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Old 06-29-2005, 05:41 AM   #1
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Fungus caused by Gel nails

For about 3 months I have been having gel nails and recently I noticed some of my nails starts to look a bit dodgy. The nail looks a bit cloudy and discoloured Its not on all the nails, but most.
I went to a different manicurist and she told me that I had some sort of fungus and that the nail was actually starting to lift.

Has anyone else had this problem?

I got some stuff to put underneath the gel nail. The place where I bough it said I didnt need to remove the gel nails and that it'd probably clear up in a few months. He didnt mention anything about fingernails falling off...and I am just worried whats gonna happen!
Should I have my gel nails removed? Has anyone experienced this before? Whats goin on!? lol.

Please help me!
Thanks!
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Old 06-29-2005, 09:32 AM   #2
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Wearing artificial nails is the most common cause of fungal infections. If the artificial nail becomes slightly separated from the real nail (which inevitably happens) moisture gets underneath & creates the perfect environment for fungus to grow.

Have your artificial nails removed & avoid them in the future- they are really not sanitary and infections are extremely common in people who wear them. Cleanse your nails & apply an over the counter antifungal such as Tineacide daily. If the infection does not clear up in a couple of months or recurs, see a doctor.

If you feel any pain, swelling, or throbbing, you may have a secondary infection & you should go see your doctor for antibiotics.

 
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Old 06-29-2005, 02:56 PM   #3
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Artificial nail products DO NOT cause nail infection(s). What causes the client to aquire an infection is when the nail technician does not properly cleanse and sanitize the nails prior to product application, if she/he uses the same files and implements on every client witout properly cleanign and sanitizing them between clients, or if the technician or the client touches anything to their nails after they have been prepped for application. Even answering your cell phone between preparation and application can transfer a fungal spore or a bacteria (such as Pseudomonas) from the surface you touch to your nail. When the technician applies the product, the fungus spore or the bacterium becomes trapped between the nail plate and the overlay.

Fungal spores usually enter into the space between the nail plage and the nail bed. They can do this if there is a cut, tear or break to the seal surrounding the nail plate or the seal that binds the nail plate to the nail bed. A cut, tear or break to the seal can occur when the technician uses too much force in pushing back your cuticles, cleaning under the natural free edge, or cutting your skin with a file or a sharp implement. Fungus infection is characterized by apparent nail plate separation, nail plate yellowing and thickening with apparent debris in the area of separation between the nail plate and the nail bed. The debris is the 'trash' left by the infection as it eats the proteins in your nail plate. The fungus actually live in the skin of the nail bed and not the nail itself. The spores just 'eat' the nail plate from the underside as 'food'. If it is a true fungus infection, you will need to have the overlay removed and leave it off until the infection is completely cured and the nail plate is once again firmly attached to the nail bed. This can take from 6 months to a year or more depending on how 'bad' the infection is and how much of your natural nail plate has lifted and separated from the nail bed. You will need to treat this twice daily with a solution designed specifically for Nail Fungus.

Pseudomonas Bacteria live on every surface we touch, including our skin. They are not normally a problem until they become trapped between the natural nail and the overlay. Pseudomonas bacterial infection is characterized by a light to dark green discoloration in the nail plate. If left untreated, it can progress from green to brown to black. The darker the color, the worse the infection. The discoloration is a by-product of the infection (waste) and is composed mainly of iron compounds. Pseudomonas can infect the nail by being transferred to the prepared nail plate through th euse of infected instruments, implements, contaminated files or 'dirty' sanding bands from a drill. If you touch the prepared nail plate beore application, you can transfer a bacterium. If the nail tech 'blows' on the nail plate surface to remove nail dust from filing, she can 'blow' a bacterium onto the nail plate.

