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Old 12-02-2011, 08:36 AM   #1
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bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

Hi everyone,

I'm a 24 year old who has had bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years. They don't really have any idea what caused it. Perhaps a virus, combination of medications or perhaps auto-immune disorder. Anyhow, it has been the the hardest 4 years of my life.

I just got back from a day of testing in Southern Ontario Canada and was told that my left year is a complete loss, no response from calorics or anything. They say my right ear has maybe 10-15% left in it.

I haven't really given much attention to VRT but I guess it's about time I start. I think I will simply cover my eyes with a shirt or something and practice spending time walking in a dark room so I can master my priproceptive feedback.

The strangest thing is that even with 10% left only in one ear, I still get severe vertigo spells rather often. How strange! It is horrible.

Fellow Canadians, where have you been diagnosed in Canada? Whenever they tell me I have bilateral loss they seem to make it seem like I'm the only one in Canada.

Last edited by yokid; 12-02-2011 at 08:38 AM.

 
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Old 12-02-2011, 09:21 AM   #2
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Re: What treatments help you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by yokid View Post
Hi everyone,

I'm a 24 year old who has had bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years. They don't really have any idea what caused it. Perhaps a virus, combination of medications or perhaps auto-immune disorder. Anyhow, it has been the the hardest 4 years of my life.

I just got back from a day of testing in Southern Ontario Canada and was told that my left year is a complete loss, no response from calorics or anything. They say my right ear has maybe 10-15% left in it.

I haven't really given much attention to VRT but I guess it's about time I start. I think I will simply cover my eyes with a shirt or something and practice spending time walking in a dark room so I can master my priproceptive feedback.

The strangest thing is that even with 10% left only in one ear, I still get severe vertigo spells rather often. How strange! It is horrible.

Fellow Canadians, where have you been diagnosed in Canada? Whenever they tell me I have bilateral loss they seem to make it seem like I'm the only one in Canada.
Dear Yokid,

So sorry to hear you are going through such a hard time.

My situation is very similar to yours. My last caloric tests showed a complete loss on my left year and about 30% left on my right one (just like with you, the cause is unknown). I have done different types of VRT and it did help, unfortunately only temporarly... I have had the spinning vertigo sensation a few times for the past few years, but only rarely. However, for some strange reason this week, I have had it twice and it is simply horrible! I actually have a very good physical balance (basically, no one could tell I am soooo dizzy inside my head) but these episodes are definitely different and I just feel like I am about to fall over at any moment..

Are you still able to work? Did your specialists recommend any form of VRT? I definitely think you should give it a try, I think if anything will help our condition is to train your brain to compensate for the vestibular loss.

I hope you can find some help in Canada and please feel free to ask any questions about my experience with BVL.

All the best.

 
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Old 12-02-2011, 11:44 AM   #3
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Re: What treatments help you?

dizzym2010, The therapist suggested I do gaze exercises to work on my oscillopsia and also some balance excersizes with my eyes closed (standing on one foot or in tandem), walking and looking left to right, up and down etc.

Luckily I am an entrepreneur so I don't have a boss to answer to. I work at a computer so it doesn't require good balance which is a blessing. I've learned to tough out most episodes of vertigo. In the early days 4 years ago I was missing quite a bit of work because I was so scared and dizzy. I manage it all a lot better now emotionally. I just accept that some days will be better than others and if I can't do something today, I will be able to have a chance to do it tomorrow. However, I still get vertigo once every few days. I feel generally off balance, but I try to stay in shape by lifting weights and using a chin up bar. I used to love running on the treadmill but my oscillopsia has made that too hard for me now days.

Can I ask you how old you are and how long it has affected you? Do you foresee your right ear getting worse or is your situation stable?

 
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Old 12-04-2011, 06:53 AM   #4
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Re: What treatments help you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by yokid View Post
dizzym2010, The therapist suggested I do gaze exercises to work on my oscillopsia and also some balance excersizes with my eyes closed (standing on one foot or in tandem), walking and looking left to right, up and down etc.

Luckily I am an entrepreneur so I don't have a boss to answer to. I work at a computer so it doesn't require good balance which is a blessing. I've learned to tough out most episodes of vertigo. In the early days 4 years ago I was missing quite a bit of work because I was so scared and dizzy. I manage it all a lot better now emotionally. I just accept that some days will be better than others and if I can't do something today, I will be able to have a chance to do it tomorrow. However, I still get vertigo once every few days. I feel generally off balance, but I try to stay in shape by lifting weights and using a chin up bar. I used to love running on the treadmill but my oscillopsia has made that too hard for me now days.

