It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Heart Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-24-2003, 02:05 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 2
NoLesta HB User
Post The Doctors Says I'm OK but...

Hi,
I'm 26 years old. Back in 1997 I began to fill like my heart was skipping. At first I ignored it, then I checked my pulse and it seemed like it would beat normally then all of a sudden it skips then a hard beat. This can go one for days or even a few weeks.

Finally two weeks ago I went to see a cardiologist. She did an EKG and had me wear a 24 hour holter. The doctor told me everything's fine it normal for people's heart to skip sometimes, plus I'm young, it may be anxiety...
Just today, I'm at my job under no stress then my heart starts skipping beats again. I even begin feeling light headed. This can't be normal.
I'm worried and would like to know if anyone can give me some advise.

 
Old 10-24-2003, 04:39 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: port talbot, south wales,UK
Posts: 237
tracey2775 HB User
Post

Hi there, believe me i know exactly what your going through and i also say "this cant be normal". I started having skipped/fast beats when i was 16. Im now 28 and they are still no better. Ive had 4 ecg's and wore a 24 heart monitor which have all shown up normal. But the thing im trying to get across to my doctor is, because i didnt have weired beats when wearing the monitor or ecg's, maybe there IS something wrong and the monitor didnt pick it up. All im told is that its all stress/anxiety, which i do suffer badly with, but id STILL say i have a problem with my heart no matter what the doc says.

------------------
tracey
__________________
tracey

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 10-28-2003, 06:52 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 2
NoLesta HB User
Post

Hi Tracey,

Thanks for replying. It good to know I'm not the only one going through this.

 
Old 10-30-2003, 04:21 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Alberta Canada
Posts: 189
crabbycdn HB User
Post

You have both encountered a serious condition afflicting a vast number of physicians. Patients have various names for it but I like to call it "Headupthebuttitis". Some physicians like to believe that all that money they spent on their educations have made them god's left-hand (or god, himself). Those afflicted with headupthebuttitis do not like to admit that they do not know so it becomes YOUR fault. YOU are anxious, YOU are stressed out. They don't know the answer, so therefore it MUST be anxiety or stress. It could very well be that you were not symptomatic when you were being monitored - it happens. I had a family doctor who would not believe that I was having seizures until one day the flourescent light started to flicker in his office and I had one right there. If you can learn anything TRUST YOURSELF!
__________________
Life....nobody gets out alive....so laugh and slam the door when you leave!

 
Old 11-06-2003, 01:58 PM   #5
Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 76
sugarplum_pdx HB User
Quote:
Originally Posted by crabbycdn
You have both encountered a serious condition afflicting a vast number of physicians. Patients have various names for it but I like to call it "Headupthebuttitis". Some physicians like to believe that all that money they spent on their educations have made them god's left-hand (or god, himself). Those afflicted with headupthebuttitis do not like to admit that they do not know so it becomes YOUR fault. YOU are anxious, YOU are stressed out. They don't know the answer, so therefore it MUST be anxiety or stress. It could very well be that you were not symptomatic when you were being monitored - it happens. I had a family doctor who would not believe that I was having seizures until one day the flourescent light started to flicker in his office and I had one right there. If you can learn anything TRUST YOURSELF!
I think that's a really cynical way of looking at it. Most doctors do have your best interests at heart. They just know that often it IS caused by anxiety, because they've done tests to rule other things out. The chances of a 26 year old having an actual heart problem when they've had a normal EKG and holter monitor report are very slim, assuming there are no other unusual risk factors. Would you rather have doctors rush to prescribe medications that might not be warranted?

I also don't agree that you should not believe what a doctor tells you, and that you should "trust yourself" instead. Yes, you should definitely be checked out if you think something is unusual, and if you continue to have symptoms that are extremely worrisome, by all means get a second opinion if you feel your first doctor wasn't thorough enough. But it's pointless to just refuse to believe a doctor when they've done an EKG and a holter monitor and they say you're okay. PVC's (palpitations) are widely known to be VERY common, and usually harmless. They ARE often caused by anxiety. So if your doctor has done the appropriate tests and says that there's no evidence you have a heart problem, believe him! And try to enjoy life. I've had to learn to do that, myself. If I went around believing every little thing I felt was a serious problem, and not believing any of my doctor's reassurances, I'd be living in hell.

