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Old 07-13-2008, 10:00 PM   #1
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Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

I was a member of this board several years ago and appreciated all the help that I received at that time.

In the subsequent years, my health continued to decline. Other people I knew suffered from thyroid disease seemed to be much healthier than me. They were able to work, go to school, and live life.

I continued to have odd symptoms including:
low TSH, low T3, low T4
intermittent high blood pressure,
crumbling teeth,
drooping eyelids,
swollen tongue
extreme joint and bone pain,
muscle weakness,
hearing loss,
intermittent vision loss,
vertigo,
cellulitis, plantar fascitis,
insomnia,
red/pink/white stretch marks across stomach and breasts
couldn't sleep enough
apathy, anxiety and depression.

I saw endocrinologists, ENT's, internal medicine doctors, family doctors, psychiatrists, therapists, and none could help me.

TSH, T3, T4 and sodium and potassium levels changed all the time.
When the doctors got my levels where they wanted them---I felt like I was dying. When I got my levels to where I liked them---the doctors would get mad and tell me that I was lying about how I felt---and wanted to be "hopped up" on thyroid meds so I could lose weight.

My stomach swelled by more than four inches overnight.
In two days, I gained 11 lbs.
In one month, I gained 40 lbs.

Six months later, I saw a mystery diagnosis show and realized that one of the patients featured had similar symptoms to mine.

I believed I had Cushings---or hypercortisolim.

My internist at the time agreed that I had symptoms of Cushings---but told me that it was a rare disease and that I most likely didn't have it, but she agreed to allow me one test: the dexamethasone test. It's used to check to see if your Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis was working.
I "suppressed" and it was determined on that one test---that I did not have Cushings.

I continued to get sicker and and sicker. I couldn't walk to the mailbox---walking to the bathroom was hard enough---I was constantly running into things.

I eventually changed doctors---actually, like other doctors before her---my internist kicked me out of her office---insisting that my problems were psychiatric in nature. Psychiatrists insisted that I had endocrine problems.

After four visits to the ER with an extreme case of orbital cellulitis---a helpful ER doctor agreed that I had all the symptoms of Cushings and encouraged me to see a specialist out of state.

I checked around and found out that Oregon had a well respected Pituitary center---with specialists who knew how hard it was to dx pituitary disease, Cushings and other unusual neuroendocrine diseases.

After more than five days of non-stop testing, an MRI, and a consultation with the doctor, I was dx'd with Secondary Hypothyroidism. The solution: I needed more thyroid than I was getting. The specialist insisted that my local endocrinologist would treat me. I returned home and immediately saw my local endocrinologist.

Instead of agreeing with the tests and doctors, she insisted that I was lying about what the specialist in Oregon said---and when I showed her the report from the hospital, I was kicked out of her office.

This was the third doctor's office I had been kicked out of in four years.
My family started doubting me. I continued to get sicker and sicker.

I tried to contact my doctor in Oregon to report that my local endo had refused treatment they had recommended. I did not hear back from them.

After trying to get a local doctor to help me, I ended up going to Los Angeles---a 1,000 mile flight---that I could ill afford. In less than six months and $30,000 (thankfully insurance paid most of it), I was off to see if another doctor could help me.

On January 4, 2006, I saw the most amazing doctor. He listened to me, tested me---I had another MRI that showed that my tumor had compressed my pituitary, and ordered additional tests from what I had had in Oregon.

In less than a week, I finally got the information I needed to know. In addition to having secondary hypothyroidism, I also had growth hormone deficiency, and in less than a month, I was contacted by a pharmaceutical company that helped me get set up for that.

In the meantime, my L.A. doctor told me that my Hashimoto's had basically destroyed most of my thyroid, he increased my thyroid meds, he prescribed growth hormone replacement, estrogen replacement (patch---not oral estrogen which is a "no-no"), and more...

I immediately felt better. But I had some hard times. I could finally walk---but my legs felt like rubber. It took my insurance company more than 6 months to ok my growth hormone replacement. They did not know enough about the tests to know that they had been given all the information and tests results that my contract required.

About this time last year, I started on growth hormone---and I finally started to feel like myself for the first time in more than 10 years.

