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Old 03-02-2007, 11:35 AM   #1
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Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Retinal detachment can occur more frequently after surgery for cataracts. The estimate of risk of retinal detachment after cataract surgery is 5 to 16 per 1000 cataract operations.[4]. The risk may be much higher in those who are highly myopic, with a frequency of 7% reported in one study [5]. Young age at cataract removal further increased risk in this study.

The last line is what gets me, young age at cataract removal further increased risk. Aren't cataracts somewhat common with infants? Is that to say that an infant that deals with a cataract removal will have a greater chance of retinal detachment in the future??


edit - Also, what can cause retinal detachment. They said trauma can cause it, but what about like, burning (as in hot fluid splashed up) or not wearing sunglasses?

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-02-2007 at 12:28 PM.

 
Old 03-04-2007, 10:40 AM   #2
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

No, cataracts aren't somewhat common for infants. The wording suggests the risk would be during surgery, not later, but I'm not sure. A child that is born with cataracts, or develops them at an early age, may have other eye problems that put him at risk of a detachment.
Burning the surface of the eye won't cause a retinal detachment, ditto for not wearing sunglasses. Besides trauma, other conditions make a detachment more likely: severe myopia (as mentioned), diabetes, premature birth, growth of blood vessels behind the retina, tugging of the vitreous in some cases.

 
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Old 03-04-2007, 02:23 PM   #3
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Diabetes can increase the risk of detachment?? Man. I wonder why?

When you say burning the surface won't cause retinal detachment, you're talking from a really hot (350ish degrees) fluid, right?

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-04-2007 at 02:24 PM.

 
Old 03-04-2007, 09:13 PM   #4
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Diabetes causes detachments a couple of ways. First, you develop weak blood vessels in the retina which leak fluid beneath the retina causing it to detach. Diabetes can also cause a tractional retinal detachment, which occurs when scar tissue forms, contracts and pulls the retina off.

The point is, if you have diabetes, take care of yourself. Too many people don't.

Oh, and burning the surface of your eye is not going to cause a detachment (within reasonable limits). If you doused yourself with magma or something, that could probably be severe enough to damage the inside of your eye and cause a detachment. But to answer your question, which has been posted on several threads, no, your retinal won't detach.

 
Old 03-05-2007, 03:41 AM   #5
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

So in a nutshell if you were to get burned by something hot enough to even SLIGHTLY increase the chance of retinal detachment you're already facing a lot of other issues anyway.

Is it "typical" to get burned and have blurry eyesight for a few days? Is that just part of the natural cycle your eye takes in repairing itself, or is it a scarier sign?

Edit - Something else I just thought about. Say you get hit in the eye and retinal detachment is a risk. Are you more likely to get retinal detachment in the few minutes/hours/days after the actual incident, or are you at risk for detachment immediately following the incident as you are 45 years down the road?

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-05-2007 at 09:12 AM.

 
Old 03-05-2007, 09:17 AM   #6
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

It depends on the severity of the burn. Splashing hot liquid in your eye, but rinsing it out quickly probably won't cause permanent damage to the cornea. Blurriness for several days would be expected. Since you don't seem to have gotten medical attention for this, can you (or someone else) see any visible signs on the cornea? The eye should be patched and watched for infection. A rinse of warm salt water wouldn't hurt. If the blurriness persists, see a doctor.
If you understand the physiology of the eye you would understand how a surface burn would not affect the retina. My husband burned his eye with caustic soda. That's like having acid thrown in your face. It took a long time, but his cornea healed fine (he had a top-notch doctor) and it in no way affected his retina.

 
Old 03-05-2007, 10:22 AM   #7
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

I don't know statistics....But from personal experience. Yes as an infant I had cataract surgery, and within a few days my left retina detached. Later on my doctor did say cataract surgery does increase the risk, but he never gave me percentages.

 
Old 03-05-2007, 10:26 AM   #8
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Thanks for the info, but I think you misunderstood, this didn't happen to me. It happened to a buddy of mine. This ALMOST happened to me which triggered me to start asking questions about "what could" of happened, etc.

And you're right, I don't know anything about the eye. All I know is I care about the well being of myself and my friends, and when a buddy of mine told me this I figured I'd look around and ask some questions.

He didn't have his eye patched up though. He got his eyes dialated so the eye doc could see inside. The doctor said he had a bit of scarring, but didn't seem concerned about it. But like I said, never got a patch. Just said avoid bright lights and a few days later the vision came back. His left eye had always been a tad worse than the right, and it was the right eye that got hit with the liquid. So when he could see again, and even see a tad better than the left, he knew he was all right.

Also, I found something else out. The liquid wasn't water as I first thought. It was fryer oil, like what you'd typically see in a fast food restaurant. I wonder if the oil would of been any worse than water with making contact with the eye? But again, the doc didn't seem concerned about it. The doc seemed more concerned about getting food particles out of the eye since breaded food items in fryers tend to shed some crumbs in the fryer vats. So I wonder if a piece of a food particle could of caused the scarring? Heh, who knows I guess. He can see so I guess that's what matters.

But, bottom line, when it comes to eye trauma, getting hit in the eye with a bungee cord or baseball or something would be more traumatic than getting 375*F fryer oil in your eye for a second with a water flush following. Am I right?

 
Old 03-05-2007, 10:27 AM   #9
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakota View Post
I don't know statistics....But from personal experience. Yes as an infant I had cataract surgery, and within a few days my left retina detached. Later on my doctor did say cataract surgery does increase the risk, but he never gave me percentages.
So is your vision essentially gone in the left eye??

