It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Healthcare Professionals Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-05-2004, 10:57 PM   #1
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 13
shades of grey HB User
AS or BS in Nursing??

Hi, I just graduated from high school and i'm planning on going to school to become a nurse. But I'm not sure which degree I should aim for. I was hoping that somebody could help me out a bit. Whats the difference between an AS in Nursing and an BS? also, what would you recommend and why? Any advice is much appreciated. Thank you.

 
Old 07-06-2004, 07:29 AM   #2
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Hollywood, FL - USA
Posts: 1,000
KimRick HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

I am currently getting my AS in nursing and then I will go take about 6 months off from school after I'm already a nurse and then go back to further my education. An A.S. degree is an Associate of Science, two year technical degree that will enable you to work in that field after two years. You can also go back after that for your higher degrees. A B.S. is a Bachelors of Science degree and I believe that is your normal 4 year degree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shades of grey
Hi, I just graduated from high school and i'm planning on going to school to become a nurse. But I'm not sure which degree I should aim for. I was hoping that somebody could help me out a bit. Whats the difference between an AS in Nursing and an BS? also, what would you recommend and why? Any advice is much appreciated. Thank you.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 07-08-2004, 08:26 AM   #3
Inactive
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Hollywood, FL - USA
Posts: 1,000
KimRick HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

I know in Florida, with nursing the more degrees you have, the more money there is to be made. I'm currently going for my AS in nursing now and I would evenutually like to become a Nurse Practitioner - how many years of schooling is required to become an NP?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lisa summerford
I have been an RN for 11 years. The only difference in Assoc. Degree,and BS is the initials on the name tag. In my state you don't get anymore pay for a BS,and I know the same is true for several other states. In my opinion,the only reason to go for a BS is if you want to further your career into Nurse Practioner, or instructing in a nursing school.

 
Old 08-27-2004, 12:40 AM   #4
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 33
December716 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

Get a BSN. I'm sorry, but the nursing profession suffers when we settle for lower education standards. No other "professional" career only requires a two year degree. Lawyers, doctors, teachers... they all need a four year degree AT LEAST. And I think they are much more respected than nurses for this reason. [ removed ] I plan on getting my BSN and then my MSN. I know so many BSN's who want the entry level in nursing to be BSN. Some states, like New York, are moving to make BSN the entry level requirement. Hopefully this will be a trend in the right direction for nursing as a profession.

Quote:
I'm currently going for my AS in nursing now and I would evenutually like to become a Nurse Practitioner - how many years of schooling is required to become an NP?
You will need to go through a BSN program (they have accelerated ADN to BSN programs), and then you will need to get your master's to become a NP. NP's carry master's degree, which is another two years after your BSN. I have read of some certificate programs that still exists in California for ADN's and BSN's to become NP's without a master's, but I don't know if these programs are still available, nor do I know if they are all what they claim to be.

Last edited by moderator2; 08-27-2004 at 07:16 PM. Reason: do not post personal webpages or any off board info

 
Old 08-27-2004, 01:34 AM   #5
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 2,943
mel1977 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

December, I am sorry but I have to disagree with you on the degree earned. My mother only has an ADN but is the highest respected RN in her field. She is a CRRN for a major Rehab company and specializes in Brain Injuries. Even the doctors put her to high respect. Also, the DON has her ADN. She knows more about nursing than many RNs I have met who have a BSN. Many of the sups also only have a ADN. Today, the nursing shortage is so severe, it really doesn't make that much of a difference. It all comes down to knowledge and hands on. If an ADN has more hands on experience and 20 years of work she will get hired over a fresh RN out of school with a BSN. I am going for my LPN, then ADN. I have been a nursing asst for six years, and I too am highly respected. I may go for my BSN, which today you can get online, once you have your ADN. My MIL is also an RN, she has her BSN which allows her to hold higher office positions in public health. If you want to climb the career ladder into the big nursing spots, then yes, you may need the BSN. BUT, I disagree. I don't know what your experience is and I don't dis-respect what you have said and written, but I have also been working very closely with nurses, in fact, most of my life. It may be more of an issue in certain states, but Missouri is not one of them. Nevada is even going to allow BSN RNs to teach in nursing school now, they won't require a masters. So, in some ways it looks like they even could be going the other direction. Sorry if I stepped on your toes, but this is just my opinion.

