It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Inner Ear Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-07-2005, 09:10 PM   #1
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Many of you may be familiar with this information, but I am now 6 months into my vestibular disorder and just came across it last week - I only wish I'd heard it sooner. My ENT and physical therapist were genuinely interested, seemed as if they'd not heard it before. If it helped me, then maybe it can help someone else.

I have worn monovision contact lenses for years, never had a problem with making the adjustment to them. (Monovision means I wear my reading prescription contact lens in one eye, my distance prescription lens in the other.) I never correlated the "brain work" that has to take place with monovision (or bifocals, and progressive eyeglasses for that matter) as something that might interfere with my vestibular compensation until I read a particular article that said that uncompensated vestibular patients may be much better off not wearing bifocals, progressive eye glasses, or monovision contact lenses. This particular article said, "If you put on bifocals, your brain has to switch ratios back and forth rapidly as you look through the tops or the bottoms. The problem is more complex with trifocals and really ugly with progressive addition lenses. With progressives, gradual changes in optical magnification occus as you look form the middle fo the lens to the reading area. This means your brain must change the VOR ratio constantly as you look up and down through the lens. This extra work is not fun for an already overloaded brain. In addition, the progressives have zones of distortion in the lower corners of the lenses; the distortions make the brain work even harder...Monovision contact lenses have a different power for each eye, so that one eye is focused for distance, and the other eye is focused for near work. This reduces the ability of the eyes to work together, which might not be desirable for a vestibular patient." This particular dr. goes on to recommend that vestibular patients talk to their eye drs. about their condition, and recommends that those needing help for distance and reading have 2 separate pairs of glasses. (I'm hoping to be able to just keep my distance contacts in, and then put the reading glasses on top of them, when necessary. I talk to my eye dr. tomorrow about the whole thing.)

All I can say is that as soon as I took out my reading contact lens and replaced it with another distance lens, I felt incredible relief. No, my vestibular symptoms didn't disappear, but in some indescribable way, I just felt so much better and more comfortable.

Just thought I'd pass it on to anyone who might benefit from this and hadn't heard about it before!

Sending greetings from CA, Robin

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 06-07-2005, 10:30 PM   #2
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 2,297
studyin HB Userstudyin HB Userstudyin HB Userstudyin HB Userstudyin HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts...

Hi Robin,

Great to hear you found relief like that. I can tell you from my experience that visual input plays a *huge* part in this thing. If you muck around with your eyes it can bring on the symptoms pretty quick. Thankfully I don't need glasses otherwise it would have been yet one more thing to sort out.

Subs has some good experience and may add something. He basically was unable to compensate until the good people at Uni of Penn spotted an eye glasses issue which, when sorted out, sent him to 100% land.

Looks like you'll be sitting next to him on the 100% bench soon.

Cheers...Scott

 
Old 06-08-2005, 06:01 AM   #3
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chester Springs, PA, USA
Posts: 1,674
Subs30 HB UserSubs30 HB User
Cool Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Hi Robin

Excellent info and right on target---vision---plays a huge roll in our balance---40% of the info provided to the brain's equilibrium center---when we have no vestibular injury is provided by vision---with a vestibular injury---the 30% normally provided by the vestibular system---is reduced---since the brain---detects it as---unreliable---and therefore increases(accepts) increased signal input from vision---so it's signals need to be accurate.....

If you look at the "sticky post" first one at the top of this board---and scroll down to: (which has been preapproved by Mod 1)

Sensory Conflict and Other Causes of Dizziness: Etiology, Differential Diagnosis, and Management - Robert L Yolton PhD

[url]http://www.opt.pacificu.edu/ce/catalog/COPE7282/Dizzy.html[/url]

the effects of poor vision or problem vision---while an issue---without---a vestibular injury----for anyone---is a huge problem---for someone with a vestibular problem......for example---it clearly calls out what you are posting about:

..."Spectacles Can Cause Dizziness

When the head moves from side to side, the vestibular system detects this motion and sends a message to the eye muscle control systems causing the eyes to move counter to the head movement. This allows gaze to be held still as the head moves. The process is called the Vestibular-Ocular Reflex (VOR). Failure of this mechanism can cause oscillopsia (bouncing vision) when a patient walks or otherwise moves the head.

To operate properly, the ratio (sometimes called the gain) of vestibular movement signals to the amount of compensating eye movements must be correct. If the eyes move too much or too little in response to a head movement, a sensory conflict results and the patient gets sick.