If the nail plate has a green tinge to it, it is probably pseudomonas and not fungus. If it is only the product that has lifted and the stain is on the nail plate underneath the product, it is easier to 'kill'. Simply remove the overlay and leave it off for a few days. In those days, dehydrate the nail plae with alcohol several times and always after getting your hands/nails wet. The bacteria need moisture to grow, so removing its source of nutrient is enough to 'kill' it. The stain will remain and will grow out with the nail plate.

The myth that wearing acrylic nails will give you fungus, is much the same as saying water will drown you. Water will only drown you if you do not take the proper precautions when working with or swimming in this chemical. Acrylic nails do not "cause" nail damage or infections. 99% of the damage done to the natural nails of clients who wear acrylic or gel nails is done by the technician. He/she accomplishes this if they improperly use a high-speed drill on the natural nail plate, improperly use a hand file on the natural nail plate - what we call "rings of fire" in the industry. This is the red marks that run horizontal with the cuticle. If the technician doesn't perform her job completely and properly, the client will experience some sort of problem, even if it is just a little lifting between salon visits.

For more information on natural and artificial nails, please visit my website at www.hooked-on-nails.com (link approved by Moderator 1)

 
Old 06-29-2005, 04:50 PM   #4
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marti
Artificial nail products DO NOT cause nail infection(s).

Pseudomonas Bacteria live on every surface we touch, including our skin. They are not normally a problem until they become trapped between the natural nail and the overlay.
I.E. If you don't wear an overlay (artificial nail) there is usually not a problem with fungal infections. I.E. wearing artificial nails puts you at much higher risk of developing infections. You also admit that the artificial nails are why she got this infection. So how can you say artificial nails do not cause infections?

Fake nails are gross!

 
Old 06-30-2005, 06:28 AM   #5
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Thanks for your input! I have decided to get the gel nails removed, hopefully tommorrow. And I have been given an anti-fungal treatment called "Daktarin" Tincture Liquid for Fungal Nail Infections.Have you heard of that?

I am scared to see whats going on under these fake nails but I have a feeling its only a tiny bit of lifting and some discolouration. No green tinges thank goodness.
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Old 06-30-2005, 06:55 AM   #6
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Quote:
Originally Posted by amaranthine
I.E. If you don't wear an overlay (artificial nail) there is usually not a problem with fungal infections. I.E. wearing artificial nails puts you at much higher risk of developing infections. You also admit that the artificial nails are why she got this infection. So how can you say artificial nails do not cause infections?

Fake nails are gross!
How can I say that the nail product didn't CAUSE the infection? From well over 37 years of experience in the nail industry as a nail technician, major national competition winner and Nationally recognized educator. It is the NAIL TECHNICIAN that causes the infections, not the product itself. It is through improper sanitation, disinfection and sterilization procedures that the NAIL TECHNICIAN causes the infection(s). Why do you think the Beauty Industry employes a large staff of State Board Inspectors? They HAVE to inspect these salons to make sure they are following all the rules of proper sanitation in order to ensure the health of the clients skin and nails. There are WAY too many nail techs out there charging low prices for nails. Because of this, they have to service one client every thirty minutes. To do the service in this short amount of time, they have to cut corners somewhere, and they ALWAYS do it by NOT performing the sanitation, disinfection and sterilization procedures between clients. So, I am sticking by my firt post by saying she got the infection from the nail technicians lack of proper sanitizing, disinfection and preparation techniques as well as the technicians lack of educating the client.

I have 'done' nails since 1969 and NEVER have I had a client aquire a fungus or bacterial infection from any of my procedures or any of my products. WHY? I take the time to completely clear off my table in between clients, spray it with a disinfecting solution and allow it to remain on the surface of the table for a full ten minutes as set forth by the State Board Regulations. I discard any and all contaminated files, paper wipes, etc and put all the used towels in the washing machine. I wash and sanitize my implements ad instruments in an approved solution for a full ten minutes. I wipe off the table top, lay out fresh, clean linens, files, instruments and implements. I ask the client to wash her hands and I wash mine.