 
Old 11-07-2003, 11:17 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 16
dgarneau HB User
Strange, but I agree with crabby more than sugarplum. I've had PVCs for several years and they're getting worse, even though I'm on a beta-blocker. I get them up to 600 times a day, sometimes in triplets. Often I get them just after going up a short flight of stairs. Sometimes they start up for no reason at all. The stress factor, which can contribute to increases in PVCs is like a Catch-22--you worry because you have PVCs and you have PVCs because you worry about them. HOW CAN YOU NOT WORRY ABOUT THEM??? Do doctors think that just because PVS are not serious that patients won't be scared stiff anyway? I think doctors MUST find better ways to help their patients cope with the problem of thinking they're going to drop dead of a heart attack. They MUST recognize that a patient's fear may be more debilitating than the PVCs. Sometimes I'm afraid to leave the house, exercise or do anything strenuous at all. At times, PVCs control my life. If doctor's cannot cure the PVCs (and obviously they can't), then they have an obligation to their patients to recognize and treat the accompanying anxiety.

 
Old 11-09-2003, 06:15 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Posts: 161
Jordie HB User
I get the same thing and I've also had ECG's etc. I suffer from anxiety and it's actually happening to me now. It's 1am and I've had to get up and try to occupy myself for a bit. Even though I know my heart is fine, it's still very scary and disconcerting. I've just taken a sleeping tablet so hopefully that will enable me to sleep - I have to be up for work at 6am.
I agree too that doc's need to treat the accompanying anxiety much better and not just say there's nothing they can do.

 
Old 11-09-2003, 11:10 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 16
dgarneau HB User
Jordie, I think high-anxiety people like me and possibly you are predisposed to getting PVCs. From what I've read about other people with our condition, stress seems to be a major contributor. I used to be quite agoraphobic starting around age 22 (I'm now 48) and even though I'm much better now, I can add PVCs to my current list of irrational fears (i.e. stressors). I also think that being tired makes them worse. The more sleep I can get, the better I feel. It's difficult, though, when they wake you up at night. Concentrating on something else helps me cope (takes my mind off them), too. If you ask me, stress is a big factor in quite a few things, like gum disease, heart disease, and digestive problems, which many people with PVCs have. Sometimes I think that when people say that PVCs come "out-of-the-blue," it may just be that they don't realize that they are actually stressed about something or that they are reacting to something on a higher level than usual, like extreme happiness/pleasure, which can produce much the same type of reaction as negative feelings (increase in heart rate and blood pressure, for example). Anyway, I'm thinking about taking Tai Chi as a relaxation/stress reducing technique. Hope you're feeling better REAL soon! <hug>

 
Old 11-19-2003, 12:23 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 204
rubindj HB User
If you feel that you need it, go and ask for a 30-day loop monitor. These are monitor's that record an EKG contineously like a holter, but when you feel a "skipped" beat you press a button and it transmits a 30 second EKG (10 seconds before and 20 seconds after) to the doctor to look at. You wear this for 30 days instead of 24 hours, so the event will more than likely happen during this time period

This may or may not be covered by your insurance company since your doctor hasn't actually diagnosed a condition and will probably cost 1K-2K.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Doctors can't figure out so I am researching allergyqueen Epilepsy 5 07-12-2007 09:12 PM
Fed up with doctors, hospitals and tests ANNETTE73 Arthritis 6 12-12-2006 08:04 AM
Drug companies pile on perks for doctors HubbleRules High Cholesterol 3 04-21-2005 03:46 AM
rant about doctors tintx Spinal Cord Disorders 19 12-12-2004 10:31 AM
sick of these doctors Linma2428 Menopause 21 11-13-2004 08:57 AM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



Machaon (74), Vyking (50), sjb (25), JJ (22), ladybud (18), started04 (15), cvcman (8), Beefsteak (8), Fizzickle (6), Lenin (6)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1136), MSJayhawk (941), Apollo123 (856), janewhite1 (823), Titchou (771), Gabriel (743), ladybud (667), sammy64 (666), midwest1 (655), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:44 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Copyright and Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!