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Old 04-05-2013, 04:47 PM   #1
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tygiag HB User
Does this sound like a hormone problem????

I am in my early 30's. My body does not seem to handle stress well at all, never has.

I went through about 3 months straight with extreme anxiety about 2 years ago. This passed and ever since I have began to experience some symptoms which have progressively gotten worse over the last 2 years.

Now in all semi stressful situations ie: work, talking with strangers, etc I have been experiencing: Brain fog, cognitive decline, concentration problems, extreme fatigue, slurred speech, dry mouth, trouble pronouncing words with more then 3 syllables, trouble talking in general.

My doctor insists that it is anxiety, however I know what anxiety feels like and this is not even close to anxiety. Upon his request I took xanax and it does nothing for these symptoms.

It is almost like my body cannot handle any stressful situation anymore. Is anybody familiar with these symptoms and is there hope to finding a solution?!

I am hopeful that it has something to do with a hormone such as thyroid, dhea, preg etc.

Last edited by tygiag; 04-05-2013 at 05:39 PM.

 
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Old 04-21-2013, 11:11 AM   #2
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iCeNN HB User
Re: Does this sound like a hormone problem????

Quote:
Originally Posted by tygiag View Post
I am in my early 30's. My body does not seem to handle stress well at all, never has.

I went through about 3 months straight with extreme anxiety about 2 years ago. This passed and ever since I have began to experience some symptoms which have progressively gotten worse over the last 2 years.

Now in all semi stressful situations ie: work, talking with strangers, etc I have been experiencing: Brain fog, cognitive decline, concentration problems, extreme fatigue, slurred speech, dry mouth, trouble pronouncing words with more then 3 syllables, trouble talking in general.

My doctor insists that it is anxiety, however I know what anxiety feels like and this is not even close to anxiety. Upon his request I took xanax and it does nothing for these symptoms.

It is almost like my body cannot handle any stressful situation anymore. Is anybody familiar with these symptoms and is there hope to finding a solution?!

I am hopeful that it has something to do with a hormone such as thyroid, dhea, preg etc.
Wow with the exception of a couple symptoms, you sound just like me! I have suffered from low testosterone for years, but my health declined when I stopped a med that was controlling my anxiety a bit. Anyways back to you. Definitely see an endocrinologist and have him/her do a complete thyroid panel(T4, T3, TSH, antibodies, Reverse T3, etc), and Saliva cortisol test 4 times a day-it is very important to have cortisol levels checked 4 times a day, because one morning salivary cortisol doesn't tell you anything. For example you could have normal, or low normal morning cortisol, but high afternoon cortisol. The times should be 8 AM, 12 PM, 4 PM, and 12 AM. High/low cortisol can definately cause anxiety, and inability to handle stress well. Also have your Free and Total testosterone levels checked out. Your testosterone levels *may* have decreased resulting in your symptoms. Besides these, it also will be good to see how your DHEA is doing, and checking progesterone won't hurt . Although I think most likely it's either some form of hypothyroidsm, low Testosterone(or a combo of hypothyroidism and low testosterone), or abnormal cortisol levels-either too low or too high. Things you should watch out for when you see your doctor:

First off some doctors don't do full thyroid panels. Insist that you are having serious symptoms and you want to make sure EVERYTHING is working at an optimal level or close to optimal as it should. And when the results of the thyroid come back if your TSH is high normal, and your T$/T3 are low normal, that could very well mean that your thyroid isn't working working properly, but some docs just look at the "normal" range and base their diagnosis off of that. So it is important that you find a good reputable doctor.

Second, your doctor may say that checking cortisol 4 times a day is "going overboard" or "not necessary". That is false and you be able to see that for yourself by doing a google search or asking a good doctor. If this happens, tell your doctor that checking cortisol once a day is quite useless, becuase what if I have high afternoon cortisol, but my morning cortisol falls within the range? And if the doc refuses to order the proper testing, see a different doctor. Be very assertive., as this is your life and health we're talking about here.

