It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Heart Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-10-2005, 12:51 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: NH
Posts: 71
KarenBeth HB User
Different types of Arrhythmia

I thought this would be helpful to anyone who wonders the different types of heart arrhythmias . .


Arrhythmia Types
Originating in the Atria
Sinus arrhythmia
Normal cyclic changes in the heart rate during breathing. Common in children and often found in adults.


Sinus tachycardia
The sinus node sends out electrical signals faster than usual, speeding up the heart rate. A heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute.


Sick sinus syndrome
Sometimes the sinus node, as well as the AV node, doesn't work properly. Different combinations of supraventricular arrhythmias, both slow and fast, are produced on an intermittent basis. This condition almost always indicates disease of multiple areas of the heart conduction system. Symptoms of sick sinus syndrome are caused by either too fast or slow heart rate and include near syncope or syncope (passing out due to not enough blood reaching the brain), chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations and stroke.

Holter monitoring (a device continuously recording heart electrical activity for 1-2 days) is often needed to diagnose sick sinus syndrome. A routine EKG often does not show intermittent arrhythmias common in this syndrome.

Bradycardias causing symptoms usually require a pacemaker. Tachycardias are usually treated with medication to slow the heart rate down. Medications are usually started after pacemaker insertion because they can make bradycardias worse.
Premature Atrial Contraction (PAC)
Irregular heart rhythms are most often caused by premature beats or extra beats. These originate in the upper chambers (premature atrial contraction, PAC). When we feel our heart "skip a beat," it usually results from this type of arrhythmia.
The heart does not skip a beat. Instead an extra beat comes sooner than normal. This is followed by a pause that causes the next beat to be more forceful. The person feels this more-forceful beat.

Premature beats are common in healthy people of all ages- most people have them at some time. Caffeine, alcohol, stress and fatigue may cause PAC's to occur more frequently. Usually no special treatment is needed and no cause can be found. The premature beats may disappear, and even if they continue, most people tolerate them well.

Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT)
A series of early beats in the atria speed up the heart rate (the number of times a heart beats per minute). In paroxysmal tachycardia, repeated periods of very fast heartbeats begin and end suddenly.

The most common abnormal tachycardia in children (and common in adults as well) is reentrant supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). It's also known as paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT) or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). The fast heart rate involves both the heart's upper and lower chambers. This isn't a lifethreatening problem for most people. For many, it doesn't require medical therapy. Treatment is considered if episodes are prolonged or frequent. There are several subgroups of SVT, including Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). The heart rate is generally between 160-200 beats per minute which can be tolerated by most people for an extended period of time.


Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
A specific type of SVT this condition is caused by abnormal pathways between the atria and ventricles, causing the electrical signal to arrive at the ventricles too soon and to be transmitted back into the atria. Very fast heart rates may develop as the electrical signal ricochets between the atria and ventricles. Sometimes the heart rate can be very high (200-300 beats per minute). Some medications used to slow regular SVT down can actually make the heart beat even faster in a particular type of WPW.


Atrial flutter
Rapidly fired signals cause the muscles in the atria to contract quickly, leading to a very fast (250-350 atrial beats per minute) and regular heartbeat. There is normally a conduction block at the AV node. That is for any given number of atrial beats reaching the AV node a certain number are blocked. Usually one ventricular beat occurs for every two atrial impulses reaching the AV node. Sometimes 3:1 or even higher block occurs ( that is for every three atrial impulses reaching the AV node one is conducted through to the ventricles).
Atrial flutter almost always occurs in patients with underlying heart disease. Atrial flutter is sometimes seen as a transition rhythm between atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm.

Atrial fibrillation.
Electrical signals in the atria are fired in a very fast and uncontrolled manner. Atrial signals are rapid and chaotic beating upto 400 beats per minute. Instead of a single electrical signal followed by coordinated atrial contraction there is quivering of the atrial muscle. Not all signals are conducted through the AV node. Heart rates may vary from 100 to 180. Irregular beats (unevenly spaced) heart beats always occur with atrial fibrillation. (Heart beats are very fast but regular in PSVT). Atrial fibrillation can occur in a sustained manner or may occur episodically.
The atria do not effectively pump blood. Because most of the blood filling the ventricles does not require atrial pumping (blood flows passively into the ventricles from the atria during the heart's rest cycle) most people still have enough blood flow to the body's organs. Atrial fibrillation is usually due to atrial dilatation and associated with four conditions :

overactive thyroid (Hyperthyroidism)
rheumatic heart disease
prolonged high blood pressure
ischemic heart disease (coronary artery disease)
It may infrequently occur in young to middle aged healthy people.

