, but it appears that a significant portion of the world's population may be. So our bodies cope with all this vast quantity of gluten as best they can, and then one day, after an illness or a great deal of stress or something that takes its toll on the body, we are too weak to deal with gluten any more, and we start reacting. Because we keep eating wheat, we never give the body a chance to recover from the illness so that it can be strong enough to cope with the huge quantities of gluten. The body becomes sensitized -- it says "I have enough to cope with, I cannot cope with this gluten as well".

That's my theory. Not everyone has the genetic predisposition, but we're all inflicting vast quantities of gluten on our bodies, and some of us just can't cope anymore after a major stress.

--Rheanna

 
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