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Old 08-19-2008, 01:13 PM   #1
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Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi everyone. I was just curious but is borderline personality disorder inheritable or hereditary? I ask because I have this disorder along with major depression and anxiety disorder and my significant other has bipolar disorder. Are any of these disorders/diseases inheritable or hereditary? I am wanting to get pregnant sometime in the future (though not quite yet) and am worried about our baby possibly inheriting one or more of these disorders. Please help!

 
Old 08-19-2008, 01:30 PM   #2
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Borderline, I'm not sure, but I believe it can be....
but as far as bi-polar, I've heard that it is passed down from mother to son, or from father to daughter. So if your BF has it and you have a daughter, be prepared.

 
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Old 08-19-2008, 06:54 PM   #3
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

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Originally Posted by rosequartz View Post
Borderline, I'm not sure, but I believe it can be....
but as far as bi-polar, I've heard that it is passed down from mother to son, or from father to daughter. So if your BF has it and you have a daughter, be prepared.
Oh ok. Thanks for this information. What about anxiety disorder and depression? Can it be passed down from parent to child?

 
Old 08-20-2008, 02:48 AM   #4
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi SpicyGirl82,

There are many many myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings about borderline personality disorder. So many doctors find dealing with BPD patients very challenging perhaps due to the extreme behaviour that is "sometimes" associated with this "condition"

I am PTSD + Hashimoto's (Thyroid) + Depression + BPD. I have been doing an awful lot of research about BPD recently and read some good and some not so good books about it.

Some of the older books <1990, are quite out of date by contemporary understandings of this disorder, so I now try to concentrate of more modern books writen by professionals, or co-authored between professional and patient. The co-authored boods are the best in my view. What I have found out is quite simply that BPD is a heritable condition- BUT- - - - - - - - - - develop when the second generation's vulnerablity factors are triggered by adverse circumstances such that their defence mechanisms also become faulty.

It is a very complex condition, characteristcs are inheritable, just like heart disease, diabetes, breast cancer, sporting ability, ADHD, flat feet, musicality, and left handedness.

There are so many variables, tooo tooo many to mention so please go to the library and stock up on some really good books. Read a range of professional opinions about BPD, no two will totally agree, but there are definitley common themes present.

Things We Inherit: Our temprament, flighty / clam / stoic / agressive / emotional etc.
Our Enviornment Affects: Beliefs / values / behaviour / morals / as these things are learned.
Our Experiences: happy childhood / harsh judgemental parents / abuse / neglect / these things affect our psyche because reactions to these provide messages to us about our sense of self and place in the world.

Together, these variables interact with an underlying personality characteristics and heritability to BPD chararacteristcs in the presence of adversity and chronic stress to develop into fully fledged BPD.

Now not everyone who develops BPD had exactly the same expereinces, nor the same ubrininging, nor the same genes and this partly leads to the differences on the continum of the BPD condition.

Even the term fully fledged BPD is a bit misleading tooo. I am only very mildly BPD, another person on the Personality Disorder Board is seriously struggling with self-harm impulses, another with drug dependency, another with substance abuse, another with suicide and another with anger etc etc.

What I can tell you it that there are 3 dimensions to this condition. And you only need to have two of them.
1) The affective area: unstable emotions, splitting, dissociating etc.
2) The Cognitive area: overwhellming negative thinking, self talk, fluctuating competence, fears of abandonment (?), heightened sensitivity to rejection, paranoid ideation, sucidal ideation, unstable sense of self and or identity. etc.
3) The behavioural area: propensity for risk taking and impulsivity including acts related to drugs, spending, self-harm, gambling, lawlessness, delingquncy, unsafe sex, stealing etc etc.

So you see that no two BPD people will be exactly alike. For instance I am purely affective and cognitive, but when I'm on a serious psychological downhill slide, the suicidal and paranoid ideation becomes paramount, and all consuming, and I loose my ability to think things through rationally (I guess irrationality is self-evident).
The other thing that makes a huge difference is that all BPD people expereince different triggers, sor expereince the same triggers differently.