Suddenly, most of my symptoms disappeared. I still am being tested for Cushings, but I am able to do some things for the first time.

Sorry this is a long post. I found out that doctors are not familiar with pituitary disease. In fact, it was thought that pituitary disease was "rare"---along with a bunch of other things---but it isn't.

The hardest thing about my disease has been finding a doctor who knew what they were doing.

I started out thinking that my problem was simply thyroid problems---and it was---but it was more complicated. And as I read your posts, I see many of you experiencing similar problems.

I hope this helps. Like I said---I was a member of this board many years ago---and it helped me to keep digging for answers.

I hope you all find the help and the answers you need.

 
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Old 07-14-2008, 04:32 AM   #2
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Congratulations on never giving up!! i'm so glad you feel better and that you are improving. Don't you just want to go to those doctors who kicked you out of their offices and rub your results in their faces!!!!!

My symptoms and health did not get as serious as yours, but i can understand the doctor "merry-go-round" you went through as i have experienced enough of that to last me a life time. Admittedly i've never been kicked out of a doctor's office, but if they'd tried i think i would have been a decent aim with the stapler

If you had not taken a gamble and gone to LA imagine where you would be now!! In this day and age we shouldn't have to go to such lengths and distances to find a decent doctor, but unfortunately a number of us have had to do that. This is why i tell people if they have exhausted their supply of doctors in their home town and surrounding area they should seriously consider towns/cities/states far and wide. Your health is most important and travel distance shouldn't be placed above your health.

I hope you continue to improve and be an inspiration to those who are only just starting out in search of answers

 
Old 07-14-2008, 08:29 AM   #3
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

T4T3,

THANK-YOU for sharing. I have been in your shoes to some degree. You are not alone. There are too many of us that are suffering in silence, because getting competent care is like getting water out of rocks. I got the Hashimoto's identified by the antibody tests, after five years of being sent to every specialist in the book trying to treat the individual hypoT symptoms I had.. then after finally having a source identified I still had to go through 5 more MDs to get treated because my TSH was NORMAL. I bet you love that word too.

Well after finding an MD wiling to work with me things began to fall in line. My symptoms had a source.. or sources and it was a matter of proper testing to identifiy them.

Swallowing and throat pain.. got my MD to order an ultrasound - and even though my Endo said your thyroid is normal there was a single nodule and chronic thyroid inflammation due to my thousands of antibodies stomping it to death.

Fatigue and all the classic hypoT issues.. Low T4 and T3 and TSH. So I was secondary hypoT.. but my old MDs only focused on the TSH, until I got in with Dr. J.

I thought I was cruising across that finish line.. I was taking my T4 supplement and things seemed to get better then WHAM down hill slide. Couldn't wake up, fatigue got worse, heart issues.. well turns out I have Graves too, my thyroid antibodies were attacking my brain, AND my adrenal glands were off with the dodos. All rare conditions that my Endo told me I couldn't have at the age of 32. But the spinal fluid results and MRI and CTs and blood work do not lie. Now I ride the hyperT/hypoT roller coaster. I live with fluxing T3 toxicosis and as a T4 hypoT. I have to treat my primary adrenal insufficiency.. which made that fatigue take a dirt nap... and I have to watch my neurological issues in addition to my thyroid levels religiously.

You can not give up if you are at high risk for having a thyroid issue and you have symptoms. You can not trust your MD to be looking out for your best interest. Most MDs are crunching and munching the symptoms and working on probabilities. They will treat the most obvious symptoms.. pat you on the head and send you on your way. Most MDs do not work to find the source of your issues until you have suffered needlessly. Now IF you show back bone and tell them heck no test for this and this.. then they get a bit bent out of shape and may boot you out the door. But there are plenty of MDs out there.

The things that have helped me the most are people on this board, researching out the waz, and a family of silent thyroid sufferers that have been sufferring for 20+ years. I found out quickly I wasn't alone and now.. well we call and gripe to each other and have our personal thyroid and MD phone slam sessions.

So if you think you have a thyroid condition, don't take NORMAL for an answer. Get a copy of your labs and make sure they are testing thoroughly. NORMAL is not always optimal. The normal range is based on an Optimal range established using males in the age range of 25-40. This tells them that 85% of men with out thyroid antibodies or a family history of thyroid issues have a TSH in the .89-1.1 and FT3 and ft4 levels balanced in the 50-80% of normal range.

