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Old 03-26-2008, 11:35 AM   #1
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Hi, I think I have BPPV

Hi, I'm a 54-year-old mother of an 11 year old son, and live in Wyoming in a town big enough to have a pretty good hospital. I've always been disgustingly healthy and don't even have a regular doctor. But, as a self-employed computer consultant, I am thrilled to report that I finally have decent health insurance. Thank goodness.

3 weeks ago I thought I had a stomach bug, but I mentioned the accompanying strange dizziness to a friend who explained to me that she had come down with something called BPPV last fall. So after some googling I betook myself to the hospital via a friend, whose car I miraculously managed to not throw up in. The ER folks seemed familiar with the concept of BPPV, though nobody attempted the Dix-Hallpike test; they did check my eyes a couple times but by then I was on some pretty good IV drugs that suppressed the dizziness, so that might explain why they saw no nystagmus.

Anyway, they stuck me in the ICU overnight (not because I was dying, but they explained they have better monitoring there) and I got blood tests, CT scan of head, MRI of head, and EKG, all normal. I had a very nice internist who convinced the only neurologist, who visits from Salt Lake once a month, to squeeze me in on his next visit on 4/1 (an auspicious date?) All the while I kept saying I think I have BPPV, but by this time the acute vertigo had subsided, though I kept getting pulled to the left when I walked; the doctor got more interested in this left-hand tremor thing and some abnormal leg and arm reflexes that I've had for a couple of years. She thinks they're related. I am unsure, but who am I?

I went home the next day and still felt slightly dizzy for a couple of days, so I did more research and self-administered the Dix-Hallpike; my left ear was a definite positive. So I did the Epley for that side and darned if the next day I didn't feel good as new. Which might have happened regardless. Anyway I got a neck MRI preparatory for my neuro appt next week. Still felt great.

Then two days ago, the dizziness and queasiness returned after I rolled over suddenly (left to right) in bed. I came home from work and took a Valium (left over from the hospital adventure) and slept about 20 hours. Yesterday morning I tested myself again, got positive spin on left ear, did Epley again, and a couple hours later felt much better. I spent all afternoon reading about BPPV and found a great article by Dr. Epley and Dr. Li that explained the Epley in better detail.

So this morning I'm dizzy again, and did the (hopefully more-correct) Epley, though the first time I had to take a break to throw up, so it took two tries.

It appears from a lot of your posts that diagnosis is a big problem, though I'm (no offense meant) hoping I don't have the complications and severity that so many of you deal with so heroically on a daily, long-term basis. I was slightly frustrated that none of the medical folks I've seen yet have known enough to try a Dix-Hallpike test--or am I being overly critical? There is one doc in town who I heard is familiar with it, but when his office responded to my message I felt like he was blowing me off--they just said to call the internist I saw at the hospital.

Thanks for your patience with this long post. I would love to find out:

--How long does it take to feel better after a successful Epley? Do many people have success with self-administered Epley? (The nearest real expert for this stuff is apparently in Bozeman, where my friend went.)

--Is it common to get chills for several hours if you've gotten dizzy enough to throw up?

--What are good things to ask a neurologist? Do they tend to get annoyed at any mention of the word "internet"? (I don't know if this guy specializes in inner ear, but he's in charge of the neurological department at the University of Utah, and is reputed to be hot stuff. Besides, I *am* interested in pursuing the tremor thing too.)

--It appears Valium is a bad idea if you're trying to reprogram your CNS balance center, but does it do any harm for somebody in my situation? Because it sure helps with the nausea.

Thanks for any advice and enlightenment. And thanks for all the examples of bravery and positive attitude I read in this forum.

[p.s. I just found "Self-treatment of BPPV - Modified Epley Procedure (MEP) - A Radtke et al" in the sticky for this forum, but would still welcome any feedback. Thanks!]

Last edited by cavenewt; 03-26-2008 at 07:59 PM. Reason: removed reference to an outside web site

 
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Old 03-26-2008, 01:29 PM   #2
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Sorry to hear you're going through this like the rest of us.
I'm perusing messages here to see if I missed anything that could help. I came across yours and wanted to reply.

How close are you to Denver? There is a vestibular PT that I see who you might want to talk to or ask if she knows anyone in your area. I wonder if I can recommend people on this site???