Can I ask you how old you are and how long it has affected you? Do you foresee your right ear getting worse or is your situation stable?
Have you started with the VTR exercices? And if so, do they help? I tried those ones before for a while, but unfortunately they did not help me. But I heard of people who did see some improvements, so I hope they work for you too.
I am 37 years old and have been suffering from BVL for about 11 years. It started very "violently", with a strong dizziness/vertigo episode and then gradually became a permanent feeling of unsteadiness, that worsens with particular triggers (such as bright lights, head/eye movent). However, after I was diagnosed and did some VRT (called optokinetic stimulation) I was dizzy free for years. Then I had the same "episode" and consequent symptoms and again, after half a year of VRT I was "normal" again for another 6 years. Then, about 2 years ago, I had the same spinning episode and since then, all the other symptoms have remained and nothing seems to help. I do have "good" days, or even "good weeks", but sooner or later I relapse again. About a year ago I repeated all the balance tests they showed about 65% loss on my left ear and 70% loss on the right one. Then 6 months later, I repeated the tests and it showed I had lost my left side completely and the same 65% loss on the right remained. So, in my case, my BVL is not stable and I think it could be at least one of the reasons why I am still having complaints as my brain is not able to compensate with all the changes..And is your situation stable?
My job also envolves the use of a computer all the time, but I actually had to quit my job because the computer light + head/eye movement that was just too much to cope with after a while: I get brainfog and I become dizzier when I move my eyes away from the computer or when I need to get up...I am suprised to hear that working in front of a computer for long hours does not affect you..or do you need to take breaks?
I am lucky that my gait is actually very good. I danced classical ballet for many years and practiced yoga, so I think that has actually helped me to keep a normal balance/posture (some people with BVL have to use a cane, for example). However, the "head" sensations are very strong and that makes any walking/movement/concentration very difficult for me at times. Do you have any postural issues? How would you describe the visual issues/dizziness you have?

 
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Old 12-04-2011, 10:30 AM   #5
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Re: What treatments help you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzym2010 View Post
Have you started with the VTR exercices? And if so, do they help? I tried those ones before for a while, but unfortunately they did not help me. But I heard of people who did see some improvements, so I hope they work for you too.
I am 37 years old and have been suffering from BVL for about 11 years. It started very "violently", with a strong dizziness/vertigo episode and then gradually became a permanent feeling of unsteadiness, that worsens with particular triggers (such as bright lights, head/eye movent). However, after I was diagnosed and did some VRT (called optokinetic stimulation) I was dizzy free for years. Then I had the same "episode" and consequent symptoms and again, after half a year of VRT I was "normal" again for another 6 years. Then, about 2 years ago, I had the same spinning episode and since then, all the other symptoms have remained and nothing seems to help. I do have "good" days, or even "good weeks", but sooner or later I relapse again. About a year ago I repeated all the balance tests they showed about 65% loss on my left ear and 70% loss on the right one. Then 6 months later, I repeated the tests and it showed I had lost my left side completely and the same 65% loss on the right remained. So, in my case, my BVL is not stable and I think it could be at least one of the reasons why I am still having complaints as my brain is not able to compensate with all the changes..And is your situation stable?
My job also envolves the use of a computer all the time, but I actually had to quit my job because the computer light + head/eye movement that was just too much to cope with after a while: I get brainfog and I become dizzier when I move my eyes away from the computer or when I need to get up...I am suprised to hear that working in front of a computer for long hours does not affect you..or do you need to take breaks?
I am lucky that my gait is actually very good. I danced classical ballet for many years and practiced yoga, so I think that has actually helped me to keep a normal balance/posture (some people with BVL have to use a cane, for example). However, the "head" sensations are very strong and that makes any walking/movement/concentration very difficult for me at times. Do you have any postural issues? How would you describe the visual issues/dizziness you have?
I just got the sheets to follow for VRT so I will be starting them whenever I get some free time. I have tried some in the past and I found that all the back and forth head motions actually made me feel dizzier. I live in a small town so there aren't any physical therapists to help me with the process. I'll have to do it myself.