Third, if your Testosterone is "within range", but on the low side, and everything else checks out ok, in that scenario the testosterone is probably the culprit. Some doctors don't understand the impact that a low "normal" Testosterone can have on a man's health. Some will just look at the range of 240-100 and if the testosterone falls anywhere within the range, they just call it normal. BUT, this range is for men of ALL AGES. For someone in their early 30's, normal total testosterone is probably in the 400 range(I could be wrong, I'm giving an educated guess). Now having said that, that doesn't necessarily mean that if someone in their early 30's has a testosterone of let's say 390 he is going to experience symptoms, because since our bodies are different, what may be normal for someone may be too low for someone else. And if someone has a pre-existing anxiety disorder and has a low Testosterone for their age group(like me), the low T will have more of an impact on him and his sense of well being. The Brain fog, cognitive decline, concentration problems, and extreme fatigue, are usually signs of a low testosterone and/or thyroid issues, although the extreme fatigue may indicate there's something else going on. It MAY. Because USUALLY(not all the time) people complaining of extreme fatigue have adrenal fatigue, where their cortisol levels have dropped too low. Now the only way to find what is truly going on is to have proper testing done, and I'm just trying to list all the different possibilities, not worry you. You have enough on your hands.

ALSO: Check your vitamin B12, Vitamin D, Iron, and Magnesium levels. Also ask your doctor what other tests you could have done that could give you and your a doctor a better clue.
Anyways I hope this helped, and I truly hope you follow through and reach optimum health, both physically and mentally. Best wishes.

 
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:48 PM   #3
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Join Date: Apr 2013
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tygiag HB User
Re: Does this sound like a hormone problem????

Quote:
Originally Posted by iCeNN View Post
Wow with the exception of a couple symptoms, you sound just like me! I have suffered from low testosterone for years, but my health declined when I stopped a med that was controlling my anxiety a bit. Anyways back to you. Definitely see an endocrinologist and have him/her do a complete thyroid panel(T4, T3, TSH, antibodies, Reverse T3, etc), and Saliva cortisol test 4 times a day-it is very important to have cortisol levels checked 4 times a day, because one morning salivary cortisol doesn't tell you anything. For example you could have normal, or low normal morning cortisol, but high afternoon cortisol. The times should be 8 AM, 12 PM, 4 PM, and 12 AM. High/low cortisol can definately cause anxiety, and inability to handle stress well. Also have your Free and Total testosterone levels checked out. Your testosterone levels *may* have decreased resulting in your symptoms. Besides these, it also will be good to see how your DHEA is doing, and checking progesterone won't hurt . Although I think most likely it's either some form of hypothyroidsm, low Testosterone(or a combo of hypothyroidism and low testosterone), or abnormal cortisol levels-either too low or too high. Things you should watch out for when you see your doctor:

First off some doctors don't do full thyroid panels. Insist that you are having serious symptoms and you want to make sure EVERYTHING is working at an optimal level or close to optimal as it should. And when the results of the thyroid come back if your TSH is high normal, and your T$/T3 are low normal, that could very well mean that your thyroid isn't working working properly, but some docs just look at the "normal" range and base their diagnosis off of that. So it is important that you find a good reputable doctor.

Second, your doctor may say that checking cortisol 4 times a day is "going overboard" or "not necessary". That is false and you be able to see that for yourself by doing a google search or asking a good doctor. If this happens, tell your doctor that checking cortisol once a day is quite useless, becuase what if I have high afternoon cortisol, but my morning cortisol falls within the range? And if the doc refuses to order the proper testing, see a different doctor. Be very assertive., as this is your life and health we're talking about here.

Third, if your Testosterone is "within range", but on the low side, and everything else checks out ok, in that scenario the testosterone is probably the culprit. Some doctors don't understand the impact that a low "normal" Testosterone can have on a man's health. Some will just look at the range of 240-100 and if the testosterone falls anywhere within the range, they just call it normal. BUT, this range is for men of ALL AGES. For someone in their early 30's, normal total testosterone is probably in the 400 range(I could be wrong, I'm giving an educated guess). Now having said that, that doesn't necessarily mean that if someone in their early 30's has a testosterone of let's say 390 he is going to experience symptoms, because since our bodies are different, what may be normal for someone may be too low for someone else. And if someone has a pre-existing anxiety disorder and has a low Testosterone for their age group(like me), the low T will have more of an impact on him and his sense of well being. The Brain fog, cognitive decline, concentration problems, and extreme fatigue, are usually signs of a low testosterone and/or thyroid issues, although the extreme fatigue may indicate there's something else going on. It MAY. Because USUALLY(not all the time) people complaining of extreme fatigue have adrenal fatigue, where their cortisol levels have dropped too low. Now the only way to find what is truly going on is to have proper testing done, and I'm just trying to list all the different possibilities, not worry you. You have enough on your hands.