 
Old 03-08-2007, 12:24 PM   #10
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

New question. I was reading on a web site that nearsighted people are at more of a risk for retinal detachment. Is that true, or is this site bogus? It went on to say you should get your eyes checked every year to prevent this, but I thought I remember reading that retinal detachment was a medical emergency, which made me think you had to rush to the hospital in order to prevent any vision loss... yet it says, to prevent this go annually to make sure? Is this true? Are nearsighted folk at more of a risk for retinal detachment?

Also, even if you have severe nearsightedness, does the statistic still stand that your chances of having it happen to you are about 1 in 300 over the span of a lifetime? (aka, 1 in 15,000 a year).

edit - I just found out some more stats. They say that 40-50% of people that get a retinal detachment have severe myopia (nearsightedness) of 10 or more diopters. I have no idea what 10 diopters means but I assume it's incredibly blurry vision? So realistically, for sake of argument let's say we look at the statistics for a 2 year span. 2 in 30,000 people over a 2 year span is the annual average for retinal detachment. Is that to say that ONE of those TWO people out of the 30,000 is likely to have severe myopia?

As I stated above, they say 40-50% have severe myopia. Which means, "one half" of a person out of 15,000 per year that get retinal detachments are victims of severe nearsightedness. Am I correct? Is this information accurate?

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-08-2007 at 04:03 PM.

 
Old 03-09-2007, 07:17 AM   #11
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

lovinthev8: You & I both mentioned above that severe myopia was a risk factor for detachment, so this is not new. As for the stats, I don't know. I'm still trying to figure out why it's better to switch cases if you're down to one on Deal or No Deal--a fascinating fact, but another can of beans.

Perhaps in your research you came across why the myopic eye is at higher risk of retinal detachment? I'm assuming you did and won't go into it. I'm typing with a migraine aura which makes it hard(er) to see.

 
Old 03-09-2007, 07:27 AM   #12
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Right. Severe myopia is a risk factor for detachment. I understand that. But even still, the stats say an average of 1 person out of 15,000 per year gets a retinal detachment. Do you see where I'm going with this?

If 40-50% (let's use 50% for ease of calculations) of detachment patients have severe myopia, then that would equate to one half of 15,000 people per year, because as the stats say above detachments average 1 out of 15,000 people, and if 50% have severe myopia, that's .5 aka 1/2 of 1 person out of those 15,000.

Therefore, for ease of calculation, across a 2 year span with 30,000 people, 2 people on average will get retinal detachment. Of those 2 people, one will have had severe myopia, hence the 50% above.

Do you understand how I'm twirling these numbers around? Does it make sense? Is it accurate? It's just a bundle of information I read online recently and tried to make sense of it in more realistic terms.

AKA - I fully understand that severe myopia increases risk for retinal detachment. What I'm trying to understand now is the likelyhood of such a thing happening, because even with the "increased risk" it still seems incredibly rare.

EDIT - Due to the lack of responses, I'm adding this:

"Incidence and Prevalence
Retinal detachment is relatively rare and occurs in about one in 15,000 (0.3%) of the U.S. population. It is most common in people middle-aged and older. About 6% of the population has retinal holes, but most of these do not lead to retinal detachment.

Patients who are severely myopic (usually greater than 10 diopters) have a 5% risk for developing a detachment and patients who undergo cataract surgery have a 1% risk. The most common predisposing factor is myopia, accounting for 40% to 50% of detachments. About 33% have undergone cataract removal and 10–20% have experienced eye trauma."

Okay. Explain this to me now. If you have severe myopia, is the 5% they speak of mean that you have a 5% chance in general to develop a detachment, or a 5% chance of being that ONE person out of 15,000 to develop a detachment? It just doesn't make sense to me. It seems like they're throwing around multiple statistics. One says oh, you have a 5% chance, yet there's only a 1 in 15,000 per year chance that you'd get it. I just don't see how 1/15,000 = 5%. Ya know? That's why I ask... if you have severe myopia, does the 5% they speak of mean you have a 5% in general of developing a detachment, or do they mean if you have severe myopia that you have a 5% chance of being the one out of 15,000??

Make sense?

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-09-2007 at 09:01 PM.

 
Old 03-10-2007, 07:05 AM   #13
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

My eyes are glazing over.

 
Old 03-10-2007, 07:07 AM   #14
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

I just woke up and thought about this some more and realized something.

They say on average there is one detachment per year per 15,000 people. So the chances annually are 1/15,000. That roughly equates to 1/300 chance of getting a detachment.

Okay fine.

Now the 5% they spoke about above (saying 5% of people with severe/extreme myopia are likely to get a detachment), I was thinking about this some more. 5% of 100 is the same as 5/100 = 1/20. I read before that if you have severe/extreme myopia, your chances over a lifetime increase from 1/300 to 1/20 for a detachment.

Am I right? That makes a little more sense. The reason I was confused looking back on it is you have 2 stats, 1/300 and 1/15,000. Yet I was expecting 2 stats for myopia too, but all I got was 1/20. The percentage stat threw me off.

Also - Does anybody have any web sites with pictures of what it looks like to be nearsighted? I have a feeling I may be slightly nearsighted.

Last edited by lovinthev8; 03-13-2007 at 08:52 PM.

 
Old 03-13-2007, 08:52 PM   #15
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Re: Question about something I read just now about retinal detachment.

Another question I just thought of. Following an accident to the eye, such as the burn I spoke above about, is it typical to have blurry vision at times, and potentially your vision fading in and out of blackness? This is just following the initial situation (couple days after) I'm not talking like years later.

 
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