The PT and my ENT "think" I have BPPV. I've had it for years,but it was always short-term and didn't know what it was until this year when one bout after another has put my life in limbo for many months. I've tried many manuevers at home and with the PT, only to find it goes away until I move to the left side, then it all comes back again.

To respond to some of your questions:
It is normal to have chills, I've been told that's your nervous system responding. It's sort of a shock response, so you get the chills, you're shakey, cold, hands tingle, chest pressure. It's an anxiety response.

Because you're having left side limb issues, it's good you're seeing a neurologist to rule out anything worrying. They'll probably want to see the MRI and other scans you've had. I would ask if they've ruled out any neuro problems to recommend a good ENT for you as well as vestibular therapist.

What an ENT will try and find out is if it's postional, do you have nystagmus (flickering eye movement). If you do, it could be BPPV.

If you're concerned about using Valium, you could try Meclyzine, which is what ENT's suggest to use. It's an over the counter med that's for motion sickness. It'll help with nausea and make you so tired you won't care if you're dizzy.

Good luck. I hope you find a sound and quick solution, please do share if you do. I'm prepared to drive to WY if I have to!

 
Old 03-26-2008, 08:28 PM   #3
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Hi snh39

Thanks for your reply. I'm looking forward to the neurologist appt for a variety of reasons.

About nystagmus: when you see the room spinning (actually, for me, it rotates about 45 degrees counter-clockwise then repeats), I can't help thinking that I'm sort of seeing the nystagmus from the inside. I know I need a trained person to observe it, but it sure fits the description of a positive Dix-Hallpike when I lay back with my head tilted down and to the left, and after about 17 seconds (I timed it) the room starts to spin. It keeps that up for about 60 seconds. Throw up, rinse, repeat.

As for treatment, my friend tried a local doc, then somebody in Idaho Falls, then she found this woman in Bozeman (250 miles away) who is experienced and has the proper equipment and apparently fixed her completely with one treatment (at least she's had no recurrence, and she was diagnosed with BPPV in both ears.) When she first told me about it I thought she went to an awful lot of trouble, but it's looking more and more attractive to me. Denver is twice as far away. I'm sure there are good people in Salt Lake, too.

I got the MRIs as preparation for the neurologist. Most of my brain is "unremarkable" (a compliment, in this case) except for "...vascular loops which are rather prominent entering both internal auditory canals. These findings can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. However, these also can be asymptomatic."

I never realized it but I have had tinnitus for a long time. I thought that whining staticky noise was normal, and it has never bothered me, but all this reading recently prompted me to look that up too, and darned if I don't have tinnitus. I figure it's from long-term exposure to moderate noise (I spent twenty years as a custom printer in a photo lab working next to a print processing machine, not loud, but constant noise.)

Can tinnitus be a cause of BPPV? Stay tuned for next week's exciting episode!

 
Old 03-26-2008, 09:53 PM   #4
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Quote:
Originally Posted by cavenewt View Post
Hi snh39

Thanks for your reply. I'm looking forward to the neurologist appt for a variety of reasons.

About nystagmus: when you see the room spinning (actually, for me, it rotates about 45 degrees counter-clockwise then repeats), I can't help thinking that I'm sort of seeing the nystagmus from the inside. I know I need a trained person to observe it, but it sure fits the description of a positive Dix-Hallpike when I lay back with my head tilted down and to the left, and after about 17 seconds (I timed it) the room starts to spin. It keeps that up for about 60 seconds. Throw up, rinse, repeat.

As for treatment, my friend tried a local doc, then somebody in Idaho Falls, then she found this woman in Bozeman (250 miles away) who is experienced and has the proper equipment and apparently fixed her completely with one treatment (at least she's had no recurrence, and she was diagnosed with BPPV in both ears.) When she first told me about it I thought she went to an awful lot of trouble, but it's looking more and more attractive to me. Denver is twice as far away. I'm sure there are good people in Salt Lake, too.

I got the MRIs as preparation for the neurologist. Most of my brain is "unremarkable" (a compliment, in this case) except for "...vascular loops which are rather prominent entering both internal auditory canals. These findings can be associated with tinnitus and vertigo. However, these also can be asymptomatic."

I never realized it but I have had tinnitus for a long time. I thought that whining staticky noise was normal, and it has never bothered me, but all this reading recently prompted me to look that up too, and darned if I don't have tinnitus. I figure it's from long-term exposure to moderate noise (I spent twenty years as a custom printer in a photo lab working next to a print processing machine, not loud, but constant noise.)