It is important for your doctor to know is you have atrial fibrillation because of increased risk of stroke. Small emboli ( blood clots) are more likely to form in the atria because blood does not move as well. When these emboli break loose they may travel to the brain or other organs.
Originating in the Ventricles

Premature ventricular complexes (PVC) An electrical signal from the ventricles causes an early heart beat that generally goes unnoticed. The heart then seems to pause until the next beat of the ventricle occurs in a regular fashion. Premature beats are common in healthy people of all ages- most people have them at some time. Usually no special treatment is needed and no cause can be found. The premature beats may disappear, and even if they continue, most people tolerate them well. Occasionally PVC's may be caused by disease or injury to the heart.


Ventricular tachycardia (VT) .
The heart beats fast due to electrical signals arising from the ventricles (rather than from the atria). It's a potentially serious condition that could threaten a person's life. Heart rate ranges from 150 to 200 beats per minute. Certain medications can make this condition worse.
VT almost always results from serious heart disease such as coronary artery disease and acute heart attacks; it usually requires prompt treatment. Ventricular tachycardia, rare in children, occurs more frequently as people age. Often specialized tests, including an intracardiac electrophysiologic procedure (see Special Tests), may be needed to evaluate the tachycardia and the effect of drug treatment. Some forms of VT may not need treatment.

Ventricular fibrillation.
Electrical signals in the ventricles are fired in a very fast and uncontrolled manner, causing the heart to quiver rather than beat and pump blood. This is the rhythm responsible for "shocking" unconscious people on television shows. The ventricle "quivers" with no effective pumping of blood. The heart has not actually stopped. Because the heart does not pump blood to the body a person in ventricular fibrillation loses consciousness immediately.
VF is almost always seen in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Much less commonly it may occur in younger people with normal coronary arteries who have certain inherited heart conditions and in people who have had the heart muscle or conduction system injured by infection (myocarditis). VF may also occur with a very hard blow to the chest, abnormal concentrations of certain minerals in the body, too low a body temperature (hypothermia), and when the amount of certain medications in the body is too high.

Electrical cardioversion, using DC current, is always the first treatment. With an electrical shock, it immediately disrupts a deadly arrhythmia. To have any chance of recovery cardioversion must be done quickly. CPR is started if cardioversion unsuccessful after 3 consecutive attempts.

Cardiac Standstill (Asystole)
Is the complete absence of heart electrical activity. This is often a terminal arrhythmia usually causing death. That is other arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation, progress to asystole if not treated. The heart does not pump or even quiver.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 01-10-2005, 02:39 PM   #2
Senior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 254
stackzone HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Good timing Karen. Im from the high blood pressure and anxiety board. I'm a 29 year old male. Are all of these things above diagnosable by a holter???? I just got done mine.------48 to 150 beats for minute--average 74 beats-normal sinus rhythm. 104 premature atrial contractions--one episode of sustained tach of 150 beats per minute. no pauses no bradycardia. no premature ventrcular contraction recorded. -- I am weaning off of inderal for hbp at this time.+ normal ekg... appt thursday

 
Old 01-10-2005, 04:48 PM   #3
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 209
Kitten1980 HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Thanks Karen, I'm sure that answers a lot of people's questions right off the bat
__________________
"Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things unseen." ~ Hebrews 11:1 ~

 
Old 01-11-2005, 12:06 AM   #4
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 31
tracey louise HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Many many thanks Karen Beth,

I have found this info very helpful and to some extent useful,My problems cover a few of your factual infomation statements.
Traceylouise

 
Old 01-12-2005, 02:46 PM   #5
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: marshall, mi, usa
Posts: 189
babag HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenBeth
I thought this would be helpful to anyone who wonders the different types of heart arrhythmias . .


Arrhythmia Types
Originating in the Atria
Sinus arrhythmia
Normal cyclic changes in the heart rate during breathing. Common in children and often found in adults.


Sinus tachycardia
The sinus node sends out electrical signals faster than usual, speeding up the heart rate. A heart rate greater than 100 beats per minute.


