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Old 08-15-2012, 03:07 PM   #1
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Wink Need help understanding X-ray results

I had a bad car accident June 12th and had an X-ray and I don't understand what my results mean. Please help!

Findings: There are 5 nonrib-bearing lumbar type vertebral segments followed by a transitional verterebral segment with partial sacralization. There is no compression fracture or significant spondylolisthesis. A narrowed disc space is noted between the transitional segment and sacrum. Disc spaces otherwise appear relatively well preserved. No significant endplate osteophyte formation.

Impression: No acute Osseous abnormality. Transitional anatomy at the lumbosacral junction

Thank you in advance
Becky

 
Old 08-15-2012, 08:49 PM   #2
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Re: Need help understanding X-ray results

Welcome to the board. As you probably know, X-rays mainly show bone and are not indicative of other damage that may have occurred in your lumbar spine, such as a disc problem or injury to soft tissue.

The X-ray indicates that the bones of your lower spine are in good shape. There is one "abnormality" that is noted. Most people have 5 lumbar vertebrae, but a certain part of the population (6%) is born with a sixth vertebra that is usually partially connected to the L5 vertebra. This is known as a "partial sacralization" because this transitional vertebra is partially attached to the sacrum.

No compression fracture is present nor is there any spondylolisthesis, which is a situation where one vertebra slides over the top of the adjacent vertebra. This condition can cause instability...but good news, you do not have this.

The spaces between the vertebrae is well maintained...and there are no bone spurs/bony overgrowths on the endplates of the vertebrae. This is the area that adjoins the disc space...and yours appear to be normal in appearance.

So the reporter concludes by stating that there are no problems with the bones and mentions that there is a transitional vertebra where the lumbar and sacral segments of the spine meet.

The topic of whether a partial sacralization of the L5 vertebra causes pain, or not, is somewhat controversial. People often have this situation but are unaware of it because it causes no symptoms. But others say it can cause lower back pain and other types of symptoms.

How are you feeling? I would suggest if you are in a good deal of pain that you try to arrange to have a MRI which would show disc herniation, issues with soft tissue, etc. Then you would have a more complete picture of the lumbar spine.

 
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