Can tinnitus be a cause of BPPV? Stay tuned for next week's exciting episode!

Tinnitus is a symptom of BPPV or another problem, not the other way around. Tinnitus isn't actually a medical problem, it's because of something like ear pressure, or in my case TMJ, that creates the ringing in your ears. It's important too to know what exactly it sounds like. And if it changes tune depending on which way you turn (or put pressure on it by the down side ear when you lay to one side). That could mean for example, that you have fluid in your ear. Mine sounds tinny, or like computer or tv static to a clash of high pitched sounds all at once. When I move my head to one side it can go to a high pitched sound, like the ones they do in a hearing test.

I'd say you have BPPV just from what you've said, because they're the same symptoms I have...room spins, counter clockwise (I have had it spin the other direction, as well as up and down...this means that the crystals could be moving into the posterior canal, usually counter clockwise means it's in the horizontal canal...I believe that's correct). It's a horrible feeling. It feels like something electric or a stroke or something.

I've learned alot from the PT I've been seeing. It keeps coming back though! Very frusterating. I had such nice peace from it a week ago and now it's back.

I'd be interested to hear more about the doc in Bozeman and what kind of doctor this person is. Fixed after one appointment! I've been through nine. Nine times of about 5 or 6 Dix-Hallpike or other manuevers. Augh.

I hope you're friend doesn't have it return. It can. I hope for her sake it doesn't of course, but she shouldn't get too upset if it does. I've been told the average is about 4 times until it goes away. Not my luck unfortunately but I think I have something added that they haven't found.

Take care, keep us all posted! - - snh39

 
Old 03-27-2008, 07:52 AM   #5
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Quote:
Originally Posted by snh39 View Post

I'd be interested to hear more about the doc in Bozeman and what kind of doctor this person is. Fixed after one appointment! I've been through nine. Nine times of about 5 or 6 Dix-Hallpike or other manuevers. Augh.

I hope you're friend doesn't have it return. It can. I hope for her sake it doesn't of course, but she shouldn't get too upset if it does. I've been told the average is about 4 times until it goes away. Not my luck unfortunately but I think I have something added that they haven't found.

Take care, keep us all posted! - - snh39
My tinnitus never changes, it's just more noticeable in quiet surroundings. It sounds like high-pitched TV static. Funnily, it's the same sound I used to notice as a teenager whenever I walked past a neighbor's house that had a big TV antenna. Maybe I'm just picking up the massive increase in electromagnetic waves that are around these days

The PT my friend saw is Nancy Astrup in Bozeman, Montana. (I checked the forum's posting policy and that's all I'm allowed to say.) I did see her listed on a vestibular resource list in my wanderings over the last few days.

 
Old 03-27-2008, 01:32 PM   #6
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Quote:
Originally Posted by cavenewt View Post
My tinnitus never changes, it's just more noticeable in quiet surroundings. It sounds like high-pitched TV static. Funnily, it's the same sound I used to notice as a teenager whenever I walked past a neighbor's house that had a big TV antenna. Maybe I'm just picking up the massive increase in electromagnetic waves that are around these days

The PT my friend saw is Nancy Astrup in Bozeman, Montana. (I checked the forum's posting policy and that's all I'm allowed to say.) I did see her listed on a vestibular resource list in my wanderings over the last few days.
Thanks for the info. I'll check it out. Good luck with your rehabilitation.
-- snh39

 
Old 04-10-2008, 12:45 PM   #7
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Hello BPPVers!
I'm experiencing much of what all you are describing - albeit much more mildly, and I was actually diagnosed with BPPV several weeks ago. To rule out anything in the way of clot, tumor, etc. I underwent an MRI/MRA on just the neck and head - it came up negative, a good thing obviously. But at that time I still was experiencing the spinning and was basically walking around all day every day in a fog, nauseous, etc.
My Internist doc recommended I try the Epley Maneuver on my own as kind of a home-treatment, and I gotta say it worked great! Problem with this BPPV thing is that the maneuver seems to fix it for a short period of time, after which it returns. What's been happening to me - is that I'll go a couple of days feeling great with no symptoms whatsoever. So I'll try to sleep normally with one pillow, on my side, the whole thing, thinking that it's gone. Apparently this is a really bad idea, because after a couple of nights of this, I'll wake up at 3 am and feel like h*ll again. This pattern just repeated itself for the second time last night. I think lack of sleep exacerbates things also, because I've been sleeping really poorly since the first onset of this five weeks ago. I've never slept on my back my whole life, so trying to change that at 40 yrs old ain't happening.
Anyway, my next step in the diagnosis was to go to the best ENT guy in Dallas. After a battery of tests that verified my nystagmus, and checked my hearing and fluid in my ears, the doc reported the results to me as BPPV indeed. This was actually good news to me, since anything neurological causing it... well, you know.
Not sure if any of what I've said has contributed anything additional to this board, but I thought I'd chime in with a little of what my experience has been with it.

