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Old 11-29-2011, 05:38 PM   #16
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

My mother lived to be 100 and my dad 99. They took very few meds, didn't give much thought to how old they were, they had a large vegetable garden up until they were 91 when we got them to a retirement home. My dad was a bee keeper and mother a homemaker. They went to church regularly but when they fell and broke their hips it was down hill thereafter. Moral of the story --keep standing on 2 feet.

 
Old 11-30-2011, 08:43 AM   #17
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

Evidence-based studies indicate that longevity is based on two major factors, genetics and lifestyle choices.Twin studies have estimated that approximately 20-30% of an individualís lifespan is related to genetics, the rest is due to individual behaviors and environmental factors which can be modified.In addition, it found that lifestyle plays almost no factor in health and longevity after the age of 80, and that almost everything in advanced age is due to genetic factors.

 
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Old 12-02-2011, 08:45 AM   #18
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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Originally Posted by tariq456 View Post
In addition, [the study] found that lifestyle plays almost no factor in health and longevity after the age of 80, and that almost everything in advanced age is due to genetic factors.
That's really strange. I totally believe the first part, that lifestyle is the all important factor. It's the second part that I have a problem with. Perhaps more information is needed to understand why lifestyle is no longer important after age 80. I would think that lifestyle gets more important as one gets older.

Some examples:

1) Muscle-mass steadily declines with age and if you neglect them through lack of exercise, at any age, there will likely be health conscequences.

2) As people get older, they usually have increasing difficulty absorbing vitamins, including the conversion of sunlight to vitamin D3. So it seems that they would need to pay increasing attention to this issue and continue eating healthfully, or healthier, as they get older.

3) The risk for mental decline increases with age, so staying mentally active, at any age, seems to be as important as exercising one's muscles. Remember the old saying: "Use it or lose it."

I would think the laws of physics stay the same throughout the duration of one's life. If anything, more careful attention to lifestyle is needed as one grows older.

 
Old 12-02-2011, 02:55 PM   #19
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

I believe you have a point, my elderly parents exercised with just their activities of daily living. They ate right all their life from their garden which sustained them. My dad had an 8th grade graduation but loved to read especially how to care for his bees. My mother loved to read as well especially her Bible. I am getting close to that 80 mark so I too hope JohnR41you are right that probably genetics has a factor in all of this. (I had a great uncle that went to 106.)

 
Old 12-02-2011, 03:18 PM   #20
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

I miss quoted awhile ago, I was referring to a statement that was made by tarig456 about 80 year olds possibility having longevity genetics. I too was speaking "tongue in cheek."

 
Old 12-03-2011, 05:06 AM   #21
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

How much longer will I live, has been an important question since I was first diagnosed with Heart Failure, Permanent Atrial Fibrillation and Diabetes 2; back in January 1987.

My health continued to get progressively worse, despite the medications. Around 2003, I had frequent chest pains, palpitations, anxiety, depression, was very weak, had swollen legs, ankles and feet. I had constant breathing problems and had to sit straight up in order to sleep or watch TV. I really felt that, along with my decreased health and quality of life, my days were numbered.

Fast forward to now. I am close to 70. I do ten minutes per day on my stepper and 6 minutes on my stationary bike; and 500 pushups, 200 weight curls, 140 weight lifts and one hour power walk almost every day. Plus...... according to my last Echocardiogram and other heart tests, my Heart is getting better, my heart valves are functioning better and I am in extraordinarily good shape for a man my age, regardless of my Heart Failure! And...... my blood sugars are at very healthy levels all the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41
I would think that lifestyle gets more important as one gets older.
I am living proof of it. I made major changes to my lifestyle, especially regarding diet and exercise, and I have been getting progressively better since 2003. I feel not only stronger, at age 70, but I also feel good almost every day. I no longer feel sickly. I really feel good!

If lifestyle changes can do so much good for heart failure patients, imagine what good it could do for other health problems!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR41
The risk for mental decline increases with age, so staying mentally active, at any age, seems to be as important as exercising one's muscles. Remember the old saying: "Use it or lose it."
Say it ain't so, John!

My driving skills are not as good as they were. My concentration and awareness have declined, along with my memory. I take several heart medications, so I wonder how much these meds have to do with my concentration and memory problems, but I know age is a factor!

That said, discounting any unseen or unexpected happening, I now have reasonable expectation to make it another 10 years, until I am 80; and haven't ruled out 90.