In the early days I actually thought that computer use was the culprit of my vertigo episodes. Probably because I was using the computer most of the time and the first episodes I had happened while I was at the computer. I sometimes have these weird sensations that I suddenly feel very dizzy while at the computer so I'll get up and walk around and the oscillopscia is back with a vengeance. Does it have an effect? My doctors I have said no. They don't know what causes it. So, I don't necessarily believe them either.

My BVL is not stable at all. I still get very scary and severe vertigo episodes every month or so that last about 10 min. They come out of nowhere. I'll be doing something and then all of a sudden everything starts spinning so incredibly fast that I have to just stand there and brace for it. When they happen I usually start to panic and think I have something more serious than just BVL. It literally feels like I'm having a stroke. It feels like someone is just crossing live wires deep in my brain.

I must have some sort of autoimmune disorder because literally since that first episode, every day has been a traumatic experience of dizziness and vertigo. I went from being an in shape normal 20 year old to disabled and anxious in a matter of seconds. My whole life changed in those mere minutes. Usually viruses attack and then are done after a short while but I deteriorated slowly over 4 years.

If it means that I no longer have vertigo if my right ear dies, then I'm probably just waiting for that. I'd rather be stable and off then off and spinning.

Do you have any hearing loss? I have good hearing in both my ears.

I'm scared for the future because if I fall now, I could easily heal and probably soften the fall because I am still fairly young and in shape. I am scared for the future though when I am older and a falls become more dangerous.

Last edited by yokid; 12-04-2011 at 10:34 AM.

 
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Old 12-05-2011, 08:49 AM   #6
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Re: What treatments help you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by yokid View Post
I just got the sheets to follow for VRT so I will be starting them whenever I get some free time. I have tried some in the past and I found that all the back and forth head motions actually made me feel dizzier. I live in a small town so there aren't any physical therapists to help me with the process. I'll have to do it myself.

In the early days I actually thought that computer use was the culprit of my vertigo episodes. Probably because I was using the computer most of the time and the first episodes I had happened while I was at the computer. I sometimes have these weird sensations that I suddenly feel very dizzy while at the computer so I'll get up and walk around and the oscillopscia is back with a vengeance. Does it have an effect? My doctors I have said no. They don't know what causes it. So, I don't necessarily believe them either.

My BVL is not stable at all. I still get very scary and severe vertigo episodes every month or so that last about 10 min. They come out of nowhere. I'll be doing something and then all of a sudden everything starts spinning so incredibly fast that I have to just stand there and brace for it. When they happen I usually start to panic and think I have something more serious than just BVL. It literally feels like I'm having a stroke. It feels like someone is just crossing live wires deep in my brain.

I must have some sort of autoimmune disorder because literally since that first episode, every day has been a traumatic experience of dizziness and vertigo. I went from being an in shape normal 20 year old to disabled and anxious in a matter of seconds. My whole life changed in those mere minutes. Usually viruses attack and then are done after a short while but I deteriorated slowly over 4 years.

If it means that I no longer have vertigo if my right ear dies, then I'm probably just waiting for that. I'd rather be stable and off then off and spinning.

Do you have any hearing loss? I have good hearing in both my ears.

I'm scared for the future because if I fall now, I could easily heal and probably soften the fall because I am still fairly young and in shape. I am scared for the future though when I am older and a falls become more dangerous.
Good luck with the VRT exercices, I do hope that they do help you. In theory the exercices are actually meant to make you dizzier first and then with time/practice you should feel better. Like I mentioned before, I tried them too for a while, but unfortunately they did not make any difference for me. The only ones that worked for me are called optokinetic stimulation (they gave me my life back in the past, although they don't seem to work anymore) Sometimes I think that happened because my BVL is not stable yet either. I know exactly the experience you describe when you get dizzy/vertigo all of the sudden. I have those episodes very rarely but the past week I had 2 and it was very scary, as I was out shopping and could hardly stand up. I have also developed severe anxiety since BVL and although I no longer have full panic attacks, I almost have them when that dizziness/vertigo comes out of nowhere.

The issues you have with the computer are very common with people with BVL and like I mentioned before, the reason why I had to quit my job. Sitting in front of the screen, focusing on the information/scrolling up and down, concentrating demands a lot from you/your brain, it is like an intensive VRT session, so don't be surprised that you get extremely dizzy if you are working for too long. I now force myself to take breaks every hour or so (take my eyes away from the screen/walk for a little while) and that helps. I also got some glasses with lenses with antireflective coating on both sides and in light shade of gray that also help a little.