 
Old 04-10-2008, 01:27 PM   #8
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

gdb4 - let us know how you do with the home treatment. my struggling with this has been ongoing because when i think it seems to clear up or subside (the spinning, not the dysequilibrium) it comes back again when i lay or put weight on my left side.

my ent said there are the cases in which it will continue to return, it just means you need to go through more therapy until it finally goes away.

the more it's allowed to settle in one place, the longer it stays. i'm wondering if i need to just hit the PT every day. it'll make me sick but it seems when i don't use my left side, it will settle and it makes it more difficult to clear the next time.

 
Old 04-11-2008, 10:27 AM   #9
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

That's something I'm trying to figure out as well - how often to do the exercises. In my case, I've been doing the Epley Maneuver only after a day when I'm feeling bad - which is what I thought I was supposed to do. But it seems every source says something different. My ENT says to do each part of the maneuver for 2 minutes, and to do the whole procedure once, and then for 48 hours keep the head from looking up and down, and avoid bending at the waist, etc. etc. Just try doing that for 48 hours; it's next to impossible. Other sources say to wait 30 seconds (or until the spinning stops) after each part of the Maneuver, and then repeat the whole procedure 3x in the same sitting. So I still don't know what's right, because when it has worked, it always seems to return after a couple of days. The other thing that has be a little puzzled is that even though I can be feeling nausea during the day, doing the Epley Maneuver that evening will not trigger any vertigo spinning. Such was the case last night where I did the full Epley Maneuver, and today I'm feeling worse than I did before I did it - but I never spun during the exercise. Any help anyone has, or anything that's worked for you, I'd love to hear about it. Thanks!

 
Old 04-11-2008, 10:39 AM   #10
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

I feel for you all that have BPPV recurring. Mine went away in a few weeks of nightly Epleys, although I suspect I ceased having nystagamus after my first one or two MEPs. I still had dizziness that made me think I still had BPPV, but I could no longer trigger nausea or rotational vertigo, even though it felt like attacks were imminent. I still have dizziness due to what I think is a long-term PLF.

Though this is no comfort, from a study I read, the large majority of people have BPPV resolved in about a week of MEPs, usually with no special instructions to avoid postures or sleep in a chair, etc. I was amazed at how easy it is to diagnose and treat BPPV (usually with 1-3 daily MEPs and no followup like sleeping in a chair). Why this isn't more widely known is beyond me - but hopefully people will increasingly stumble upon the answers on our great InterWeb.

As much as I appreciate doctors, specialists, and car mechanics, they only have so much knowledge, time, and motivation to truly understand and fix a stranger's problems.

Not knowing anyone's specifics, I would encourage most people with vertigo to:

1) confirm if it's BPPV (Dix Halpike, looking up, rolling, etc.).
2) if so, book time off to do MEPs and deal with the nausea, etc. they will cause (but first read up on it and don't do them too quickly!)
3) don't treat with any drugs but do seek out dizzy postures so you can de-compensate asap.
4) continue MEPs as a preventative measure and/or if you feel it still helps
5) try and figure out why you got BPPV (e.g. too much dietary salt, low electrolytes, head injury, etc)
6) if you are STILL concerned, now is the time for more docs, VRT, tests, MRI, drugs, etc.

Last edited by Imbo; 04-11-2008 at 10:50 AM.

 
Old 04-11-2008, 12:34 PM   #11
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Imbo,
Your post is the first I've read of too much dietary salt being a cause of BPPV. If this indeed is the case, then I can tell you right now that it's the probable cause of mine. Possibly coincidental - but not to me - two weeks before my first attack of vertigo, my doc put me on lisinopril for high blood pressure (which I quit taking after my first spinning episode). I'm a salty snacks person, which I'm sure caused my high bp. I had no trauma or anything else that caused it - the vertigo just happened out of the blue. All the other things have been ruled out as far as tumors (had an mri/mra), stroke, etc. are concerned. And my ENT diagnosed it as BPPV after hearing, fluid, and nystagmus tests.
When you say do daily MEPs, what exactly does this mean? Once a day? Three times a day? I'm having trouble finding out if it's 3x/day, is it three times in the same sitting, or three separate times during a day...? Whatever the case may be, that's my next plan of attack - daily MEPs. Thanks!