ALSO: Check your vitamin B12, Vitamin D, Iron, and Magnesium levels. Also ask your doctor what other tests you could have done that could give you and your a doctor a better clue.
Anyways I hope this helped, and I truly hope you follow through and reach optimum health, both physically and mentally. Best wishes.
I take B12, D3 and Mag every day. I sure hope it is either a Testosterone or Thyroid problem. My old primary doc keeps telling me it is anxiety and depression, however I am not depressed or anxious about anything. He kept telling me that I am and I just don't know it. HOW RIDICULOUS IS THAT?!?!

He takes no labs and gives me some diagnosis and some SSRI's that I refuse to take. Guy is a clown.

 
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Old 04-23-2013, 10:55 PM   #4
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 19
iCeNN HB User
Re: Does this sound like a hormone problem????

Quote:
Originally Posted by tygiag View Post
I take B12, D3 and Mag every day. I sure hope it is either a Testosterone or Thyroid problem. My old primary doc keeps telling me it is anxiety and depression, however I am not depressed or anxious about anything. He kept telling me that I am and I just don't know it. HOW RIDICULOUS IS THAT?!?!

He takes no labs and gives me some diagnosis and some SSRI's that I refuse to take. Guy is a clown.
Please for your own good, find another primary doctor. And I don't think it would hurt to see an endocrinologist either. It's sad to say that a lot of doctors these days just don't "get" it, you know what I mean? Like you can TELL by their facial expressions and how they respond that they just don't have a clue how much of impact a hormonal imbalance can have on a person's well being and sense of well being. Like I had a urologist tell me I could just live with a testosterone of 230 at the age of 21, and have no problems-Are you kidding me? I'm suffering everyday due to my low T. And sometimes they don't take a word you say seriously and blame potential hormonal imbalances on psychiatric issues (like your case). Sorry if that sounded like a rant, but if you think about it what I said is true(there are fortunately some exceptional doctors out there however though). But I hope you follow through with finding a better doc, and hopefully he/she will understand and believe your symptoms and give you the proper testing and treatment. Best wishes.

 
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:06 AM   #5
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Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 13
dominomo HB User
Re: Does this sound like a hormone problem????

IceNN in my opinion, is correct. Many doctors dont' understand nor appreciate what it is like to suffer from this. They don't see a broken bone sticking out. so it's hard to diagnose. and the effects take months if not years to fully emerge.

My story played out over 6 years , with the symptoms getting worse each time I went to the doctor and each time I had blood work done.
it was only when I found another doctor AND when I completely fell apart that anything was done.

low Testo is often associated with low thyroid and the combination is often associated with higher than desirable prolactin levels.

rule out pituitary tumor and then try to figure if it is primary or secondary via LH & FSH testing.

in my experience, the guys end up on :

Synthroid - 100 - 175 ug/day
Testosterone Injections - 200 mg/week or whatever gets you to 600-900 bloods.
cabergoline, as necessary, to reduce the rise in prolactin ( this seems inevitable )
and AI or similar to reduce the estrogen ( also inevitable )
Vit D- 2000 IU per day.

Few people ever find out a 'root cause " of their hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. it will be listed as idiopathic .

most often I hear people state that " I was under incredible stress " for a long long time and then suddenly, everything quit on them.

and then it was a long slow horrible crawl into the darkness.

 
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Old 06-20-2013, 09:57 AM   #6
Junior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 13
dominomo HB User
Re: Does this sound like a hormone problem????

IceNN in my opinion, is correct. Many doctors dont' understand nor appreciate what it is like to suffer from this. They don't see a broken bone sticking out. so it's hard to diagnose. and the effects take months if not years to fully emerge.

My story played out over 6 years , with the symptoms getting worse each time I went to the doctor and each time I had blood work done.
it was only when I found another doctor AND when I completely fell apart that anything was done.

low Testo is often associated with low thyroid and the combination is often associated with higher than desirable prolactin levels.

rule out pituitary tumor and then try to figure if it is primary or secondary via LH & FSH testing.

in my experience, the guys end up on :

Synthroid - 100 - 175 ug/day
Testosterone Injections - 200 mg/week or whatever gets you to 600-900 bloods.
cabergoline, as necessary, to reduce the rise in prolactin ( this seems inevitable )
and AI or similar to reduce the estrogen ( also inevitable )
Vit D- 2000 IU per day.

Few people ever find out a 'root cause " of their hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. it will be listed as idiopathic .

most often I hear people state that " I was under incredible stress " for a long long time and then suddenly, everything quit on them.

and then it was a long slow horrible crawl into the darkness.

 
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