It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Exercise & Fitness Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-19-2010, 10:35 PM   #1
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 1,440
tjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB User
Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal Study

An interesting research paper came out in 2008:

"Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal Study" by Eliza F. Chakravarty, MD, MS; Helen B. Hubert, PhD; Vijaya B. Lingala, PhD; James F. Fries, MD

This study started in 1984 and tracked groups of 538 runners and 423 non-runners of similar demographics in the 50+ age group. After 21 years, the differences were striking:

* 34% of the non-runners had died, versus 15% of the runners.
* Disability was significantly delayed for the runners compared to non-runners.
* Non-runners died at significantly higher rates than runners from the following conditions:
* 2.1 times for heart disease
* 1.9 times for cancer
* 3.2 times for neurological
* 20.8 (yes, twenty point eight) times for infections
* 3.5 times for other causes

What this basically means is that vigorous exercise, even in late middle age or older ages, significantly improves chances of a long and healthy life. The result really should not be that surprising, since exercise affects so many aspects of health directly and indirectly: body fat percentage, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity / diabetes, blood cholesterol levels, blood pressure, bone density / osteoporosis (for weight bearing exercise).

 
Old 02-20-2010, 09:35 AM   #2
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lady Lake, FL, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,549
JohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Thanks tjlhb,

I'm not against people getting out and running individually to promote health. When it's noncompetitive, it can be consistently moderate or vigorous, rather than ending in extreme exertion.

Having said that, I'm not sure I agree that the study was a very good study. The runners were members of a nationwide running club. As such they were younger and leaner than the control group. Also, less likey to smoke, the report said. I would add that they probably had better eating habits too.

On the other hand, the controls likely ate the standard American diet, were overweight, some may have smoked, and many were relatively inactive. So the outcome of the study could have been due to the fact that the control group did so poorly.

What if at the beginning of the study both groups were the same age, the same leanness, all nonsmokers, and had basically the same good eating habits? And lets throw in one other thing: The control group walks for a 1/2 hour, 4 days per week. What do you think the outcome would have been? I think there would have been very little difference in health status between the two groups.

Last edited by JohnR41; 02-20-2010 at 09:38 AM. Reason: Punctuation

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 02-20-2010, 03:05 PM   #3
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Machaon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Fort Laud
Posts: 3,970
Blog Entries: 22
Machaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB UserMachaon HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjlhb View Post
... This study started in 1984 and tracked groups ... in the 50+ age group. After 21 years, the differences were striking:
At first I felt like the study was just a study in common sense. It has been long known that exercise is one of the best things one can do for their health, especially if one has health problems. But then I looked at the study results and am amazed!

I am close to 70, having suffered with Heart Failure, Permanent Atrial Fibrillation, Immune Dysfunction and Insulin Resistance for over 22 years. It has been a very rough road, especially at my age. But..... since I've added a demanding routine of push-ups, weight lifts, weight curls, steppers and power walking to my exercise routine, I have been getting progressively better. Plus I am benefiting from being in much better physical shape.

Quote:
The result really should not be that surprising, since exercise affects so many aspects of health directly and indirectly: body fat percentage, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity / diabetes, blood cholesterol levels, blood pressure, bone density / osteoporosis (for weight bearing exercise).
Yes, but...... I never really did any exercise before the age of 60. Amazingly, in my 50's my health gradually worsened and my quality of life gradually lessened, but I never associated it with lack of exercise. I was stubborn, and narrow-minded, and never considered exercise as necessary for better health. Plus I was too lazy to exercise. What an idiot, huh!?

Fortunately I woke up before it was too late!

Thanks for posting that interesting, informative article!
__________________
Greatly Improved CHF, A-Fib, HBP, Asthma:

⇒ Eliminate household items that are toxic!
⇒ Balanced, healthy, low glycemic diet
⇒ Lots of Exercise
⇒ Avoid night allergens, toxins
⇒ Coreg!

Last edited by Machaon; 02-20-2010 at 03:07 PM.

 
Old 02-20-2010, 04:02 PM   #4
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 1,440
tjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41 View Post
Having said that, I'm not sure I agree that the study was a very good study. The runners were members of a nationwide running club. As such they were younger and leaner than the control group. Also, less likey to smoke, the report said. I would add that they probably had better eating habits too.
Yes, the runners were less likely to smoke at the beginning (1.9% vs. 9.5%). They were also about 1.5 BMI points lighter (though both groups' averages were within the usual "healthy weight range" -- 22.9 vs. 24.4) and 4 years younger at the start (58 vs. 62). However, these differences narrowed considerably among the completers at the end of the study. The runners also had a much higher percentage of male participants (84% vs. 56%), and being male was associated with increased mortality and decreased disability.

However, in the comment at the end, they do note that, in their analyses, they made statistical adjustments for age, sex, BMI, smoking, total weekly exercise, and initial disability.

