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creekwalker 05-03-2002 06:27 AM

Apiphobia
 
I have what is probably a pretty common phobia. Bees, any kind, and horseflies scare the heck out of me. I got stung once when I was little by a honey bee on my hand, and once as a teenager by 2 yellow jackets(one went down my shirt and stung me on the back and the other stung me on the leg). Ever since, I totally panic when they are near. I go to the creek often and I'm always running and screaming at least once each time. I carry a stick whenever I'm out because my biggest fear is that they'll land on my back and sting me when I don't know they're there. So, I hold the stick up against my back and swing it side to side so nothing will land there. I love being outside and this is really hard to deal with. There are times when I've gone out, only to leave because I feel all the bees are after me. I always run and have never been stung by running, but everyone just tells me to stand still. I tried that once and got stung by standing still, so I'm not doing that again. I've also heard that they can't sting you when you hold your breath. Is that true? Whenever a bee comes along now, I hold my breath and RUN! How can I get over this? I really go into a panic whenever I see one and everyone always laughs at me. How would they treat this, I wonder? Thanks Diana

Zafu 05-03-2002 08:48 AM

Hi Diana,

It's a shame you have a problem with bees as they are pretty cool..we'd be worse off without them! Did you know that if a bee stings you, it dies? The sting is an integral part of it's anatomy and it leaves it behind fatally. Bees normally won't attack humans unless threatened - you must have seen pictures of people covered in bees unharmed....

I don't think holding your breath will make a lot of difference, frankly. If you try and ignore a bee it will nearly always just quietly carry on with it's business.

Wasps on the other hand are nasty little swines..... even I tend to run a mile when they start ganging up on me...! But even wasps won't attack unless they feel in danger.

I certainly think that if you move calmly away from the insect involved you have less chance of being stung than if you start waving sticks or your hands about.

I know it's difficult to be rational when you are panicking but if you can try and be cool with them it could make a difference to your enjoyment of your outdoor activities.

Best wishes

Zafu [img]http://www.healthboards.com/ubb/clown.gif[/img]

creekwalker 05-05-2002 05:05 AM

Thanks for your suggestions, but you don't understand. It seems like bees and stinging creatures actually go after me. Honestly. I eat a lot of sweets and have wondered about this. I do try to mind my own business and ignore them, but, they hover right in my face. Inches from it, and the horseflies like to land on my back and bite me. Or they zoom endlessly in circles around me. I don't wave the stick wildly, just calmly back and forth against my back. It has helped a great deal doing this and they seem to leave me alone more. But, it gets tiring after awhile and there are a few that just don't want to let me go on my way. I am usually walking in the water when this happens and I know they don't have nests in the water, so I think they are doing it on purpose. I knew that bees die after they sting, but it still doesn't stop them from doing so. Anyway, thanks for your encouragement, but I just don't know how to get over this. Diana

DarkStar 03-27-2007 10:18 PM

Re: Apiphobia
 
[SIZE="1"][/SIZE][QUOTE=creekwalker;404527]Thanks for your suggestions, but you don't understand. It seems like bees and stinging creatures actually go after me. Honestly. I eat a lot of sweets and have wondered about this. I do try to mind my own business and ignore them, but, they hover right in my face. Inches from it, and the horseflies like to land on my back and bite me. Or they zoom endlessly in circles around me. I don't wave the stick wildly, just calmly back and forth against my back. It has helped a great deal doing this and they seem to leave me alone more. But, it gets tiring after awhile and there are a few that just don't want to let me go on my way. I am usually walking in the water when this happens and I know they don't have nests in the water, so I think they are doing it on purpose. I knew that bees die after they sting, but it still doesn't stop them from doing so. Anyway, thanks for your encouragement, but I just don't know how to get over this. Diana[/QUOTE]

[B][SIZE="2"]I can tell you, "for a fact" that holding your breath "does work". Most bees and wasps can't sting you while holding your breath...with a couple of exceptions...Bumble Bees and Hornets! Red wasps are also iffy.

I have seen my Grandfather, "many times", walk up to a trapped wasp and pluck it out of a window and show it to us kids. If we wanted it, he would remove the stinger and hand it to us. He explained it like this. When you breathe...the pores in your skin also breathe. When you hold your breath your pores close and it becomes hard for a stinger to penetrate the skin. Bumblebees and hornets have stronger muscles attached to their stinger so they can force the stinger into the pore more easily.

If you wish to test this fact without too much pain...try it with the small Sweat Bee. The next time one lands on your arm or wrist...hold your breath
and press lightly on the bee with your finger. He will buzz around underneath your finger until you take a breath...then he will sting you. It doesn't hurt bad ...kind of like a mosquito bite...but it will prove the point.

I can tell you other stories that I have personally witnessed, and things that I have learned about bees and wasps from my Grandfather. I have seen him walk up to a wasp nest and pluck it off an old shed with his hands and give it to us kids. He could make the wasps scatter away from him before he actually
took it down...but there is more to it, so don't just try that expecting positive results. There's a little known secret to it...called human sweat! Some smaller bees are attracted to it...but "wasps detest it". In the heat of summer...if he had been working and was sweaty he would rub his hands under his arm pits to pick up the sweat and extend his hands out in front of the nest. They would scatter in all directions.:) I'm not sure he would have wanted me to have told everyone that... but he said it is the concentrated human pherimone that the hate and will depart from.

If a bee does land on you...don't slap it. Just hold your breath and wave it away with your hand.

It is hard to hold your breath when you run though.[/SIZE][/B]


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