 
Old 08-27-2004, 03:13 PM   #6
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 33
December716 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

You didn't step on my toes! I welcome all opinions and appreciate any feedback! And it does vary state to state, or sometimes hospital to hospital. But I think that's part of the problem. How is the public supposed to respect the profession of nursing when we can't organize ourselves to have a set of core standards for what is a nurse? or what is a nurse educator? etc. I just get frustrated sometimes and rant a little about the issue on a larger scale, not a small scale. Sorry if I offended!

 
Old 08-28-2004, 09:43 AM   #7
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 2,943
mel1977 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

December, I was just curious as to why you think a person is any less of a good nurse just because they don't have a BSN? Have you been around many nurses and had bad experiences with people with their ADN? I thought what really mattered was the quality of care given to people, not whether or not a person had a higher degree. I have seen a lot of really stupid BSN nurses, who have no right working in the nursing field, but that goes for all areas of nursing-CNA, RNs, LPNs. I have worked with RNs for six years, side by side, and unless I ask, I wouldn't know who has a BSN and who has an ADN. We all go through the same clinicals, that is no different. The difference lies in a few classes and maybe pre-reqs. I tell ya, taking Chemistry for my BSN won't make me a better nurse if I didn't take that class cause I didn't need it for my ADN. I guess I just don't see how the nursing profession is suffering b/c we all aren't in for our BSN. I think that is not a very good statement to make, sorry.

 
Old 08-28-2004, 04:16 PM   #8
Senior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Columbus, Ohio, USA
Posts: 119
mfree1 HB User
Lightbulb Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

I am a nurse practitioner, so maybe I can shed some light on your questions and concerns.

There is no national surplus of nurse practitioners. NP's are more common in some areas than others, but the field is growing and new jobs are often becoming available. NP's are less expensive than physicians and have subustantially less expensive malpractice insurance, so we're in a favorable position in today's tough economy.

Some Nurse practitioners are in greater demand than others. Here in Ohio, there are many jobs for NP's in oncology, cardiology, neonatology, and occupational medicine. It's a bit tougher to find work in family practice or pediatrics.

Here's a quote from the Virginia career resource network:
Nationally, the turnover in nursing is at an all-time high, and fewer people are going into the profession. The National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice predicts that we will have 20 percent fewer registered nurses than required by 2010. Declining nursing school enrollments, broader career options for women, and an aging RN population nationwide are the main causes of a shortage that has hospitals and nursing programs looking for ways to increase the number of people entering the nursing profession. Nurse practitioners certified in specialty areas are some of the highest in demand. The job outlook for nurses, is therefore, excellent as more jobs are created for RNs than any other occupation.
As far as salaries go, the mean salary for a primary care nurse practitioner in Miami is about $68,000. (Look on salary.com). New graduates can expect to make less than that; nurse practitioners in specialty areas can make more.

There aren't many NP's who make $100,000. There are some nurse practitioners who own their practices; these NP's tend to make quite a bit of money. But it can take many years to build a practice.

You may hear people say that RN's often make more than Nurse Practitioners. This is often true. An RN with an associate's degree or a bachelor's degree might end up making more money because he or she can pick up overtime, "shift differentials" (working at night or on weekends or holidays), and other bonuses.

I don't mind. I love being a nurse practitioner and I really don't like being a "floor nurse" in the hospital. I don't mind giving up some of my salary for the autonomy, intellectual challenge, and gratification of working as a primary care provider.

Last edited by mfree1; 08-28-2004 at 04:18 PM.

 
Old 08-28-2004, 08:35 PM   #9
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 2,943
mel1977 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

I really enjoyed seeing my NP in Missouri. I had a female PCP as well, but it was easier to see my NP, and I liked them both the same.

 
Old 09-11-2004, 09:53 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 43
tari HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

You need a BSN or equivalent plus a Masters in Nursing to become an NP, right? What I'm asking is that one can't go straight from an A.S. or ADN to NP, but that they need at least 4-year degree.

This has nothing to do with competency. I think this is just a licensing issue.

 
Old 09-21-2004, 11:36 AM   #11
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 2,943
mel1977 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

tari, yes I believe you do have to have your BSN then go for your Masters when it comes to getting your NP license. I don't however know what kinds of courses you have to take.