They also noted that non-runner completers tended to be the healthier ones of the group (i.e. the sicker non-runners were more likely to have dropped out), while completion / non-completion by the runners did not seem to change the healthiness of the group (so this could have underestimated the benefit of running / exercise).

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41 View Post
The control group walks for a 1/2 hour, 4 days per week. What do you think the outcome would have been? I think there would have been very little difference in health status between the two groups.
By "walking", do you mean slow walking, brisk walking, or race walking (champion race walkers can attain speeds faster than many people can run)? What I would expect is that the race walkers are likely to be the healthiest of the walkers and probably comparable to runners who do similar volume and intensity of exercise, followed by the brisk walkers, followed by the slow walkers, followed by those who do not exercise at all. (Note that other recent studies have found that those who walk faster tend to be healthier than those who walk slower.)

Last edited by tjlhb; 02-21-2010 at 08:14 AM.

 
Old 02-22-2010, 08:04 AM   #5
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lady Lake, FL, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,549
JohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

tjlhb,

Those who belong to running clubs tend to be healthier individuals to begin with. Where I live, many of the most active (runners, cyclists, etc..) were active in sports all of their lives. Many of them have degrees in PE. They are the types who regularly participate in the senior olyimpics. I guess you could say they are the cream of the crop.

If you take this type and put them against a group that has average to poor lifestyle habits, of course running is going to look stupendous. Too bad they didn't have a third group: A walking club.

What was the study designed for? To find out if running is better than being inactive? Of course it is. I would like to know if there's any difference between running and brisk walking.

Then there's an issue we haven't dealt with yet. The issue of wearing out your knees. I met a man in his early 80s who was participating in the senior olympics. He had a degree in PE and was active in sports all of his life. After an event that he participated in, I asked him how he was doing and he said his knees were killing him. From my experience, this is not uncommon.

I plan to live another 40 years (at least) and I don't want to spend my last 20to 30 years with knees that hurt. Knee replacement only lasts about 5 years, even if you don't run.

Last edited by JohnR41; 02-22-2010 at 10:12 AM. Reason: To delete quote

 
Old 02-22-2010, 08:57 AM   #6
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 1,440
tjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

The same authors had another paper "Long Distance Running and Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective Study" which found that distance runners did not have increased rates of osteoarthritis of the knee and did not have more severe osteoarthritis of the knee (as noted by radiographs of knees from 1984 to 2002). Plus, remember that in the other study, the runners had less overall disability, which would presumably include disabling knee problems.

Note also that the previously suggested half hour walk four times per week adds up to only 120 minutes of moderate exercise per week (assuming not race walking). This falls short of the CDC minimum recommended exercise per week for adults, including older adults.

The CDC minimum recommended exercise for adults is 150 minutes of moderate exercise (which the CDC uses brisk walking as an example) or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise (which the CDC uses jogging or running as an example) per week, plus muscle strengthening exercises (like weight training and/or body weight exercises) twice per week. And they suggest doubling that or even more for even greater health benefits.

http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/guidelines/olderadults.html

Last edited by tjlhb; 02-22-2010 at 09:07 AM.

 
Old 02-22-2010, 09:12 AM   #7
Junior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: TO, Canada
Posts: 13
jayjey HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Hi,

The runners in the subject, how long and how fast were they running. Any information.

Thanks.

 
Old 02-22-2010, 11:05 AM   #8
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lady Lake, FL, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,549
JohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

[QUOTE=tjlhb;4190424]The same authors had another paper "Long Distance Running and Knee Osteoarthritis:

I'm glad to hear about Osteoarthritis. However, when I did a search on "Runner's Knee", the information stated that it's a common ailment for runners.


I got the 1/2 hour per day, four days per week from the book, "The Cardiovasculas Cure" by John P. Cooke M.D. PhD. That was part of a regimen to reverse cardiovascular disease. I assume if it's good enough to reverse heart trouble, it can prevent it too. I think everyone should decide based on their health status and family history. For example, there's no heart trouble in my family history.

I checked with two authors I respect: The author of "The China Study" stated that he runs 7 miles per day and he was 70 at the time he wrote his book. The other author, who wrote "Beyond The 120 Year Diet", was not enthusiastic about the idea of running. Specifically, he thought, based on animal experiments, that exercise started late in life could be more damaging than helpful. In other words, exercise could shorten life rather than legnthen it. This is what animal experiments have shown.

 
Old 02-22-2010, 12:56 PM   #9
Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: orange county, NY
Posts: 56
chile2 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41 View Post
Then there's an issue we haven't dealt with yet. The issue of wearing out your knees. I met a man in his early 80s who was participating in the senior olympics. He had a degree in PE and was active in sports all of his life. After an event that he participated in, I asked him how he was doing and he said his knees were killing him. From my experience, this is not uncommon.

I plan to live another 40 years (at least) and I don't want to spend my last 20to 30 years with knees that hurt. Knee replacement only lasts about 5 years, even if you don't run.
I have to agree with the problem of knee replacement. The constant pounding also can lead to the need for hip replacement.