Have you been tested for autoimmune disorders? I got blood tests done several times before (throughout the years) and they all came out fine, so the doctors just came to the conclusion that my BVL is idiopathic. Maybe you can ask your doctor to check for autoimmune disorders?

I really feel your frustration. I am from Europe (therefore my appologies that my level of English is not as good as a native speaker), moved to a new country a few years ago, got a great job, bought a house, had a very active social life and then bam...I feel like I lost most of my life and it has been really hard to cope with the "new me". But because I have been suffering with BVL for so long and actually had "normal" years in between, I do believe that this is a temporary situation and that eventually my brain will be able to compensate.
Also, you have to think that the fact that you are so young is actually an advantage as your brain can learn/adapt more easily, so I would not worry too much about it. Instead, I would take advantage of it.

My hearing is also perfect, usually people with BVL do not lose their hearing, that is related to another part of the ear.

There is another thread here in the Inner Ear Disorders Board called "Bilateral Hypofunction" that I have recently read/joined with 2 other members (Uga and Manybikes) that a have a lot of really useful information regarding their experience with BVL, especially from Manybikes, who has zero function on both ears and has now a very functional life. So, if you want, check it out.

 
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Old 12-16-2012, 09:42 PM   #7
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

yokid,

I've had a unilateral loss (complete) for about a year from a virus. Took me 5 months to drive again. I went hard with VRT with exercises I got from a Vancouver-based vestibular therapist and some from a Chicago therapist (who is awesome). At the 6 month mark, I started surfing again, and at the 7 month mark, I started playing hockey again (ya, I'm Canadian too). Still have symptoms, but I can feel that the brain is compensating.

Last edited by Administrator; 01-02-2013 at 01:48 PM.

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:25 AM   #8
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

Hi!


Well it has been over a year since that post. I am glad to see some people responded. It is so hard to find others with BVL so it's nice to hear from someone.

Well the last year has been better. Actually quite a bit better. My life has regained a sense of normalcy. It seems my right ear is so weak now that I get the vertigo episodes less often. Actually, It still comes back to haunt me every now and again but I have been able to go to the gym again a few times a week. I am so happy for that.

Although I still have oscillopsia when moving and if I shake my head from side to side I can't focus on anything, I am starting to notice it less and less. (Unless the day is particularly bad). After a few years I can't really remember what it's like not to live with this condition..

I gave up on VRT because I have nearly absolute BVL so I don't see much point. I can still ride my bike which is something I still enjoy.


How are you guys doing?

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:56 AM   #9
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

Hi

I've had a bilateral vestibular disorder since I was 22 (1999). I'm 35 and I STILL haven't received a firm diagnosis! However, signs point to something like "secondary endolymphatic hydrops" or "atypical Meniere's/Meniere's syndrome"...which are not really true diagnoses, or at least diagnoses that make doctors happy. Whatever, it's not my fault their objective testing isn't up to par. In any case, I regularly experience: mild tinnitus, aural fullness/pressure, hyperacusis, some rotatory vertigo, and a whole lot of non-rotatory vertigo/dysequilibrium/sensations of falling/swaying/bouncing/etc. But no hearing loss. My most recent VNG shows I have "bilateral vestibular hypofunction" (definitely much worse than the last one, ten years ago) and I've had at least one ECOG that shows endolymphatic hydrops. So yeah, I probably have something like Meniere's or some other vestibular disorder that doesn't quite fit all the stringent criteria for diagnosis.

The first few years of my disorder were awful and highly symptomatic. I sought out every treatment under the sun. I even moved from home in New York City to Portland, Oregon, just to be treated by the famous (now retired) Dr. Epley. He ended up treating me with intratympanic steroids in both ears, and while I can't say for sure that it was what helped...I did transition into several not-so-bad years following that treatment. The last couple of years have been rough again, now with occasional oscillopsia, which is no fun. I currently live in Washington State and am starting off with yet another otoneurologist (I've seen 7 or 8 over the years), and hopefully starting on more steroids delivered to the inner ear next year. Can't wait to see the bill for that treatment! Ugh.