Now where does this leave women.. well we have to fight to get there and stay there too!
1) Start with a solid data basis and test the following blood work: TSH, FT3, FT4, and antibodies.
2) Make sure you keep a detailed symptom log note how you are being affected morning, noon, and night.
3) Make sure you keep diet and exercise logs. Look over your medications and their side effects.. and last but not least... look at your family history. CALL and talk to everyone. Some will not share, feeling ashamed or embarassed by their condition. My mother and her sisters prefered not to bother their children witht the Hashi's/Graves Hades they lived in.. well this is fine while the child is in elementary school and Jr. High.. but once they hit high school and risk levels rise you should tell them what to look out for... you should also make yearly antibody testing a part of the yearly physical routine if you have a family history of thyroid issues.

I didn't know and floundered through a pregnancy from Hades and then another 5 years before a light bulb went off and I thought to force my MDs to look at more than the TSH. So as you have shown T4t3 YOU have to listen to your body and be confident in yourself. It is your body and your life. You must being willing to fight for yourself no matter what.

I hope others can learn from our mistakes so that they can bypass them and start living again sooner.
I am wishing you the best of luck and a speedy recovery T4T3. I am trying to get in to the head of my states pituitary/thyroid/adrenal research center. Right now my IM is trying to work the referral and I am holding my breathe in the mean time.

You should share your MDs name so the west coast sufferers can share in your good fortune. I can not thank Dr. Natalie Johnson of Chattanooga TN enough for working with me and letting me assist in the navigation of my thyroid care.

Sincerely,
MG
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If we learn by our mistakes, I am working on one hell of an education.

 
Old 07-14-2008, 11:51 AM   #4
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Wow!!!
You are the first person I've met who had the issues of anti-bodies attacking their brain!!! I've read about it---and wondered about it---I definitely keep my eyes open and do all I can when I come up against a weird symptom.

I totally agree with you about the MD's crunching symptoms and probabilities---the message I kept getting was those diseases were "rare"---and then they asked me why I would want a rare disease? What!? I didn't want a rare disease---I just wanted to be properly dx'd if I did have one---and get the treatment I needed!

Doctor bashing used to be one of my hobbies---thankfully now I have more to do---but I have to decided to try and share my story with others---on this forum and others---so that they don't have to suffer as long as myself and others have.

Your advice regarding keeping records, tracking symptoms, etc., is great!!! That information will definitely help you get to the bottom of things---and keep you from thinking you're crazy!

I hope you get into your pituitary/thyroid/adrenal research center soon. It seems that more and more medical schools are pursuing research and treatment of HPA disease---I hope your get your referral soon. (I was repeatedly denied a referral, then finally a general practice doctor who thought it was stupid that I could not get checked out, if I really thought I was sick---gave me the referral I needed. Within four months of me going to see the specialist, that gp was fired. I wonder if him giving me the referral was a part of the reason he got fired).

I wasn't sure if we could mention names or not---I went to Dr. Theodore Friedman in Los Angeles---and he has done more for me in a short amount of time than any doctor I've ever seen.

Good luck to those of you who are still suffering---I hope you find good doctors who can help you live the best life you can!

 
Old 07-15-2008, 11:03 AM   #5
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Hi t4t3hell,

Congratulations on finding your answer. I too have a very rare disorder that affects the pituitary/thyroid axis. It causes secondary hyperthyroidism but there's some hypo thrown in too to make things even more interesting. Took me 25 years, not counting the time as a child with my mom taking me to docs on a regular basis, without any answer to find a doctor willing to listen and look. I'm finally on my way to feeling better but all those years of having doctor's turn there back on me really took it's toll. Hopefully by posting what you did, others will not have to suffer thru what you did.

I'm glad you shared your experience. It gives many the incentive to pursue looking for an answer for what they know isn't right. You're quite an inspiration.

 
Old 07-15-2008, 09:25 PM   #6
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

I should be thanking YOU!!!
It sounds like you have a very complex set of issues---and you've been at it longer than me...