Sick sinus syndrome
Sometimes the sinus node, as well as the AV node, doesn't work properly. Different combinations of supraventricular arrhythmias, both slow and fast, are produced on an intermittent basis. This condition almost always indicates disease of multiple areas of the heart conduction system. Symptoms of sick sinus syndrome are caused by either too fast or slow heart rate and include near syncope or syncope (passing out due to not enough blood reaching the brain), chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations and stroke.

Holter monitoring (a device continuously recording heart electrical activity for 1-2 days) is often needed to diagnose sick sinus syndrome. A routine EKG often does not show intermittent arrhythmias common in this syndrome.

Bradycardias causing symptoms usually require a pacemaker. Tachycardias are usually treated with medication to slow the heart rate down. Medications are usually started after pacemaker insertion because they can make bradycardias worse.
Premature Atrial Contraction (PAC)
Irregular heart rhythms are most often caused by premature beats or extra beats. These originate in the upper chambers (premature atrial contraction, PAC). When we feel our heart "skip a beat," it usually results from this type of arrhythmia.
The heart does not skip a beat. Instead an extra beat comes sooner than normal. This is followed by a pause that causes the next beat to be more forceful. The person feels this more-forceful beat.

Premature beats are common in healthy people of all ages- most people have them at some time. Caffeine, alcohol, stress and fatigue may cause PAC's to occur more frequently. Usually no special treatment is needed and no cause can be found. The premature beats may disappear, and even if they continue, most people tolerate them well.

Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT)
A series of early beats in the atria speed up the heart rate (the number of times a heart beats per minute). In paroxysmal tachycardia, repeated periods of very fast heartbeats begin and end suddenly.

The most common abnormal tachycardia in children (and common in adults as well) is reentrant supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). It's also known as paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT) or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). The fast heart rate involves both the heart's upper and lower chambers. This isn't a lifethreatening problem for most people. For many, it doesn't require medical therapy. Treatment is considered if episodes are prolonged or frequent. There are several subgroups of SVT, including Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). The heart rate is generally between 160-200 beats per minute which can be tolerated by most people for an extended period of time.


Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
A specific type of SVT this condition is caused by abnormal pathways between the atria and ventricles, causing the electrical signal to arrive at the ventricles too soon and to be transmitted back into the atria. Very fast heart rates may develop as the electrical signal ricochets between the atria and ventricles. Sometimes the heart rate can be very high (200-300 beats per minute). Some medications used to slow regular SVT down can actually make the heart beat even faster in a particular type of WPW.


Atrial flutter
Rapidly fired signals cause the muscles in the atria to contract quickly, leading to a very fast (250-350 atrial beats per minute) and regular heartbeat. There is normally a conduction block at the AV node. That is for any given number of atrial beats reaching the AV node a certain number are blocked. Usually one ventricular beat occurs for every two atrial impulses reaching the AV node. Sometimes 3:1 or even higher block occurs ( that is for every three atrial impulses reaching the AV node one is conducted through to the ventricles).
Atrial flutter almost always occurs in patients with underlying heart disease. Atrial flutter is sometimes seen as a transition rhythm between atrial fibrillation and normal sinus rhythm.

Atrial fibrillation.
Electrical signals in the atria are fired in a very fast and uncontrolled manner. Atrial signals are rapid and chaotic beating upto 400 beats per minute. Instead of a single electrical signal followed by coordinated atrial contraction there is quivering of the atrial muscle. Not all signals are conducted through the AV node. Heart rates may vary from 100 to 180. Irregular beats (unevenly spaced) heart beats always occur with atrial fibrillation. (Heart beats are very fast but regular in PSVT). Atrial fibrillation can occur in a sustained manner or may occur episodically.
The atria do not effectively pump blood. Because most of the blood filling the ventricles does not require atrial pumping (blood flows passively into the ventricles from the atria during the heart's rest cycle) most people still have enough blood flow to the body's organs. Atrial fibrillation is usually due to atrial dilatation and associated with four conditions :

overactive thyroid (Hyperthyroidism)
rheumatic heart disease
prolonged high blood pressure
ischemic heart disease (coronary artery disease)
It may infrequently occur in young to middle aged healthy people.