My point is this, Some of the books I'v read and found helpful are:-

1996, Richard Moskovitz, Lost in the Mirror, 2nd Edition: An Inside Look at Borderline Personality Disorder.
2004, Jerold J., M.D. Kreisman Hal Straus, ‘Sometimes I Act Crazy: Living with Borderline Personality Disorder.
2008, Roy Krawitz and Wendy Jackson, ‘Borderline Personality Disorder: The facts’, Oxford University Press, New York. ISBN13: 9780199202966ISBN10: 0199202966

The last book by Krawitz and Jackson was without doubt the best book I've ever read on BPD. No nonsense, co-authored, factual, behind the thinking and emotions driving this complex condition, and an all round good read for BPD people and anyone with an interest in it. Give the reading a try, and get back to this board and let me know how you're getting on, I'd like to know how you are getting on in dealing with this very complex and debilitating condition.
I do have some understanding in how it can affect people, and just how difficult it is to try and convey your feelings when in the depths of despair , guilt, loathing, fear, and even sheer terror.

Take care now . . .x x

Regards, Waratah

p.s. the other thing you might like to try is reading many of the posts from BPD people right here on the boards too. They'll give you some insight into how others experience this "condition"

Last edited by waratah; 09-15-2008 at 03:12 AM. Reason: clarity

 
Old 08-20-2008, 04:19 AM   #5
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Thanks for your post Waratah! I'll try reading some of those books you recommended. Also, have you read the Walking On Eggshells book about borderline personality disorder? I have heard that it is a good book.

 
Old 08-20-2008, 04:54 AM   #6
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi SpicyGirl82,

I have to admit that I haven't read 'Walking on Eggshells' but it is definitley on my must read list. I thought I'd try and read all the medical or quasi-medico books first then gravitate to the sociology part of BPD once I've got a comprehensive medico view.
The idea is to explore a range of views on BPD, because no one can completely agree, so I find that drawing on a range of material helps me to build a bit of a map or understanding about the views of various interested parties.

i hope this makes sense,

best wishes, waratah

 
Old 08-20-2008, 06:40 PM   #7
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Quote:
Originally Posted by waratah View Post
Hi SpicyGirl82,

I have to admit that I haven't read 'Walking on Eggshells' but it is definitley on my must read list. I thought I'd try and read all the medical or quasi-medico books first then gravitate to the sociology part of BPD once I've got a comprehensive medico view.
The idea is to explore a range of views on BPD, because no one can completely agree, so I find that drawing on a range of material helps me to build a bit of a map or understanding about the views of various interested parties.

i hope this makes sense,

best wishes, waratah
Oh ok. What kind of book do you recommend for a first time reader on borderline personality disorder? Basically I'm looking for a primer on the disorder such as a For Dummies book.

 
Old 08-23-2008, 06:57 PM   #8
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpicyGirl82 View Post
Oh ok. What kind of book do you recommend for a first time reader on borderline personality disorder? Basically I'm looking for a primer on the disorder such as a For Dummies book.
Hi SpicyGirl82,

[FONT="Comic Sans MS"]BPD for Dummies[/FONT], - you're a comic! I would hope that the general population might read that one book just so they can know a bit more than how BPD is portrayed by the media. i.e the absolute extreme end of the BPD continum.

A couple of good books? Well now, there are so many, but finding one that suits your reading style and your purpose for reading I imagine will be a personal choice. But two books I've found to be quite good are:

2008, Roy Krawitz and Wendy Jackson, ‘Borderline Personality Disorder: The facts’, Oxford University Press, New York.ISBN13: 9780199202966ISBN10: 0199202966,

and . . .,

2007, Alexander Chapman, Kim Gratz, Perry Hoffman, ‘The Borderline Personality Survival Guide: Everything you need to know about living with BPD’, New Harbinger Publications, ISBN: 1572245077


So if you can find these, this is a good start I feel.
Just remember, that all BPD people present differently, so there's a lot of variation in degrees of difficulty each expereinces, and in different aspects of the disorder.

Go and have a read, and get back to me anytime to discuss BPD. I'm really interested in hearing others BPD stories too.

I had no idea that BPD carries such a stigma until I expereinced some pretty shabby treatment from my GP of 13+ years when I was recently diagnosed by the 'lady shrink' as having an underlying 'borderline personality structure'. My GP just couldn't cope at all. Despite knowing me for so so long, at every appointment she kept asking me about my 'risk taking behaviour' , and I'm just a suburban mom, work as a P/T high school teacher, married with 2 teenagers, Satruday is kids soccer, Wednesday is music lessons etc etc. So GP totally flipped out - silly huh?