I'm still working (as a librarian), but can't deny that it's been rough lately with all of the swimming/bobbing/bouncing dizziness. When I'm working at the computer I can cope fairly well, but when I have to be on my feet for presentations or trainings, or travel for work, that's when I really struggle. I'm sure some of the people I interact with think I'm just a cranky person, but the fact of the matter is I'm struggling with an invisible chronic illness & disability. (However, I can't deny I'm also naturally cranky ).

Yokid, it sounds like you've adapted pretty well to your vestibular loss and I agree with dizzym2010 that your youth probably helped with that. Early on I did VRT for several months, and was diligent about it, but never saw any positive effects--I think because my condition is constantly fluctuating and my ears seem to be on a steady decline. So I make sure I go for walks at least one, and sometimes as many as three times, a day (and I make a conscious effort to turn my head and look around a lot as I'm walking). Sometimes I go on hikes and use trekking poles, which are awesome. I have a wii fit with balance board, which is really great for balance training--I can now beat my wife in the downhill slalom any day of the week and she's got a healthy vestibular system. Also, I have a toddler at home to constantly chase around, so that constitutes vestibular training of a sort as well (and is freaking exhausting). Sometimes, when my symptoms seem somewhat stable, I go back and perform some of the basic VRT exercises I learned more than ten years ago (e.g., staring at a dot on the wall while moving my head in various planes; standing on one foot with eyes closed, etc.). Just for that reason alone I think anyone who's prescribed VRT should absolutely try it.

I've suffered a lot with this condition and in the early days it seemed like my life was pretty much over. I was in deep despair and depression for a long time. And yet somehow, life went on and there have been many wonderful things that happened to me. I'm not going to sugar-coat it: I'm still suffering now and know I will be for the foreseeable future. I still experience moments of despair...and if I just wait them out, they eventually pass. I may even be forced to go on disability at some point. If that happens, so be it; I'll work my way back to a situation that works for me. In the meantime, I'm just pursuing further treatment even if I'm skeptical it will make much of a difference. For me that means the intratympanic steroid thing, plus eating a low-salt diet and experimenting with removal of things like gluten and dairy from my diet (again, I'm skeptical these have any effect, but I do them anyway, because you've got to keep trying!).

I've also been following all of the ongoing efforts by various institutions to create a vestibular prosthesis/implant--in some places these are already being tested in humans; how cool is that?! And in ten or twenty years (or, who knows, maybe much less) we may have various stem cell or other biological therapies that can restore our inner ears. Stay strong my fellow bilateral sufferers!

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:48 PM   #10
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

Hey yokid,

Glad to hear things have been better over the past year. I love the word "normalcy". I keep using that word to describe my goals to people. Tough for them to understand.

My one-sided loss is 100%. The good news with that is it is 100% stable so I don't get any periods of vertigo.

I have the oscillopsia going too. Though it is just in one direction since I have UVL. I've definitely gotten more used to it, but still do really notice it. My balance has really improved. The VRT has really helped with that. Lots of balancing on one foot with my eyes closed and shaking my head at targets! VRT is only effective with people who have stable conditions, so if you have near full loss, it might still be a good thing to consider. It'll help strengthen your somatosensory balance and might help lessen the amount of oscillopsia (by enforcing your brain's ability to anticipate head movements and using saccadic eye movements to jump your eyes more effectively). Pretty boring exercises though! (....I do like the pure balance ones though....balance boards, etc)

What I'm hoping to overcome this next year is the headaches and tiredness. Ever since I got hit with this sh-t show, I've been so tired, and have headaches all the time. I understand why I'm getting them, but hopefully that all chills out as my brain and system gets more used to the new baseline.

Hockey is a real challenge. When the puck is bounces around near me, I'm done. I can't keep focused on it. But, I've moved down to an easier level, and have adjusted my game. I still have fun out there. But man, I take a lot of pretty funny wipe-outs out there. Full on "blow your tires" wipeouts.

Surfing is a real challenge now, so I'm trying to get in better shape to help out. It's mentally quite a bit more challenging now too. Once I'm up, it's fine, but catching the wave and popping up is really tough. I also have moved to wider, thicker boards that are move stable. I met a guy in Mexico who has had UVL for 15 years. Took him 5 years to get comfortable out surfing again (and he had surfed all his life).

How's walking around outside for you? Does the visual field bounce and shake slightly? That's a big one for me. It's really subtle, but still feels pretty strange. It seems to be improving, but ever so slowly.