It is important for your doctor to know is you have atrial fibrillation because of increased risk of stroke. Small emboli ( blood clots) are more likely to form in the atria because blood does not move as well. When these emboli break loose they may travel to the brain or other organs.
Originating in the Ventricles

Premature ventricular complexes (PVC) An electrical signal from the ventricles causes an early heart beat that generally goes unnoticed. The heart then seems to pause until the next beat of the ventricle occurs in a regular fashion. Premature beats are common in healthy people of all ages- most people have them at some time. Usually no special treatment is needed and no cause can be found. The premature beats may disappear, and even if they continue, most people tolerate them well. Occasionally PVC's may be caused by disease or injury to the heart.


Ventricular tachycardia (VT) .
The heart beats fast due to electrical signals arising from the ventricles (rather than from the atria). It's a potentially serious condition that could threaten a person's life. Heart rate ranges from 150 to 200 beats per minute. Certain medications can make this condition worse.
VT almost always results from serious heart disease such as coronary artery disease and acute heart attacks; it usually requires prompt treatment. Ventricular tachycardia, rare in children, occurs more frequently as people age. Often specialized tests, including an intracardiac electrophysiologic procedure (see Special Tests), may be needed to evaluate the tachycardia and the effect of drug treatment. Some forms of VT may not need treatment.

Ventricular fibrillation.
Electrical signals in the ventricles are fired in a very fast and uncontrolled manner, causing the heart to quiver rather than beat and pump blood. This is the rhythm responsible for "shocking" unconscious people on television shows. The ventricle "quivers" with no effective pumping of blood. The heart has not actually stopped. Because the heart does not pump blood to the body a person in ventricular fibrillation loses consciousness immediately.
VF is almost always seen in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Much less commonly it may occur in younger people with normal coronary arteries who have certain inherited heart conditions and in people who have had the heart muscle or conduction system injured by infection (myocarditis). VF may also occur with a very hard blow to the chest, abnormal concentrations of certain minerals in the body, too low a body temperature (hypothermia), and when the amount of certain medications in the body is too high.

Electrical cardioversion, using DC current, is always the first treatment. With an electrical shock, it immediately disrupts a deadly arrhythmia. To have any chance of recovery cardioversion must be done quickly. CPR is started if cardioversion unsuccessful after 3 consecutive attempts.

Cardiac Standstill (Asystole)
Is the complete absence of heart electrical activity. This is often a terminal arrhythmia usually causing death. That is other arrhythmias, such as ventricular fibrillation, progress to asystole if not treated. The heart does not pump or even quiver.
i was treated last may/04 for atrial fib and flutter. after 6mos, my cardiologist said i had normal sinus rhythm after wearing a 30 day monitor. still i had episodes of dizziness, weakness, and near fainting. after a bad episode (i have 2-3 a week), they sent me by ambulance from out town to the u of m because our hospt. tested me and said i had 2nd degree heartblock (mobitz type II). after 4 days at the u of m, they came to the conclusion that i have premature atrial contractions. they want to do another radio ablation soon. they are not sure if that will get rid of my episodes.
i feel so like a pin cushion since i have went to the hospt. but am glad i did. all my complaints did not do much for me.

 
Old 05-05-2005, 06:02 PM   #6
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 115
1blueangelz HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Bump...

 
Old 06-19-2005, 10:49 PM   #7
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 2
fivnalllw HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

Does anyone out there take Tambocor for this problem?

 
Old 06-25-2005, 11:21 AM   #8
Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 53
Caroliz HB User
Re: Different types of Arrhythmia

I am not on Tambocor. Today I start NorpaceCL. They took me off Sotolol due to severe side effects.

I am wondering if these are very similar meds.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
sinus arrhythmia lsauren Sinus Problems 1 08-24-2008 10:18 AM
ep study could not induce my arrhythmia chicagoan Heart Disorders 1 04-05-2008 08:09 AM
different types of sores? ember919 Herpes 4 07-22-2007 12:04 PM
arrhythmia affected by body position ljwhorfin Heart Disorders 6 06-09-2006 07:42 AM
CRP. Arrhythmia's, High Blood Pressure and Magnesium gardeninggal High Cholesterol 6 12-27-2005 07:07 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Machaon (77), Vyking (50), sjb (25), JJ (22), ladybud (18), started04 (15), rosier (9), Beefsteak (8), cvcman (8), Bob652 (6)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1006), Apollo123 (906), Titchou (850), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (759), ladybud (755), midwest1 (669), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:18 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!