 
Old 09-21-2004, 09:22 PM   #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 13
99problems HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

Most hospitals require a BSN before one can advance to managment\supervisory positions. Always go for the most education available as it will definitely benefit you and your patients in the long run.
Good luck

 
Old 09-23-2004, 08:18 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 105
stacey01 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

All in all, it depends on the facility and program that is offered by location. Because i can tell you that im finishing a BSN in nursing and FIRST went 2 years to a 4 year university (for a biology degree), then decided to go for nursing at a major area hospital-based professional nursing school for 22months and graduated and got liscensed as an RN , and now finishing a final 3 semesters to finish off the BSN. To be quite honest, I can do my job 100% of the time without a doubt of anything being put in front of me that i dont know how to handle or do. I had quality education with hands-on clinical training. So to the people who tell you that you are going to disgrace the nursing profession by going to a 2 year program and lowering your standards, theyre wrong . I know people that are now working as nursing assistants and lpns because they went throught the BSN programs right away and cannot pass the state exams after repeated attempts to be RN's. If you think nursing is for you then go for it, but i would suggest that you take it step by step instead of trying to go full force into one big giant long program where the end never seems to come. Some people get into nursing school and find it is REALLY not for them. With you being straight out of high school, you may just want to change your mind after you get a taste of it ( or you may even decide that you like nursing even more than before you started). You are going to pay a university around 10,000$(give or take) a year to start something you may not want in the end? Just think about your options, and know what other schools are available to you in your area. Check their credibility and know what the financial and educational differences are between each school. I would suggest that if you get into the nursing field and like it , that yes you ultimately should get than BSN or higher just to improve your profession and mind. If not , thats completely up to you. Good luck and remember to check out all of your options !!

Last edited by stacey01; 09-23-2004 at 08:24 AM.

 
Old 10-12-2004, 11:26 AM   #14
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: usa
Posts: 2,943
mel1977 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

stacey, that was well said. I am going the slower route, but for many reasons. I took some med related classes in highschool and found my niche for nursing (also mom is a RN). I went to a four year college and didn't do well my freshman year, partied too much and didn't take school seriously. So, then I transfered to a private four year. Did better, but fell into depression. It was then I decided to take a year off. I went to work for a private rehab hospital where my mom worked. One year turned into five and i found my calling to be a nurse. I worked on the brain injury unit with my mom as a rehab nursing tech. I loved my job. I had to leave b/c I moved to CA with my husband and it was there I got my CNA and graduated as the Valedictorian. I am now 26, working in NV at the same hospital that I worked for in MO. (on dis. though d/t back injuries). What other nurses tell me as well as my patients just affirms that nursing is my calling and i was given a gift. But, even so, I am in no hurry to get my license. I have learned so much as a CNA and rehab tech. I was doing bowel programs, tube feedings, dressing changes, in and out caths, trach suctioning etc ... as a rehab nursing tech (although I can't do those things as a CNA). I just took the entrance exam for LPN on Saturday, and if I get in, I will do that, then take a year off of school to work and then go for my ADN. I may get my BSN, but we will see. I really don't care at this point to get into higher ed. roles, I just want patient care and interaction right now. I may get into teaching someday, or supervisor, but that is a long way down the road for now. Right now, I am focusing on getting my LPN so I can learn as much as possible there, then I will take the next step. The advice you gave is right on., There is no hurry, and one needs to be sure nursing is for them. Getting experience as a CNA is the perfect place to start too.

 
Old 10-12-2004, 07:05 PM   #15
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 8
bshaw96 HB User
Re: AS or BS in Nursing??

Hello, I have my AS in Nursing and wouldn't have changed it for anything. I worked as a CNA for 3 years, then an LPN for one before getting my RN. I will tell you this. At our hospital, they actually prefer the AS nurses. We had clinical 36 hours a week on top of classes, so lots of experience. The BSN did 2 half days at most. I don't think we should bicker over the degree though, we all pass the same state boards. Here in NC, there is no pay difference, but you do require a BSN for some management positions (the extra 2 years for a BSN is about paperwork, not nursing procedures anyway) and if you want to teach. But most importantly, you're entering a wonderful profession, and we need you. Good luck!!!!!!!!

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
quitting nursing school Tjay718 Healthcare Professionals 17 05-11-2010 03:47 AM
depression and nursing school. Tjay718 Depression 10 04-01-2010 02:19 AM
scared to do nursing again teacher2be Healthcare Professionals 18 03-24-2007 06:44 AM
Capitalize on the nursing shortage crisis! start a nursing agency or medical firm MrRobert Open to All Other Health Topics 0 02-24-2007 06:44 AM
Nursing: some questions. Midget Healthcare Professionals 22 01-18-2007 12:08 AM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:29 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!