Last edited by mod-anon; 02-22-2010 at 10:06 PM. Reason: editing quote

 
Old 02-22-2010, 01:08 PM   #10
Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: orange county, NY
Posts: 56
chile2 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

I read that research from New York University Medical Center suggested that vigorous exercise increases the risk of developing Atrial Fibrilation. This is a condition characterized by irregular rapid heart beat which affects people in many ways from simple fainting to heart attack or stroke.

 
Old 02-23-2010, 05:57 AM   #11
Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: orange county, NY
Posts: 56
chile2 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

I also read that the number of beats a human heart will beat is set at birth.So some believe that aerobic exercise is dangerous. It is forcing the heart to reach that set number prematurely.

 
Old 02-23-2010, 09:11 AM   #12
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 1,440
tjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41 View Post
The other author, who wrote "Beyond The 120 Year Diet", was not enthusiastic about the idea of running. Specifically, he thought, based on animal experiments, that exercise started late in life could be more damaging than helpful. In other words, exercise could shorten life rather than legnthen it. This is what animal experiments have shown.
It is known that after years of poor lifestyle, one's condition degrades so much that one cannot exercise without high risk of medical problems. For example, the heart attacks on the first snow day of the year due to normally sedentary people with unstable plaques building up in their arteries going out and doing what is for them extremely intense exercise shoveling the snow away from their houses. Or people with sufficiently advanced osteoporosis becoming unable to do any of the weight bearing exercise that, if done prior to getting osteoporosis, would have helped prevent or at least slow down osteoporosis.

But all that means is that one shouldn't wait until one has disabling medical conditions. As well as to follow the usual advice given to beginners, which is to begin within one's own capabilities and work up from there as fitness increases.

 
Old 02-23-2010, 09:15 AM   #13
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 1,440
tjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB Usertjlhb HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by chile2 View Post
I also read that the number of beats a human heart will beat is set at birth.So some believe that aerobic exercise is dangerous. It is forcing the heart to reach that set number prematurely.
Even if this were true (probably not), athletes tend to have much lower resting heart rates because their hearts can pump more blood per beat.

For example, someone who exercises 2 hours per day at a heart rate of 150 beats per minute but has a resting heart rate of 50 beats per minute will have 84,000 beats per day. Compare that to a sedentary person with a resting heart rate of 80 beats per minute who will have 115,200 beats per day. (This example is oversimplified, since most people are not at complete rest when they are not sleeping, so number of beats per day would be greater in both cases.)

Last edited by tjlhb; 02-23-2010 at 10:57 AM.

 
Old 02-23-2010, 10:44 AM   #14
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lady Lake, FL, U.S.A.
Posts: 1,549
JohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB UserJohnR41 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

Quote:
Originally Posted by chile2 View Post
I also read that the number of beats a human heart will beat is set at birth.So some believe that aerobic exercise is dangerous. It is forcing the heart to reach that set number prematurely.
I read about people who have the type of heart that will not respond as usual to vigorous exercise like running. I do a lot of reading and I only read about it once. Some people may have this and never know it.

But the article I read said that it's very rare. I remember when I was in my early 20s trying to start an exercise program and trying to get my heart rate up. I was a good runner but got frustrated when I couldn't get my heart rate up to where it was supposed to be (I was going by a formula that I had read about). I don't remember exactly what my heart rate was but it was something like 85 to 87 beats per minute after running. And when I was resting it was somewhere in the 70s.

So that's one reason why I favor walking over running. I don't want to take a chance; I don't know what the result would be. I should do a search on this but I never have as I don't know the technical name for this condition.

Anyway, it has never bothered me; I'm in perfectly good health with my brisk walking regimen.

 
Old 02-23-2010, 11:48 AM   #15
Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: orange county, NY
Posts: 56
chile2 HB User
Re: Reduced Disability and Mortality Among Aging Runners -- A 21-Year Longitudinal St

I agree that brisk walking is much better for our joints.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Long term disability approved by Metlife- Employer asking job accomodation Q-naire ? rkmgkm Disabilities 13 04-14-2010 07:36 AM
What kind of test should I ask for to check for a premature skin aging? Nichole87 Skin Problems 0 04-02-2009 12:54 PM
Question about disability backslide05 Cancer: Colon 6 04-29-2007 09:25 PM
A Little Help From the Runners dg456 Exercise & Fitness 5 09-14-2006 07:31 PM
21 yrs old and seeing the signs of aging...already! HELP! Cassie4u22 Beauty & Cosmetics 7 11-17-2005 12:48 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



diamond839 (17), janewhite1 (8), lenvegas (8), Titchou (4), tjlhb (4), JohnR41 (3), james079 (3), bdrunner79 (3), sam 23 (3), Bexiesbruv (3)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1006), Apollo123 (906), Titchou (852), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (759), ladybud (755), midwest1 (669), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:56 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!