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Old 03-01-2013, 02:00 AM   #1
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MRI lumbar spine. please guide me!

i went through an MRI. and the following are the results. i am just 21. and i am very tensed. if anyone could guide me through it.

report: sagittal and axial T1/T2W MRI sequences through lumbosacral spine were performed. no prior comparison.
the study demonstrates normal alignment with straightening of the curvature signifying muscular spasm.
there is disc dessication noted from L5/S1 level which is associated with broadbased disc herniation posteroinferiorly directed indenting thecal sac. this is quite significant and also associated with narrowing of both neural foramina at this evel.
rest of the lumbar discs are within normal limits.
conus terminates at its expected anatomic position.
there is no paraspinal soft tissue abnormality of any significance.
CONCLUSION: dessicated disc with large disc bulge posteriorly directed at the level L4/L5. -

Last edited by Administrator; 03-01-2013 at 03:17 AM.

 
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:25 PM   #2
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Re: MRI lumbar spine . plz guide!

You have a disc that is, essentially, drying out. In between your vertebrae are cushion-like discs that absorb shock. With age and wear and tear, these dry out and erode. If you were in your 80's, an MRI showing disc desiccation would be expected. Being in your 20's, though, your MRI findings point to an injury or degenerative disc disease. Speak to your doctor about conservative treatment options -- physical therapy and epidural steroid injections before. These may be enough to grant relief from pain.

Unfortunately, once that natural gel-like disc is gone, it's gone. Surgeons can insert titanium discs as replacements. But there are risks to consider, as there are with any surgery.

 
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Old 03-07-2013, 04:43 AM   #3
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Re: MRI lumbar spine . plz guide!

its very depressing what u just told.
i dont have pain now. its gone! pain has gone. aint there in lower back or any that radiates to legs. but when i walk i can feel theres smthng dislocated or irritating in my lower back. apart from this, m ok.
would the disc never heal? :'(

 
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Old 03-07-2013, 06:25 AM   #4
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Re: MRI lumbar spine . plz guide!

The space in between the disc doesn't heal, it continues to degenerate. Remember, with age, this is often a normal condition. But normally it happens slowly. When it happens quickly, and in someone young, it's for a reason -- most often injury related. If you're not experiencing pain that's great! These findings can pop up on an MRI can alarm people all the time even when they haven't caused a single symptom. You can ask you physician about proactive measures like a short course of physical therapy to learn back bracing exercises and better ways to protect the spine while sitting, standing and working. As someone who has went through PT for the neck and arm, it can sometimes be very helpful in preventing the need for further medical intervention.

As the disc continues to degenerate (again, you may be fine now and the disc isn't going anywhere, but you can easily pull your back out, slip on ice or fall and the disc can slip even further. Or with time the space between the disc will continue to narrow), it can put pressure on your nerves. This can cause sciatic pain (pain traveling down your back into your butt and legs (it can feel sharp and even burning). Or it can cause a constant aching to where you become down in your back often.

Again, I have a master's in health care and have studied with spine physicians. They always recommend conservative measures first. If no pain, don't worry about it. If you scanned your whole body, you will find irregularities to worry about. If you have pain, check into physical therapy. Ask for a PT who does backs (some PTs like to specialize). Try anti-inflammatories -- ibuprofen and check into steroid epidural injections. They are not as scary as they sound when done by a qualified doctor (I had one in 2007 and haven't had a problem with S1 since).

But.. if it's at the point where it just feel irritated... having a few sessions with a PT may be enough. They can evaluate how you walk, sit and stand and find weaknesses that may be contributing to your back pain. So while you have this disc degenerating and pressing on things, simple adjustments in body positions and how you work, sit, etc. may be all you need. I would suggest speaking with your doctor.

 
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