I still feel quite annoyed with the way I was treated by my GP, but I've moved on now to a new GP, but now I face a problem there too.

I've only just started with this new GP (who wasn't the refering doc to go to shrink), so it's early days and we're still building a professional relationship. The 'lady shrink' wants to write to the new GP, and give new GP all the information about my treatment and diagnoses. I'm really really worried that new GP may react badly to this information in the same way my old GP did. Recall that old GP of 13+ years overlooked all our calm and settled history together and became suspicous and questioning when given the underlying BPD diagnoes. So the new GP, who is just lovely , but doesn't know me very well, is about to receive some startling information, and I'm really really worried that the same BPD stigma may come to affect our emerging relationship.

At this stage, I haven't given new GP name or address to 'lady shrink', as I explained to 'lady shrink' what had occured previously and I was only a new patient with the new GP
.
What do you think? Do I give new GP name and address to 'lady shrink', or not? I'm really quite worried about it all.

I know that eventually I'm going to have to either go back to old GP of 13+ years with the stigma problem, OR, give name of new GP to 'lady shrink' and risk that the BPD stigma occurs there again too.

I do hope you're well . . . .
Best wishes, waratah

 
Old 09-04-2008, 09:31 PM   #9
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

I have two book recommendations..."I Hate You, Don't Leave Me!" is the first one. I read it years ago and no longer have it so I'm not sure of the author. But living with BPD, this book brought me to tears many times because it's honest, heartfelt, and blunt in its descriptions of what BPD really is. I think it will always be my favorite book on this subject. The other one is called "The Angry Heart - Overcoming Borderline and Addictive Disorders" & it's by Joseph Santoro, PH.D. It's a good interactive book with self help exercises. It's been a huge help for me in my quest to overcome BPD behaviors. Good luck!!

 
Old 09-05-2008, 12:10 AM   #10
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynae76 View Post
I have two book recommendations..."I Hate You, Don't Leave Me!" is the first one. I read it years ago and no longer have it so I'm not sure of the author. But living with BPD, this book brought me to tears many times because it's honest, heartfelt, and blunt in its descriptions of what BPD really is. I think it will always be my favorite book on this subject. The other one is called "The Angry Heart - Overcoming Borderline and Addictive Disorders" & it's by Joseph Santoro, PH.D. It's a good interactive book with self help exercises. It's been a huge help for me in my quest to overcome BPD behaviors. Good luck!!
Thanks Lynae!

 
Old 09-05-2008, 12:45 AM   #11
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi SpicyGirl82 & Lynae76,

Sorry to jump in on your post Lynae76 about the books that are helping you with the BPD behaviours. This is getting interesting because, the books you've chosen as your favourites, demonstrate to me the broad and far-reaching variablility in borderline presentations among BPD people.

I found each of the books Lynae76 liked, made me want to throw both these books straight into the nearest paper pulp/shredder, closely followed by 'yours truly'. . . . . .lol.

But seriously, if we put all the so called 'borderline characteristics' into a giant matrices and dispersed these defining characteristics around the diagram, then asked BPD people to stand next to the key variable that best characterised their BPD challenges. Then each and every BPD person would be standing and identifying with quite divergent and different characteristcs.

This is what makes debate about what is, and what is not, BPD - very interesting.
Now I don't claim to be the font of all knowledge about BPD, but I know that I have a range of symptoms including emotional intensity & dysregulation, self/identity, dissociation, "s . . . d" and "p . . .d" ideation under extreme stress and the Dx from the 'lady shrink', AND, I know that other BPD people have an entirely diffferent set of characteristics they find equally challenging. e.g impulsive behaviour

So, what exactly is BPD?

Well, it seems that even the 'lofty professionals' can't quite agree on this one either. Just read any of the professional journals and there are compelling and competing accounts of the nomenclature of BPD leading to the BPD label being applied to all sorts of presentations.

Anyway very sorry, I'm completely off topic here - just venting after my visit with the 'lady shrink' yesterday. I collected another couple of labels (amazing!- not!) - but, All went well nevertheless.

