It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Osteoporosis Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-06-2008, 07:32 PM   #16
Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 61
Elaine444 HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Wow, what an interesting thread! I would have never thought to use my exercise ball in place of my chair while sitting at the computer! I too find myself slouching and bending forward. I just started a comprehensive pain management and physical therapy/occupational therapy program and last week we were talking about computer ergonomics. I realized my whole set up was wrong. I have since drastically improved my office desk with my supervisors help, but my home "office" leaves much to be desired.

Sounds like everything I have learned so far has been covered here, but I wanted to mention that something else that helps me is to get up and walk around and stretch every twenty minutes or so if I am going to be on the computer for a while. The longer the time I am sitting on the computer engrossed in whatever I am doing the more I slouch. So forcing myself to get up for a few minutes brings me back to being more aware of my body. Just thought I would throw that in there. Thanks for all the info offered here!
Elaine

 
Old 02-06-2008, 08:35 PM   #17
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: u.s.
Posts: 1,679
osteoblast HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

DesertBloom- Probably you are right that I need to reinflate the ball. I haven't done it in a year -it must be time. Now I just need to find where I put the stuff to do it! I am going to try to be very careful about the ears over shoulders and chin tucked in. Thank you for mentioning the little neck pillow thing, that might be useful. I will request a catalog.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 02-06-2008, 10:18 PM   #18
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: California
Posts: 2,704
taape HB Usertaape HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Osteoblast,
My desk is really a flat table top with a motor so it can be moved up and down - for sitting or standing. Otherwise the table top is just like a regular flat surface. The stand I have for the monitor was not high enough so I have two of them on top of one another. For home, I'm going to see if a custom one could be made but for work, they buy out of a catalog. If your planning to sit at the desk as well as stand then you need a riser that is adjustable or you can add or take away a book or two if your using phone books to elevate to the correct eye level. Because if you raise the monitor to the correct level while standing it would bend your neck to see monitor if you were sitting down.

Now for the keyboard position ~ if your standing up you want the keyboard at an angle. I wish I knew the degrees but I don't.You want your wrists higher than your fingers, with your fingers pointing down but not such an angle that they point straight down towards your feet. The device I have attaches to the table top and it adjusts the angle and then the keyboard sits on top of it. Not the best design but I have a non slip piece of plastic on it so the keyboard doesn't slip down towards the table top. I think a wedge cut out out of wood or plastic at the correct angle would work fine. The hand position is very different if your sitting down using the computer. I hope this description makes some sense. I wish I could draw it for you.

Last edited by taape; 02-06-2008 at 10:20 PM.

 
Old 02-07-2008, 06:18 AM   #19
Senior Member
(male)
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tempe, AZ
Posts: 215
PikaB HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Quote:
Originally Posted by osteoblast View Post
...So, regarding the 16 inch stand that you put on the desk ,could you tell me who makes the stand is so I can look for it? ...One thing I would mention to you is that I have the Juvent and have used it for a little over a year now...
The little stand/table that I use was made many years ago by an manufacturer that is no longer in business. But any little side table that's the height you want should work as well.

A week ago I switched from the Soloflex WBV to Juvent. It seems much more promising.

 
Old 02-07-2008, 11:51 AM   #20
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
DesertBloom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 1,484
DesertBloom HB UserDesertBloom HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Hi Elaine: If you try using the ball for a chair just be careful and practice with it first. If the ball isn't high enough to put your hips and knees at a 90 degree angle then you need a larger ball. They have ball chairs, but I don't know if they would work as well. The seat is a swiss ball and then it has arms, legs and a back on it. To me that seems to defeat the purpose because you want to have to keep the ball stationary while you sit, which means you constantly have to keep your back straight and stomache tight, and the arms, back and legs takes away all the work you have to do to stay on it. I don't use my ball all the time but I alternate between that and my computer chair. I also make sure I get up frequently and move around doing stretches. Sitting is really bad for your spine.

 
Old 02-07-2008, 12:44 PM   #21
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
DesertBloom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 1,484
DesertBloom HB UserDesertBloom HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Hi All: I just wanted to warn some about using the Swiss ball for a computer chair or for exercises. I didn't properly inflate my ball and while doing an exercise, I rolled right off of it. I found out that if the ball isn't kept inflated to the max, it becomes too soft and could cause you to fall off. I was doing a balance exercise on it and sat down, sinking into the ball too far because it didn't have enough air and rolled right off, so just be careful with it!!!

 
Old 02-07-2008, 02:31 PM   #22
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: reno, nv, usa
Posts: 33
sierrawalker HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Thought I would see what available now for monitors. If you have a LCD monitor they make monitor arms which should allow you to move the monitor up for standing & lower when sitting.

Mine are older & bigger for the heavier monitors we all used to use. They clamp to a counter/desk & easily move up, down & sideways.

Last edited by moderator2; 02-07-2008 at 05:08 PM. Reason: posted commercial websites

 
Old 02-07-2008, 02:32 PM   #23
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
DesertBloom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 1,484
DesertBloom HB UserDesertBloom HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Posture stretches and exercises:

I’ve been going to PT for 4 months for the above and here are some of my favs, if you want to try them.