At one time, I was being considered for a heart transplant. I can now climb up on the roof and do roof repair among other husbandly chores requested by my wife. It seems that, somehow, someway, my wife found out that I was much better!
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Old 12-03-2011, 07:53 AM   #22
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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Originally Posted by Machaon View Post
How much longer will I live, has been an important question since I was first diagnosed with Heart Failure, Permanent Atrial Fibrillation and Diabetes 2; back in January 1987.

My health continued to get progressively worse, despite the medications. Around 2003, I had frequent chest pains, palpitations, anxiety, depression, was very weak, had swollen legs, ankles and feet. I had constant breathing problems and had to sit straight up in order to sleep or watch TV. I really felt that, along with my decreased health and quality of life, my days were numbered.

Fast forward to now. I am close to 70. I do ten minutes per day on my stepper and 6 minutes on my stationary bike; and 500 pushups, 200 weight curls, 140 weight lifts and one hour power walk almost every day. Plus...... according to my last Echocardiogram and other heart tests, my Heart is getting better, my heart valves are functioning better and I am in extraordinarily good shape for a man my age, regardless of my Heart Failure! And...... my blood sugars are at very healthy levels all the time.



I am living proof of it. I made major changes to my lifestyle, especially regarding diet and exercise, and I have been getting progressively better since 2003. I feel not only stronger, at age 70, but I also feel good almost every day. I no longer feel sickly. I really feel good!

If lifestyle changes can do so much good for heart failure patients, imagine what good it could do for other health problems!



Say it ain't so, John!

My driving skills are not as good as they were. My concentration and awareness have declined, along with my memory. I take several heart medications, so I wonder how much these meds have to do with my concentration and memory problems, but I know age is a factor!

That said, discounting any unseen or unexpected happening, I now have reasonable expectation to make it another 10 years, until I am 80; and haven't ruled out 90.

At one time, I was being considered for a heart transplant. I can now climb up on the roof and do roof repair among other husbandly chores requested by my wife. It seems that, somehow, someway, my wife found out that I was much better!
Machaon it sounds like you are doing all the right things for longevity. We do our part and let God do His part. I think it is good to take a look at ones self and see where we are going and what we can do to help ourselves along the way. It's a good day and age to live in when we have such fine medical help and can help us achieve our goals of long life. (Stay off the roof my friend.)

 
Old 12-03-2011, 10:06 AM   #23
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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Originally Posted by Machaon View Post

Say it ain't so, John!

My driving skills are not as good as they were. My concentration and awareness have declined, along with my memory. I take several heart medications, so I wonder how much these meds have to do with my concentration and memory problems, but I know age is a factor!
I often feel that my mental abilities are slowly declining. What I dislike the most is when I try to remember the name of something, some person, or a word, and it just won't come to me. I find that very discouraging. Thankfully, they claim this can be a normal part of aging and not dementia. Then there are really good days when I feel I am as good as ever.

They say if you misplace your car keys that's normal, but if you forget that you own a car, that's a serious indication of mental decline. When I was about 18 or 19 my mother was searching all over the house for her eyeglasses. She told me she couldn't imagine where they could be. When she said that, I noticed that she was wearing glasses. So, I told her and she was very surprised and embarrassed. Also, occasionally, she would have trouble with names. When I was going to grammar school, she kept calling my best friend "Humphrey". His name was Jeffrey. However, this was not a sign of dementia. She lived to the age of 83 and only had some mental decline in her last year of life because of "fluid pressure" on her brain.

Ordinary forgetfulness can be caused by being tired, lack of sleep, stress, vitamin deficiency and/or a prescription drug. Sometimes you may need more of a certain vitamin(s) because of taking prescription drugs.

I believe we may have the ability to overcome our mental deficiencies the same way that you have overcome your physical deficiencies. It's somewhat uncharted territory, but why not? Look at how you surprised your doctor by improving your physical condition. 15 or 20 years ago, almost all doctors believed that once you lost brain cells, you could never get them back. But today they all know that we have the ability to build new brain cells. Exercise and good nutrition is a big part of it but there's more; it involves a complete lifestyle. We need to get everything working together like sleep and controlling stress, as I mentioned above.

Last edited by JohnR41; 12-03-2011 at 10:08 AM.

 
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Old 12-05-2011, 11:50 AM   #24
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

I think 80 is a good number to shoot for.
Of course, I doubt I'll feel that way once my seventies roll around.

 
Old 12-05-2011, 02:50 PM   #25
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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I think 80 is a good number to shoot for.
Of course, I doubt I'll feel that way once my seventies roll around.
davee 76,
Your seventies will roll around so quickly and, I am not going to shoot for 80 as I am almost there, but, like my parents, I want to shoot for the 100 mark or at least into my 90's and that too is not that far away. I still work and love life as much as I physically can.