Let me know how you're getting on,
regards, waratah

Last edited by waratah; 09-17-2008 at 01:44 AM. Reason: clarity

 
Old 09-19-2008, 04:05 PM   #12
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi...I just wanted to jump in here; I recently got diagnosed with BPD (along with a list of other diagnoses) and while I certainly am not read up on anything, I would like to repsond to the original question of if this is an inherited condition or not. My belief is that certain genetic factors determine if you are more likely to develop certain conditions, and your environment plays a part too...so if you display behaviors/actions to a small child, the child is more apt to copy them eventually. (Like many alcoholics have children who grow up and drink a lot, plus they have the genetic weakness for it too). For instance, my daughter grew up in a house full of books, so she was reading by age 3...yet she 'inherited' my behavior of having meltdowns & distortions of emotions. If she was raised by more serene people, maybe she wouldn't have meltdowns...who knows - on the other hand she IS a Leo, so maybe she's just ferocious astrologically anyway, LOL.
Good luck with your decision to parent - you can do it, I'm sure!
And thanks for the list of books, I will definitely be checking some out....

 
Old 09-21-2008, 02:54 PM   #13
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Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Waratah,

I really had to chuckle at your description of what you'd like to do with my book recommendations. It's funny how we all relate to different things in different ways. The reason I loved those books so much is because they had a sort of "I've been there...you're not alone" kind of feel to them. In my opinion they were written with a more personal feel to them. I'm not into all the clinical psyco-babble...I prefer a more intimate, human approach to things. I guess that's the beauty of us "crazies." We're crazy in our own unique ways! LOL

As far as whether or not BPD is inherited, I believe that the predisposition, like Sunka said, may be there, but that it may just be due to the environment the children are raised in. Neither of my parents are Borderline, though my father is an alcoholic and my mother has had bouts of depression and impulsive behaviors due to her inability to cope with certain emotional issues. I truly believe that BPD is more of a "circumstancial" disorder, meaning that it manifests as a set of survival tools when a person is faced with "traumas" (not only abuse though) that they don't know how to deal with. Each of us is wired with our own individual set of abilities and strengths, as well as weaknesses and we deal with things in the way that works for us at the time, whether it's healthy or not in the end. I believe that although negative in many cases, my coping skills are what saved my life after a traumatic and abusive childhood.

Just my two & a half cents here though...I'm interested in differing opinions. I have A LOT to say on this subject and could go on for hours.

Last edited by Lynae76; 09-21-2008 at 02:54 PM.

 
Old 09-22-2008, 03:44 AM   #14
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Talking Re: Is borderline personality disorder inheritable?

Hi Lynae76 and all on this thread, (so soorry this is a long long post)

"I guess that's the beauty of us "crazies." We're crazy in our own unique ways!" LOL . . . . .


Ohhh, my goodness, it's so nice to hear the voice of another self-confessed "BPD crazy" and with a generous dose of sardonic humour . . . . . too too funny Geezzz, this really gave me a well earned laugh this afternoon - a BIG THANK YOU - I really needed it today.

"As far as whether or not BPD is inherited,Neither of my parents are Borderline, though my father is an alcoholic and my mother has had bouts of depression and impulsive behaviors due to her inability to cope with certain emotional issues."

I agree with your sentiment of BPD being something that can be developed due to environment, but differ in opinion with you over the biological pre-disposition because I see the biological 'genes' component being of greater influence than environment alone. This doesn't discount environmental factors altogether, but makes these "dependent" on the presence of genes for their frutition. I don't mean to be rude or insulting at all, but do feel that the behaviour exhibited by your parents is part of the "spectrum" of emotional disorders that are all too ill-defined, or conversely, so over defined, that the mere mention of it (e.g. depression) and everyone seemingly nods and knows exactly what you intended. Of course, as we now know, depression differs by type, duration, disability and all sorts of co-existing labels such as MDD, dysphoria, Bi-polar, Uni-polar etc. With or without delerium, dissociation, anxiety, panic etc. etc. And possibly so to BPD!

I also feel similarly about the BPD label, there are so many variations on the theme that to categorise every individual presentation would be unworkable, but that there is a "spectrum" or "matrice" of criteria relevant to BPD, but this need not necessarily be prescriptive of the presence or absence of BPD. The label, in my current view, could only really be considered by a psychiatrist in concert with a well known patient who exhibits BPD behaviour, thinking and emotional dysregulation over a period of time.