While reading at the computer, place your thumb at the base of your throat and your index finger under your chin. Hold this for as long as comfortable. You can’t do it while typing but you can use this when reading. It forces your neck, shoulders and head into an upright position so you can’t drop your head. I try to do this at least 50 % of the time that I’m reading, at the computer, you’ll get used to it after you’ve done it for awhile.

While doing the above, with your thumb and index finger, move your neck backwards about 2 inches and return, keeping your chin level, (don’t tip your head). This strengthens your neck, and shoulders.

Wall pushups are good for your arms, traps, and chest. Stand facing the wall, arms at shoulder height, palms of hands flat on the wall, and move forward towards the wall, like a standing pushup. Your feet should be about 2 feet from the wall, but it will depend on the length of your arms.

Stand at an open doorway and put both palms on either side of the doorway at shoulder height, lean forward through the open door, without moving your legs, keeping body straight.

Stand against a wall with stomach, toes touching it, with arms in the “up against the wall pose” police use. Move each arm back away from the wall, one at a time so your arms are moving backwards about 6 inches from the wall.

If you have therabands, put a knot in the middle of 5 foot long piece, and close a door onto the knot so the bands don’t move, placing it above the door knob, so it’s about chest height. With the bands closed between the door jam (closed door), do chest rows, pinching shoulder blades together when your fists reach your chest, like you are rowing a boat, but with arms at chest level.

Using the therabands, placed into a closed door, grab each end of the band and pull your arms back towards your hips and move your “straight” arms behind you about 6 inches and return. Place the knotted band at stomach height in the door.

Do shoulder shrugs with the theraband wedged between the top/middle part of the door (close door onto knot). Stand with your back against the door arms straight down and holding bands, in both hands, proceed to do shoulder shrugs.

You can repeat these as many times as you want, but you should probably start out at 3 sets of 10 and increase if you want.

If you don’t understand some of these I’ll try to explain further, just let me know.

 
Old 02-11-2008, 11:24 AM   #24
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: u.s.
Posts: 1,679
osteoblast HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

DesertBloom-Thank you fortaking the time to write down all the exercises. It took me a little while to respond because I wanted to do all of them first. Some of these were exercises that I knew and some not. So, I really appreciate it.
The using thumb at base of neck and forefinger at chin is actually an excellent reminder- I have used that quite a bit since you wrote it.
On the exercises using a band with a knot, I have purchased a resistance tube made by SPRI that has a tab like device on it. You put the tab like device in the door jamb and the two ends have handles on them that you can pull on that makes it easier for me. But, I have to add that the easiest tube had handles that had no rigidity they just bent in your hand so they did no good. The heavier tubing-green has rigid handles that work great. I think there is an option to order firm handles if you purchase on line. Have you ever used this sort of thing?
How do you keep these exercises in mind , that is how do you remember to do them? Do you have a list that you use on a daily basis, or do you keep pictures(copies) of them that you flip through?
I hope you are having a colorful day!!!!

Last edited by osteoblast; 02-11-2008 at 11:27 AM.

 
Old 02-11-2008, 12:56 PM   #25
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
DesertBloom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: CA, USA
Posts: 1,484
DesertBloom HB UserDesertBloom HB User
Re: Posture while looking at the computer monitor

Hi Osteo~~Glad you liked the exercises. I didn't post all that I do, because some are pretty generic neck and shoulder exercises. I also didn't include the rest of the stretches since they are specifically for the cervical spine. If anyone is interested in them I can post those too. The stretches are really good for loosening up a stiff neck, and helping with the pain and range of motion.

I use the therabands with handles at PT, but what they give you for home use is the theraband that comes on a roll. They just cut off the length that you want and the color/resistance you'll be using. I have the red (easiest) green, and blue therabands without the handles. The kind that has the handle is much easier to use, but what I have works fine as well. I think the reason they give you these is so you don't have to spend any money for the home exercises.

I remember the exercises by grouping them by items used. There's 4 stretches, which is what you start with, then the 3 wall/open door exercises, the 3 with therabands, and 3 with free weights. I also do some others with machines which I can't do at home. They did give me a print out of all the exercises with a picture for each, but I misplaced that 3 mos ago and haven't looked for it yet. so much for my memory. I usually visualize things to remember them, except for things I misplace, and that's another story. I also do memory games almost every day and use mnemonics a lot. The APA (Amer Psychology Assoc) has some things you could try for memory, but I haven't been there lately. I use brain games on the computer, and I like word games or crosswords which all help a lot.

I forgot to mention that the flowers I have inside are amaryliss, paper whites, and hyacinth. The paper whites smell incredible and are a cross between a gardenia and jasmine scent together. That flower fills the room with scent.

Hope you are having a good day too

Last edited by DesertBloom; 02-11-2008 at 04:49 PM.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Cervical collar to correct posture? susu2007 Spinal Cord Disorders 1 09-20-2008 03:07 PM
Do you have proper posture ? Red60 Acid Reflux / GERD 1 04-20-2008 07:21 AM
Head Forward Posture Mosmom TMJ Disorder -TemporoMandibular Joint 17 01-09-2008 10:54 AM
Help a newbie out. (Posture related) backpain_no_mo Spinal Cord Disorders 2 03-31-2007 11:39 AM
Twitching Fingers / sleep posture yeahmon General Health 0 12-17-2006 07:36 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:29 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com
Terms of Use 1998-2014 HealthBoards.com All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!