How's driving with BVL? It took me 5 months to get back behind the wheel. Over the past 3 months, it has really improved, but I still have really focus and can feel my eyes straining.

How's your motion sensitivity? Still notice "whooshing" feelings in cars? That has improved quite a bit for me over the past few months, but it's definitely still there. Have you been on a roller coaster or any other amusement park rides? I'm heading to Disneyland next summer with the kids and wonder how things on the rides will be for me.

 
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Old 12-19-2012, 08:15 AM   #11
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

Hey surfafrica,


It's good that you're 100% stable. It makes your daily life more predictable and ''normal'' :P

Maybe I should try my hand at VRT again. It might help. This last year has been significantly better in the way I feel. For the last few months I have been more or less vertigo free and felt pretty stable. With that being said, I bought myself a PS3 over the weekend and played quite a bit of first person shooter games and after playing my instability/disequilibrium has seemed to have come back full force. I felt fine while playing but once I got up I felt very wonky. I feel like maybe the game reignited my brain's search for vestibular input haha. I'm going to track that and see if it there is any link.

It's pretty crazy. I saw 3 doctors over the last 4 years and they all said my case (near total bilateral loss, only 5% left in my right ear technically, at a young age with no determinable cause) was the worst they've seen. I remember the last doctor I saw referred me to a physiotherapist in the same building for a quick chat. She told me that since my vestibular organs were shot, my brain would now rely on prioprioception (muscles) and on vision for balance. I knew that already but I really feel I understand it now. When I walk to the washroom in the middle of the night, or walking down a dark road at night for example, I suddenly become very aware of my legs. I can feel them very strongly and my brain suddenly does this dialogue with them - ''Left foot forward, right foot forward'' - sort of thing. It's quite interesting actually.

I'll agree with you. When my ear gets wonky and I feel off balance and the oscillopsia is bad, I feel very tired as well. It's as if your brain gets overloaded with false signals and just gets plain confused. Sometimes sleeping is all you can do.

I used to play hockey as a kid but haven't really tried much since developing this vestibular hell. Although, I went skating a few times back in 2009 I believe and I was fine and able. I can imagine that an intense game of puck handling could get overwhelming though.

I used to skate(board) most of my life. From 8-19 years old it's mostly all I did, haha. Actually, when my vertigo first kicked in, I remember feeling so depressed about it. It was weird. From one day to the next, I was able to skate the local park here, and post-vertigo I couldn't even drop in on anything anymore. Sucked. I tried my hand at skating this summer after not having been on my board for years. Actually, I could push and carve just fine if I'm looking at the horizon but where the problem lies when I am looking directly down at my feet/board and I can't see the horizon. I am completely lost in a sensory way. I plan to keep trying though. Will just have to wait out the winter...

Everything bounces when I walk around outside but either my brain has gotten used to it or I don't notice anymore really (unless it's really bad). I feel like my brain has been handling it better now. I remember when I was knee-deep in the vertigo it was horrid.

I don't really have problems with driving. I feel fine doing so. The oscillopsia was real bad at its peak. Any time I'd drive over a pothole or sewer it would be as if I fell of a massive cliff visually. Now I don't really notice it unless it is a huge bump. I do have problems when I am a passenger in a vehicle. I often feel car sick if I am alone for the ride. It's weird, I guess as a driver your brain ''anticipates'' the next turn so you don't feel sick.

I choose not to go the specialist again because I only have 5% left in my right ear and if they ever determine that I have 0% left and 0% right, they legally have to take my drivers license away. (my specialist told me that)

I never really did well with roller coasters to begin with so I haven't attempted them since my vertigo started.. Good luck!!

 
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Old 03-04-2013, 08:39 PM   #12
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

yokid, you mention that things have gotten quite a bit better over the past year. If you don't mind me asking, how so? Have the symptoms gotten less, or do you think you have just learned to live with them? Either way, I'm thrilled to hear that things did improve.

I'm looking forward to hearing if you end up getting back on a skateboard. I skated when I was 14-17. I tried it again when I was 35 and found it near impossible (and that was before the v-loss!).

 
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:28 PM   #13
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Re: bilateral vestibular loss for the last 4 years

I have been dealing with BVL for about 3 years and can totally identify, as Manybikes stresses in his posts, keep movin and make yourself move. Improvement is measured in weeks and months not days. Hang in there and never give up.

 
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