It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Liver & Pancreas Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-04-2006, 03:38 PM   #1
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: positive ANA & AST
Posts: 2
funkyblood HB User
Question AST 530, ALT normal for over a YEAR!!!!

I've been told its not due to any meds I take and my liver biopsy came back normal. Does anyone else have elevations like mine? Any advice or insight would be great.

 
Old 08-06-2006, 09:37 PM   #2
Senior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 129
shane24 HB User
Re: AST 530, ALT normal for over a YEAR!!!!

If your ALT is normal and your AST is elevated, there could be a problem somewhere else, they are both enzymes found in your Liver, although ALT is found only in the Liver, AST is found in also the Heart and kidneys as well, so you might have a problem with either two. I don't know yet. I would suspect a liver problem if your ALT was elevated.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 08-18-2006, 10:00 PM   #3
Senior Veteran
(male)
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: chicago il
Posts: 552
builder HB Userbuilder HB User
Re: AST 530, ALT normal for over a YEAR!!!!

Funky...was The Biopsy Painful. I Am Afraid To Get It Done

 
Old 08-19-2006, 07:10 AM   #4
Senior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: california
Posts: 177
kmacdona HB User
Re: AST 530, ALT normal for over a YEAR!!!!

AST or SGOT

One of the two main liver function blood serum tests (the other being the ALT test). The purpose of this blood test is to detect a recent myocardial infarction (heart attack); to aid detection and differential diagnosis of acute hepatic disease and to monitor patient progress and prognosis in cardiac and hepatic diseases. AST levels by a commonly used method range from 8 to 20 U/L although some ranges may express a maximum high in the 40s. (Check with your physician.)

AST levels fluctuate in response to the extent of cellular necrosis (cell death) and therefore may be temporarily and minimally elevated early in the disease process, and extremely elevated during the most acute phase. Depending on when the initial sample was drawn, AST levels can rise- indicating increasing disease severity and tissue damage- or fall- indicating disease resolution and tissue repair. Thus, the relative change in AST values serves as a reliable monitoring mechanism.
Maximum elevations are associated with certain diseases and conditions. For example, very high elevations (more than 20 times normal) may indicate acute viral hepatitis, severe skeletal muscle trauma, extensive surgery, drug- induced hepatic injury, and severe liver congestion. High levels (ranging from 10 to 20 times normal) may indicate severe myocardial infarction (heart attack), severe infectious mononucleosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis. High levels may also occur during the resolving stages of conditions that cause maximal elevations. Moderate-to-high levels (ranging from 5 to 10 times normal) may indicate chronic hepatitis and other conditions. Low-to-moderate levels (ranging from 2 to 5 times normal) may indicate metastatic hepatic tumours, acute pancreatitis, pulmonary emboli, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, and fatty liver (steatosis).
SGOT (Serum Glutamic-Oxalocetic Transaminase - AST)

Serum Glutamic Oxalocetic Transaminase or AST is an enzyme found primarily in the liver, heart, kidney, pancreas, and muscles. Seen in tissue damage, especially heart and liver, this enzyme is normally elevated. Vitamin B deficiency and pregnancy are two instances where the enzyme may be decreased.

Normal Adult Range: 0 - 42 U/L
Optimal Adult Reading: 21

 
Closed Thread




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added











All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:57 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Copyright and Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!