The point is this. That at some time in nearly everyone's life, they're going to get angry, yell at someone, say insulting things without regard for the hurt, act in ways that are detrimental to their own well being, and cry out loud if they so choose to do so. So, perhaps this is the point where BPD and the so called 'normo's' separate company. The normo's quicly return to the usual paterns of acceptable behaviour, but those with BPD, or BPD tendencies, find it extremely difficult (impossible?) to shut down their over active nervous systems, and thus the extreme behaviour and thinking continues. What we see in BPD then, is the outward manifestation of internal anxiety. AND this is the part I believe (just a personal opinion) that has strong biological foundations rather than environmental or socially learned cues.


"Each of us is wired with our own individual set of abilities and strengths, as well as weaknesses and we deal with things in the way that works for us at the time, whether it's healthy or not in the end."

I completely agree with you here, I also believe that BPD's are doing the best they can at any given point in time to meet their needs in ways they know how. This is why it is so pointless goal setting setting with BPD's. When they're in a meltdown, they do not have very much control over what they do or say.

I have also felt the heavy hand of unhinged mild psychosis where very strong "p . . .d" and "s . . . .d" ideations will not subside and then dominate my existence constraining social functioning. Last year I was totally 'non-compus-mentus" - I had absolutely no idea where I was, who I was, didn't recognise familiar people, places, couldn't walk straight, or even make a cup of tea. It was just horrible, and at the time I didn't have the thinking or language skills to explain how I was feeling. It was really really frightening to be feeling so disonnected from reality, and not be able to express myself.

Very very frightening to lose cognitive executive function . . . . especially for me! Anyway last big episode was late 2007, and just recently felt myself sliding into the abys again, and running out of options with my psychologist and lovely new GP, found myself returning to the 'lady shrink'. Now I'm functioning again, not brilliantly mind you, but at least I'm functiioning.



Opps, completely off topic again. Somebody slap me on the wrist - quickly!

The biology: I recently discovered that my estranged mother and 3 of her 4 siblings have all been hospitalised at some stage in their lives for mental health issues, and their Dx was Borderline Personality. My mother was also assessed for 'schizophrenia', but turned out to be 'schitzotypal or schotzoid' - gosh I can't recall now. Anyway the point is that there is a positive family history for mental health issues on both sides of my family. Fathers side is depression, mothers side 'personality'. So it is no wonder that when I do go downhill, I swim like a rock - free falling straight to the bottom usually -, without any prospect of self recovery. So, I again reach out to medical people I barely know and ask for their assistance. . . . . . . . but sometimes it can take quite a while before I reallise I'm in really really bad shape.

"I believe that although negative in many cases, my coping skills are what saved my life after a traumatic and abusive childhood."

Yeahh! Isn't this interesting! I'm really really glad that your coping skills saved your life too. I could really identify with your statement here. Like you, I also had an "unconventional childhood" (that's my new expression (lol . . .) for all the things you mentioned earlier + some more), but also feel that I've been incredibly lucky too, because many people who've been through what you and I have, are living lives of absolute chaos and desolation as a result.

I've discussed this common outcome briefly with another lady freind whose been through the 'unconventional childhood' too, (she's a psych nurse) and her story is so so familiar also. She has minor meltdowns from time to time, has a lovely husband, 3 great kids etc etc. . . .but from time to time just begins to go downhill. Her strategy is to be very very kind to herself when she begins to feel overwhellmed, takes things slowly, her hubby understands the history of abuse too. I don't know if there is a biological link in her family, but I do vaguely recall her saying the mum was quite ill for most of her childhood years.

[COLOR="Blue"]So, are we products of our biological destiny at conecption?
Or, are we what society and environment make us to be?
Or, possibly some combination of the two, with the more powerful influence providing greater weight? hmmmmmm . . . . . .????[/COLOR]

Just my two & a half cents here though...I'm interested in differing opinions. I have A LOT to say on this subject and could go on for hours. [/QUOTE]

"Yeah - please talk away all you like because talking about BPD is very interesting for mee tooo!"
Its' just so so good to talk about these things with other like minded self-confessed crazies too. . . . lol. . . . . .


Regards to all, and keep well as best you can, share your views on BPD and get on the boards when you're feeling _______________. (insert your favourite here)

Best wishes, waratah

Last edited by waratah; 09-22-2008 at 03:45 AM. Reason: warning warning long post

 
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