 
Old 04-13-2008, 07:59 PM   #12
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

@gdb4,

Sorry, I didn't mean to suggest salt causes BPPV - I was just suggesting trying to find out what triggered it. I suppose a lot of people will never know why they got/get it, unless they had a head injury or something obvious. Avoiding high-salt diets is often suggested for people with Meniere's/hydrops and many people with BPPV have some of the same issues.

I only know two people who have had BPPV (me being one of them) and we both were salty snack people. On advice of a naturopathic consultation, I started taking high-potency mineral supplements and my salt craving disappeared almost immediately and I haven't had BPPV since then (a few months ago), but I don't know for sure if the two are related.

I don't know whether bp drugs would precipitate BPPV, but it wouldn't surprise me as mine would seem to get triggered with anti-inflammatories and somewhat relieved with caffeine, both of which would be effecting blood vessels, I think.

As for the MEPs, I *personally* suspect people get way too concerned about how often, whether a "specialist" does them or uses expensive equipment, and whether you need to sleep sitting up or avoid specific postures. The largest studies I've seen suggest that success usually comes fairly easy for most people without any special instructions like sleeping in a chair. My gut feel is it mostly doesn't matter. I can't imagine doing more than 1-3 sets of Epley's once a day at bedtime for more than a few days will have much therapeutic effect. The particles are either going to settle back into the right places in a few days or not. In my case, the anti-inflammatory kept BPPV coming back, but it only took a few times for me to realize this. If you still have BPPV, I don't think more MEPs or tweaking your technique will help things as it is probably another canal or bone that is affected. I think waiting 30 secs. in a position after spinning stops is great advice. My first few times, spinning didn't stop for 2 mins. (supposedly very rare), but I kept going and was sick for 48 hours. Waiting longer in a position cannot hurt but probably won't help.

Have you considered your BPPV might be resolved without you knowing it due to dizziness (not positional vertigo) caused by inner ear de-compensating or other issues? After I got my canaliths repositioned, I felt dizzy for about a month until I found out on these boards that by not looking up, around, rolling over, etc. I was probably preventing my inner ear from re-compensating. Then I started challenging my dizziness (rowing machines, etc) and rather than get vertigo again, things got better in a few days.

So I'd either get more nystagamus tests or try and reproduce the positional vertigo to see if really is still an issue. I still get the odd queasiness from looking up suddenly (I have some other balance issues in addition to past bouts of BPPV) but I no longer get the room spinning or vomiting. If the positional vertigo doesn't go away with MEPs, perhaps you are doing them wrong in which case you probably need a specialist to show you again, but more likely it is another form of BPPV. I haven't seen any significant experiments that show any benefits of not looking up, bending over, sleeping upright, etc. There are some that show Epley is slightly more effective than similar techniques, and repeated home exercises are more effective than single doctor treatments, but that's about all I've seen.

 
Old 04-13-2008, 11:55 PM   #13
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

gdb4 -
It's important to have a PT take you through the manuevers and which ones to do when and how often. The thing is, the crystals can end up in multiple canals and you won't be able to tell which one they're in whereas a PT can by which direction your eyes are moving and at which side you turn, etc.

The time inbetween rolls to the next side really doesn't matter as much. The main thing is that you don't move until the spinning has stopped completely before you go on to the next step.

If you do too many in one day or at one sitting you'll know, because you'll want to throw up. Sometimes doing them can make other dizzy issues worse like dysequilibrium, nausea. It just means you're over doing it and to quit and pick it up the next day.

But doing these at home too is important because you need to keep the crystals from settling into the wrong place where they continue to give you trouble. And it is best to re-calibrate or get used to using the positions again, that make you dizzy. If you don't the stuff will go back into the place it shouldn't plus you'll delay recovering those "bad" positions.

The information referring to "sleep at an angle or stay upright so things can settle" means that after you've done Epley's, Dx, etc. it's good to let it settle for a few days (including sleeping more upright). Then move to those sides that usually make you have spins so that you can see if the problem still exists.