It stinks to be ignored---and dismissed---and labeled as a crazy attention seeker---yeah, the last people I want to hang around with are doctors!!!!

It's funny---as "rare" as all of this is supposed to be---I have a neighbor/acquaintance I've known for 30 years---and just recently I found out that her "mystery" symptoms were due to a pituitary tumor, I have another acquaintance/neighbor---who's sister-in-law had pituitary cancer---had to have her pit. removed about 20 years ago, and our auto mechanic has adrenal tumors and his sister-in-law has Cushings!

I live in a relatively small state---about 1.5 million in the whole state---and all these people live/work within 1.25 miles of me.

Thanks for your reply---I'd love to know more about your problems---I have friends who are constantly seeking answers.

Never heard of Greasy Rock---grandparents lived in Jackson---dad lived in Memphis...

 
Old 07-16-2008, 05:25 AM   #7
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Actually it's a pretty simple issue. It's a defect in one of the thyroid hormone receptors. Takes a much higher level of thyroid hormones before certain target tissues respond, the pituitary being one of them. I run around with normal to high TSH levels with high thyroid hormone levels and a pituitary that doesn't exactly listen too well or know exactly when to shut off. Just the opposite of you. It's called resistance to thyroid hormone. There's only two primary conditions that can cause those kinds of readings. This and a pituitary adenoma that secretes TSH and I don't have an adenoma. Some people with it are primarily hyper, some are mostly hypo and some are all but euthyroid but they all have the same lab anomaly regardless of their symptoms. It's a matter of an individual's pattern of receptors and how the body responds to it.

I'm not so against doctors per se. Specialists are a different matter. It's been the gp's and internists who've had the kind of common sense to help me out over the years by controlling the symptoms. The one I've got now is great. He's talked to some thyroidologists at conferences and did a lot of research on it. He's going by the book and actually treating it. A very simple set of instructions but golly, gee whiz, what is so difficult about looking at a set of labs and listening to the patient and then looking it up??? Well duh! So what if it's rare. If it exists, someone has to have it. Mines 1:40,000 live births. When you start crunching numbers, there's an awful lot of us out there.

I know two people with cushing's just in this little rural county (around 6,000 people). One of them I know for sure is under the care of my gp after she spent years going to specialists. He's a doctor who likes to find answers. Good thing too cause he's the only doctor here. I'm at the opposite end of the state from memphis. The county seat's actually called sneedville. It was changed from greasy rock. Most people like the name greasy rock better. It's got a certain sound of class, don't ya think?

Anyhow, I do know how you feel. Having that answer in hand after so many years is an incredible feeling. Brings a sense of peace where you know you can finally start getting down to the business of fixing it and start getting on with your life. Also makes you wanna reach out and make sure no one else has to go thru it too. I think your coming back here and sharing your experience is great. It's going to help a lot of people.

 
Old 07-16-2008, 09:44 AM   #8
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

I've heard of the thyroid receptor problem---but have never met anyone who had it.
Congratulations to you and your doctor for figuring things out!!! I agree with you---when you finally find out what it is---there is a sense of relief---at least now you know what you are fighting against.
It's cool how your doctor did so much research to figure out things!!! What a keeper!!! My experience was the opposite---local doctors got tired of me---and lots of them made mistakes---just like the doctor that had treated me for years, but who got ran out of town. I think he got ran out of town in part because he took on the harder cases. I know I saw him for nearly 14 years---and he helped keep me "functional" for many years.
My husband's brother and sister-in-law lived in Knoxville for a time----so we made the drive from Memphis to Jackson and Knoxville---very pretty---and we loved the exit to Bucksnort!
I've never lived in Tennessee---but have fond memories...
Hope you are well---and congratulations for helping others!!!
Wish Oprah, Montel, Dr. Phil would have some folks on who have weird diseases---so others can be helped...
Take care!

 
Old 07-16-2008, 03:47 PM   #9
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

I know of a couple people with it but haven't been able to make contact.