 
Old 12-06-2011, 07:58 AM   #26
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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Originally Posted by JohnR41 View Post
I often feel that my mental abilities are slowly declining. What I dislike the most is when I try to remember the name of something, some person, or a word, and it just won't come to me. I find that very discouraging. Thankfully, they claim this can be a normal part of aging and not dementia. Then there are really good days when I feel I am as good as ever.
Forgetting names or words is a little unnerving and aggravating. It makes one wonder if it is going to get much worse as one ages.

I really want to be able to trust my own judgement and reasoning, as I age. Aging also is supposed to take it's toll on reasoning power. That is why the scammers tend to target us "elderly" rather than the younger and more alert.

But..... so far, the reasoning is doing OK, but forgetting names and words really stinks!

Quote:
They say if you misplace your car keys that's normal, but if you forget that you own a car, that's a serious indication of mental decline.
I agree. Forgetting common ordinary life functions is a bad sign, such as forgetting how to do the laundry, or the dishes, or how to rationally respond to posts on HealthBoards, etc.

Quote:
When I was about 18 or 19 my mother was searching all over the house for her eyeglasses. She told me she couldn't imagine where they could be. When she said that, I noticed that she was wearing glasses. So, I told her and she was very surprised and embarrassed.
Watch it! I've done that!

Quote:
Also, occasionally, she would have trouble with names. When I was going to grammar school, she kept calling my best friend "Humphrey". His name was Jeffrey. However, this was not a sign of dementia. She lived to the age of 83 and only had some mental decline in her last year of life because of "fluid pressure" on her brain.
Yeh..... the glasses thing is just a little slip. If you forget that to wear your glasses, and wonder why things are so fuzzy, that should be a warning signal.

Sorry to hear about your mother's "fluid pressure" problems. I hope that she, and you, didn't suffer much near the end.

Quote:
Ordinary forgetfulness can be caused by being tired, lack of sleep, stress, vitamin deficiency and/or a prescription drug. Sometimes you may need more of a certain vitamin(s) because of taking prescription drugs.
My meds, even though they are life saving, and have greatly improved the quality of my life, come with many uncomfortable side effects, and I wonder how many of my symptoms are age-related, or med-related.

Quote:
I believe we may have the ability to overcome our mental deficiencies the same way that you have overcome your physical deficiencies. It's somewhat uncharted territory, but why not?
I agree with you. I don't care what type of illness one has (including aging). The combination of effective medications, healthy diet, exercise and avoiding irritants in one's home; will definite improve the health AND mind.

Quote:
Look at how you surprised your doctor by improving your physical condition.
It surprised me too! I thought that with progressively worsening Heart Failure that I was doomed. Not so!

Quote:
15 or 20 years ago, almost all doctors believed that once you lost brain cells, you could never get them back. But today they all know that we have the ability to build new brain cells. Exercise and good nutrition is a big part of it but there's more; it involves a complete lifestyle. We need to get everything working together like sleep and controlling stress, as I mentioned above.
I'm glad that I revisited your post and decided to respond. I want to research the ability to regrow brain cells. Thanks for bringing this up! Perhaps, at another time, we can compare notes.

Regards, have a nice day and Merry Christmas!!!
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Old 12-06-2011, 08:32 AM   #27
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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davee 76,
I still work and love life as much as I physically can.
I really appreciate your efforts . May you live long and healthy .

 
Old 12-06-2011, 11:50 AM   #28
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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I really appreciate your efforts . May you live long and healthy .
Tariq456, it seems like to be able to live a long and healthy life it had to start before my generation. In my case my ancestors did not have heart disease, cancer, nor did they smoke.

 
Old 12-08-2011, 09:21 AM   #29
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

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I'm glad that I revisited your post and decided to respond. I want to research the ability to regrow brain cells. Thanks for bringing this up! Perhaps, at another time, we can compare notes.
I'm glad you posted too. Anytime you want to talk about this subject, I'm ready to participate; I'm always happy to compare notes.

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Regards, have a nice day and Merry Christmas!!!
Thanks, Merry Christmas!!!


 
Old 12-08-2011, 02:02 PM   #30
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Re: What are your expectations for longevity?

[QUOTE=JohnR41;4891879]I'm glad you posted too. Anytime you want to talk about this subject, I'm ready to participate; I'm always happy to compare notes.

John R, I have a friend who is a physician and a cousin who is doing research on the brain paticularly in older persons. Apparently there is some headway being made in this area. (pardon the pun)

 
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