If there is a significant power change in the patient's new glasses, the image has been made larger or smaller on the retina so the VOR gain must be re-calculated by the brain. For some patients this is easy to do (a no-brainier), but for others it takes time - up to several weeks. And some never manage the task. This is why some patients experience transient dizziness caused by their new lenses.

Now consider the patient whose vestibular system is a little shaky to begin with and who needs bifocals or progressive addition lenses. In addition to the distortions on the periphery of the lenses, consider the range of VORs the brain has to calculate. A different one is needed for every spot on the lens because the powers are different at each spot.

CLINICAL PEARL. NEVER GIVE A PATIENT WITH A HISTORY OF DIZZINESS OR VESTIBULAR PROBLEMS A PROGRESSIVE ADDITION LENS. IN FACT DO NOT EVEN GIVE THEM A BIFOCAL. GIVE THEM SEPARATE NEAR AND DISTANCE LENSES SO THAT THE BRAIN HAS TIME TO RECALCULATE THE VOR AS THE PATIENT CHANGES GLASSES."....

And as the Professor/Dr points out there are many other issues/problems---in the vision area---for vestibular injuries....the bottom line:

Vision can prevent you from full compensation(100%)---after a vestibular injury,i.e., BPPV, VN, Lab...etc...ignore it---and you have a long---painful---road---to travel....in recovering from this junk.......

Read---the post in the sticky---it will be worth the time...it gave me my clue---as to why I was stuck---at---70 to 80% compensation---for months---the folks at the Univ of Penn Balance Center---confirmed it---and then fixed it...and within about two to three months of VRT etc...went to 100% and have stayed there for two years.....(the recovery period lasted 13/14 months..Vn to Lab to BPPV)......worth the read:

Sensory Conflict and Other Causes of Dizziness: Etiology, Differential Diagnosis, and Management - Robert L Yolton PhD

[url]http://www.opt.pacificu.edu/ce/catalog/COPE7282/Dizzy.html[/url]

P.s. there are many more vision issues---"ID" by Prof Yolton--that impact---us---when we have this type of injury---unfortunately!!!!---and---as he points out---easly tested for--and correctable....




 
Old 06-08-2005, 08:40 AM   #4
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Scott, thanks for your input! Though both my physical therapist and my ENT feel it will take me a good year to recover, I cannot wait to be sitting on that 100% bench with Subs!!

Subs, your input couldn't have come at a more appropriate time! I am off to see my eye doctor today and have printed up the very website you cited - another area in this complex, miserable vestibular journey about to be addressed! YEA!

Thanks again - here's yet another reason why this board is so incredibly helpful in guiding us vestibulopathy newcomers to higher, steadier ground!!!!

Greetings from CA,
Robin

 
Old 06-08-2005, 12:59 PM   #5
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Subs, a quick question for you...
In all of your experience and research in this area, do you think it's possible for a compensated vestibular patient to eventually go back to the bifocals, progressive lenses or monovision contacts? Just wondering what your thoughts are on this.
Thanks!
Robin

 
Old 06-08-2005, 03:34 PM   #6
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chester Springs, PA, USA
Posts: 1,674
Subs30 HB UserSubs30 HB User
Cool Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyblond
Subs, a quick question for you...
In all of your experience and research in this area, do you think it's possible for a compensated vestibular patient to eventually go back to the bifocals, progressive lenses or monovision contacts? Just wondering what your thoughts are on this.
Thanks!
Robin
Hi Robin

Yep---do not know about bifocals/monovision contacts---but Progressive Lens---yep!!

Went to them(for first time ever) about six months after full 100% compensation---that would be about one and half years ago.

Had no problem at all---it would prob vary---with the type of vestibular injury/person---but had no prob.



P.s. Forgot to mention---before---after I stumbled on the "clue" that vision could be a problem

----that Univ of Penn--Balance Center Team---confirmed the vision problem and fix---with the Neuro-Ophthalmologist---who was a member of their medical team---only after---I went through their entire standard work up/tests---they did not take any previous Dx/Doc's/tests---as a/the basis for their Dx & Fix decisions---think the felt--it is just to complex a medical issue---to "bet the ranch" on previous data collected---under circumstances---where they had no insight into the Quality of that data/tests...

I suspect---they are/were well aware---that there is a problem in the medical communities Dx/Testing in this area.....


 
Old 06-08-2005, 05:32 PM   #7
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Thanks so much - it is so encouraging to me that you have been able to handle the progressives! (As Dr. Yolton mentions, progressives can the hardest of all to handle, due to all the minute and many changes up and down the lens.) I am already missing my monovision desperately in just the 2 days I've gone without, and am thrilled to hear that it just might be a possibility again sometime in the future!