Yes, some artificial nails can be gross! They look that way because they were not properly applied or maintained. 50% of the responsibility of the success of the service is the technicians to do her job properly and to educate her client. The other 50% is the clients to take care of them at home between visits.

If you want to see what a proper artificial nail should look like and to educate yourself as a consumer, please visit my website www.hooked-on-nails.com (link approved by Moderator 1).

Last edited by Marti; 06-30-2005 at 06:58 AM.

 
Old 07-02-2005, 05:36 AM   #7
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Well I got my gel nails removed. It turns out I dont have a fungus, my nails were just starting to "lift". A couple of the nails could've developed into a fungus but she said we got to it before it became too serious.
Because the nails had lifted, moisture was able to get in.
At the moment my nails are just a bit tender and weak, but other than that its all pretty good. She said it'll take a couple of months for them to get back to normal and I should just use a nail hardener to thicken the nail.
Thanks for all your help!!!!
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Old 07-03-2005, 08:12 AM   #8
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Hi Marti,

I have got about 5 pedicures in the last few years. I had never had a pedicure until I turned 40! I get my nails done on a regular basis and haven't had a problem Anyhow, my big toenail looked yellow, I had just had a pedicure and about a week later the whole entire nail except for one side just totally fell off from the nail bed! I was in shock. It took a few weeks until I could get the other side off because it hurt. I have been soaking it in vinigar. FUN! The nail bed underneath has a small stain on the top it is growing in about a quarter of an inch.

You gave alot of great information as you have so much experience, I searched it out and all I heard about was fungus. So, my question is: How do I know if this is fungus or bacteria? AND, what is the actual treatment I should use, I'm hoping on not taking anything orally! If it makes any difference my other big toenail cracked halfway off 3 months ago but it seems to have grown in and everything fine. I hope, right now it is painted. My other toenails all seem fine at this point.

Any suggestions? Thanks and happy 4th!!

 
Old 07-11-2005, 02:57 PM   #9
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Quote:
Originally Posted by formerlsa
Hi Marti,

I have got about 5 pedicures in the last few years. I had never had a pedicure until I turned 40! I get my nails done on a regular basis and haven't had a problem Anyhow, my big toenail looked yellow, I had just had a pedicure and about a week later the whole entire nail except for one side just totally fell off from the nail bed! I was in shock. It took a few weeks until I could get the other side off because it hurt. I have been soaking it in vinigar. FUN! The nail bed underneath has a small stain on the top it is growing in about a quarter of an inch.

You gave alot of great information as you have so much experience, I searched it out and all I heard about was fungus. So, my question is: How do I know if this is fungus or bacteria? AND, what is the actual treatment I should use, I'm hoping on not taking anything orally! If it makes any difference my other big toenail cracked halfway off 3 months ago but it seems to have grown in and everything fine. I hope, right now it is painted. My other toenails all seem fine at this point.

Any suggestions? Thanks and happy 4th!!
Fungus is characterized by apparent nail plate separation, thickened and yellowed nails with apparent debris in the area of separation. Fungus will live in the nail bed and eats the proteins in the nail plate as 'food' - that's why the nail plate will appear dried out and crumbly. Fungus will 'eat' its way from the free edge to the matrix, and when it gets all the way to the matrix, the nail plate will generally 'come off'.

Bacteria, on the other hand, is characterized by a green to brown to black discoloration and generally appears between the nail plate and the nail bed if the nail has separated from the nail bed. This is caused by a Pseudomonas bacteria.

If the nail plate is not green, green/brown or brown/black, it is probably a fungus infection. You can try using Reclaim AF from the drugstore. If it is bacterial, simply keeping the nail plate and under the lifted portion dried out with alcohol should kill the baacterium. The stain, which is composed mainly of iron compounds, will remain and will grow out with the nail plate.

Since you say the nail plate "fell off", I am guessing it is fungal and not bacterial. You might see your physician for a proper diagnosis.