The time between is what you'd probably want to confirm with a PT. I don't recall if it's one day, three days of settling, or what. If you don't let it settle for a bit, you stand the chance of the crystals moving back into the wrong place again by tipping your head forward or back.

If you let it settle too long, however, like a week, any remaining crystals left in the wrong place (stuff that still needs to be cleared) will be that much more difficult to clear the next time.

With some people this stuff clears after some PT visits and some home manuevers. Other people, it takes longer or there's other ear issues playing into it that keeps it from clearing. Also, people could still have residual problems but they may not be as sensitive to it, so they don't feel dizzy. Maybe they just have less debris in the inner ear to clear, whereas you (or me for that matter) need more time, more treatments in PT and it will take longer due to having more debris or being more sensitive to recalibration.

You can be downright dizzy even without any evidence of nystagmus.
Other issues can play into this as well; neck or jaw problems like TMJ, middle ear, ear pressure issues, even allergies, other meds, etc.

Once you know you have BPPV though, trying to recover from it is mostly based on MEP's, and time really, I think. Maybe if you don't have much eye movement during a spin, it could be time to take a break from the manuevers, and just concentrate on recalibrating and resting. Because if the crystals have cleared, and you continue to do MEP's, you're not giving your body a break from it and it will continue to feel residual dizziness.

I wish we were all on conference speaker phone, so we could converse over all the details. Everyone's experience has similarities, yet there are so many variations on what we've gone through, what works, what didn't and why.

Anyway, I was reading this thread and thought I'd put my two sense in. It helps me also to respond so that I can think more clearly about what has worked for me and what hasn't.

Take care, Keep trying, eventually something will break for you.

snh39

 
Old 04-14-2008, 08:39 AM   #14
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

Hi, time for me to chime in again, now that I have seen a, what should I call her, a vestibular specialist.

To recap briefly, my first attack was March 6, bad enough that they stuck me in the ICU for a night. Got better in a few days (possibly due to a self-administered D-H and Epley, since nobody at the hospital had done it.) Two weeks later it recurred, not bad enough to throw up, but debilitating.

Anyway a week ago I traveled 200 miles to Bozeman to see a Nancy Astrup. She had helped a friend last fall with debris in both ears. She looked at me, did the video-eye thing, moved me around, and diagnosed not canaliths but cupoliths--the debris is attached to the cupola, not floating around loose in the canal. One indication of this was in the D-H position the vertigo did not fatigue but kept going and going and going...like the Energizer bunny. And she could tell from the nystagmus which canal was affected.

She was wonderfully relaxed in the sense that she didn't rush us out of there (my spouse-equivalent came along) but was happy to chat and answer all the questions we could think of. Turns out the Epley is not the right maneuver for cupoliths but the Semont is, and she went over that with me a few times so I could do it at home if needed. I asked if maybe I had originally had both canaliths and cupoliths, and if that might explain the possible success of the earlier Epleys; instead of dismissing this, she said it's really rare but she didn't see any argument against it.

She also said that most doctors are woefully unaware of the details of BPPV and told the story of a woman who had had a head injury, and after recovering complained to her doctors of dizziness. For years. They kept telling her it was just a result of her injury and to get used to it. After something like two decades, she saw a vestibular specialist, who diagnosed BPPV and fixed it with one treatment.

Anyway, I am feeling much more normal. Have been down in the Utah desert hiking and camping for a few days and aside from not trusting my balance in exposed situations (more mental than physical, I'm sure!) I have not felt any dizziness at all.

As an aside, almost everybody I mention this to says "Oh, I have that" or they know somebody who does. Amazing that I managed to never hear of something so widespread, until it happened to me!

I think the advice to have a knowledgeable specialist diagnose your specific case is well-taken, otherwise you might be doing the wrong maneuver and not helping yourself at all.

 
Old 04-14-2008, 10:11 AM   #15
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Re: Hi, I think I have BPPV

I guess it's possible that I should take a break from trying the MEPs since I've not experience any spinning from doing them in over a week now. The only residual effect I'm feeling is that I'm still feeling some nausea during the day, and a bit of anxiety. I assumed this was being caused by debris remnants that aren't significant enough to trigger vertigo, but still enough to cause a bit of motion sickness. I don't even know if that's possible; maybe I have something else going on besides bppv.

 
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