Extremely interesting what you've experienced, Subs! Am I understanding correctly that you pointed the Univ. to the direction of possible vision issues, at which point they picked up the ball and found the problem? I can now add yet another dr. (my eye dr.) who found the information I brought from this health board (and referring articles) significant. In fact, he is going to contact Dr. Yolton to learn more about this whole aspect of treating the vestibular patient! Without a doubt, it really pays for us to be well informed!!

Please don't ever leave this board - all of us who are so new at this need you and the others - you are all the voice of hope for us who are still in the throes of it all!!!

Thanks again!
Robin

 
Old 06-08-2005, 07:03 PM   #8
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chester Springs, PA, USA
Posts: 1,674
Subs30 HB UserSubs30 HB User
Cool Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Hi Robin

...."you pointed the Univ. to the direction of possible vision issues, at which point they picked up the ball and found the problem"....


Not exactly---I read the article--suspected that was my problem---and scheduled into Univ of Penn Balance Center

---told them what my guess was---they listened---made a note of it---said---if that is the case---then what we are about to do to you---will show it...and away they went......two days of it........turned out to be it...They are good---no question about it....

..."another dr. (my eye dr.) who found the information I brought from this health board (and referring articles) significant"....

Great---another Doc---with his stuff together in one sock!!


 
Old 06-09-2005, 09:51 AM   #9
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Hi Subs,

Was the experience at the U of P far different than what you had encountered with your previous health care providers? (ENT, etc.) I suppose that's a silly question - I would have to assume it would be. Just interested in what other testing they did, and how they further evaluated and arrived at your final diagnosis...

Thanks again,
Robin

 
Old 06-09-2005, 11:15 AM   #10
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chester Springs, PA, USA
Posts: 1,674
Subs30 HB UserSubs30 HB User
Cool Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyblond
Hi Subs,

Was the experience at the U of P far different than what you had encountered with your previous health care providers? (ENT, etc.) I suppose that's a silly question - I would have to assume it would be. Just interested in what other testing they did, and how they further evaluated and arrived at your final diagnosis...

Thanks again,
Robin
Hi Robin

..."assume it would be"....

Yep---it sure was---prior to that---most of the stuff---seemed kind of ad hoc/piecemeal

---think the tests were just about all that are contained in the "sticky post" on Vestibular Testing---what differentiated--them---was the do that for a living and only that---nothing else---

if you look at the "Sticky Post"---you will see one on "Chronic Dizziness" that was written by the Director of the Univ of Penn's Balance Center

---in addition---it is a team of medical types they run you through, i.e., Neurologists, Nuero-oto-gists, Psychiatrists, VRT experts, etc....

---the last person you see is the Director who give you the "news"....


Last edited by Subs30; 06-09-2005 at 11:18 AM.

 
Old 06-09-2005, 01:08 PM   #11
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: California
Posts: 290
dizzyblond HB User
Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Wow... that's impressive!!! Lucky you!!!!!!!!!!!

 
Old 06-09-2005, 02:17 PM   #12
Inactive
(male)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Chester Springs, PA, USA
Posts: 1,674
Subs30 HB UserSubs30 HB User
Cool Re: For those of you who wear bifocals, progressive glasses or monovision contacts....

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzyblond
Wow... that's impressive!!! Lucky you!!!!!!!!!!!
Hi Robin

Most of the Univ Balance Centers---Northwestern, Boston, John Hopkins, Penn, UCLA, etc...in the U.S. and L/L group in the UK, Prof (can't remember name--he is named in a "sticky post) in Australia, and a number of other locations---that---have an ongoing interest/expertise & research in this area

---use the team type approach---they believe---that it is just to complex a problem---for one medical specialty to resolve---it takes a team

If there was any luck---involved---it was--figured out

---that one MD on his/her own---was prob not going to solve it---just to much going on

---and that one of the best was located near(within 40mi)....


 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
do bifocal contacts work better than progressive glasses coniglj Eye & Vision 2 03-08-2009 11:44 AM
Bifocals question??? rainbowdawn Eye & Vision 5 10-21-2007 12:04 PM
Autistic daughter doesn't want to wear her glasses jsmegkat Autism Spectrum 5 10-02-2006 08:44 PM
Are you a glasses wearer or contacts? Which do you prefer and why? myope33 Eye & Vision 8 09-02-2005 11:21 PM
LASIK 3days ago but needing glasses for computer liem123 Lasik Eye Surgery 5 08-22-2005 10:57 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:32 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!