 
Old 07-12-2005, 06:28 AM   #10
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Wink Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Thanks Marti, when the nail fell off I looked underneath and it was black, green whatever. I soaked it in vinigar for about 2 weeks. It took awhile for the nail to fall off. Believe it or not the nail has halfway grown back in already (boy I was bumming when i heard it takes a whole year for a big toenail to grow in) Anyway I have painted it, I am hoping that it was bacteria so when this nail is fully grown it will not have any problems. Thanks so much for the info!!

 
Old 07-15-2005, 10:47 PM   #11
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Hi Marti - Got a question - You said when you do nails, you wash your hands and have the client wash hers. My questions is - How do you get the nails completely dry before application? I've never had nails applied professionally, I've always done my own at home, and in the past you've stated to make sure nails are completely dehydrated before applying so there's no moisture on the nail plate, which I'm always careful of. But how do you get the nails completely dry in a salon, is there something they put their fingers in to dry them? Is this a silly question?

 
Old 07-18-2005, 06:43 AM   #12
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Quote:
Originally Posted by cb50
Hi Marti - Got a question - You said when you do nails, you wash your hands and have the client wash hers. My questions is - How do you get the nails completely dry before application? I've never had nails applied professionally, I've always done my own at home, and in the past you've stated to make sure nails are completely dehydrated before applying so there's no moisture on the nail plate, which I'm always careful of. But how do you get the nails completely dry in a salon, is there something they put their fingers in to dry them? Is this a silly question?
Dry the hands and nails with a soft lint-free wipe such as a paper towel. File and shape the free edge and clean underneath the free edge. Push back the cuticles and clip off any skin that is sticking up and waving at you. Wash your hands/nails again to remove all traces of nail dust and clippings. Wipe dry. If you are applying artificial nail products, use the prep product to wipe each nail to remove moisture. Prep will temporarily dehydrate the nail plate for up to thirty minutes, which generally is enough time to properly apply product.

If you are only performing a manicure, you can wipe the nails with straight alcohol to remove any excess moisture which will allow the polish to better adhere to the nail surface.

For instructions on how to perform a 'salon' manicure, please visit my website www.hooked-on-nails.com (link approved by Moderator 1.)

 
Old 07-22-2005, 07:29 PM   #13
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Marti - I just got the acrylic taken off my nails for good. I had been having my nails done for years without any problems but just noticed that I was getting thick skin under my nails. When I tried to cut this away from my two middle fingers I loosened the nail from the nail bed at the tips. Is this a kind of fungus? I worry now about dirt getting under the nail tips and an infections starting? What should I do?

 
Old 07-25-2005, 11:25 AM   #14
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Re: Fungus caused by Gel nails

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vavip
Marti - I just got the acrylic taken off my nails for good. I had been having my nails done for years without any problems but just noticed that I was getting thick skin under my nails. When I tried to cut this away from my two middle fingers I loosened the nail from the nail bed at the tips. Is this a kind of fungus? I worry now about dirt getting under the nail tips and an infections starting? What should I do?
Fungus is characterized by a yellowish discoloration of the nail plate, nail plate thickening, nail plate separation and apparent debris in the area of separation.

Allergic reaction, on the other hand, can also cause nail plate separation where the skin may appear to be thickened. Sometimes, the nail bed or the skin at the free edge will thicken in an effort to protect itself from the allergen.

In either case, the nail plate will grow out from the matrix firmly attached to the nail bed and will push the lifted portion forward as it does so.

The only way to tell if it is fungal related or 'allergic reaction' related is to visit you rdermatologist for a diagnosis. In the meantime, keep the area clean and dry. Fungal spores require moisture to continue growing and food to eat - the spores 'eat' the proteins in the nail plate which causes the apparent debris in the area of separation. Wear gloves when having your hands in water a lot or whenever using any type of household cleaning solution. After hand washing, apply a drop of either alcohol or tea tree oil into the area of separation to help remove the excess moisture from the water ad to act as an 'antisceptic' for bacteria.

 
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