The doc had the university run a medline search and then asked for my research papers. I don't think he was expecting quite the data dump he got but darned if he didn't read it. He said it made great bedtime reading. This is after he finished his nightly house calls. He's a keeper allright. But actually the first doc who mentioned it was an internist back in '93. He said he'd read an article and was sure it was what I had. I'd been seeing him for about a year. He gave me a script for the beta blockers which is the recommended treatment and then he said he was moving to jackson and I had to find another doctor. I found a gp willing to keep me in betas but as he put it I knew more about it than he did. He was about 2 hours away. I went local when I found a breast lump and had heard the fnp at the local clinic was really good and I was tired of traveling. When my thyroid hormone results went across the gp's desk, I got a call that he wanted to see me in person.

Ah, have you ever heard a buck snort? They do, you know. Wind your way northeast up into the mountains about 2 hours from knoxville and you'll run into us.

I've got a little ways to go on feeling good. We're still adjusting the hormones but it's getting there. Also, due to the incompetence of some of the "specialists" I've managed to develop diabetes, renal tubular acidosis and osteoporosis all attributable to the long period of untreated thryotoxicosis. He's got his work cut out for him.

I'm going to help though. I decided to go back to school and have started on my way to a degree as a medical assistant. I figure if you can't beat em, you may as well join em.

 
Old 07-16-2008, 05:01 PM   #10
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Hey T4T3hell,

Thanks for sharing your experience with us. I am interested in this doctor of yours in L.A. I live in Utah, so I'm not too far away. My in-laws also live near there so we have occasion to visit.

I'm quickly exhausting my resources of doctors around here and am desperate to try almost anything.

What type of doctor is he...an endo?

 
Old 07-16-2008, 08:00 PM   #11
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Yes---he's an endo.
He teaches and does research---and suffers from Hashimoto's---so he knows what it's like to deal with some of this.
Do a search for Theodore Friedman---he's written a book and appeared on a health special called "The Science of Obesity".
He did more for me in one visit---than others had done in years. I'm sure it helped that he had most of the pieces of the puzzle---but he's a very, very smart guy.

I've also heard good things about Dr. Jack Wahlen, I think in Ogden. The persons I've heard from had Cushings---so I don't know if that helps or hurts.

I was told about Dr. F. from patients in New York City, Virginia, and other places. I know lots of people who've traveled across country just to see him---and I yet to hear anything negative about the guy---he doesn't abandon you.

Hope that helps!
PS: I was encouraged to go to UofU---and I know some folks who've gotten some help down there---but by the time I made my appointment---I couldn't take anymore chances...I was on my last legs.

 
Old 07-16-2008, 10:37 PM   #12
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Wow, thanks for all that info. My neighbor goes to Jack Wahlen and really likes him, but she doesn't have a very complicated case. I've thought about going to him. My insurance isn't accepted at the U of U, but it probably wouldn't be accepted by the L.A doc either. Oh well, I don't really care at this point. I'll pay anything to get my life back.

Well, I have an appointment with someone down in Orem that is a D.O. and is supposed to be good with hormones. The problem is, the appointment isn't until October. If that doesn't work out I am going to seriously consider seeing this guy in L.A. Did you have to wait long to get an appointment?

 
Old 07-17-2008, 05:32 AM   #13
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Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

Quote:
Originally Posted by T4T3hell View Post
I was a member of this board several years ago and appreciated all the help that I received at that time.

In the subsequent years, my health continued to decline. Other people I knew suffered from thyroid disease seemed to be much healthier than me. They were able to work, go to school, and live life.

I continued to have odd symptoms including:
low TSH, low T3, low T4
intermittent high blood pressure,
crumbling teeth,
drooping eyelids,
swollen tongue
extreme joint and bone pain,
muscle weakness,
hearing loss,
intermittent vision loss,
vertigo,
cellulitis, plantar fascitis,
insomnia,
red/pink/white stretch marks across stomach and breasts
couldn't sleep enough
apathy, anxiety and depression.

I saw endocrinologists, ENT's, internal medicine doctors, family doctors, psychiatrists, therapists, and none could help me.

TSH, T3, T4 and sodium and potassium levels changed all the time.
When the doctors got my levels where they wanted them---I felt like I was dying. When I got my levels to where I liked them---the doctors would get mad and tell me that I was lying about how I felt---and wanted to be "hopped up" on thyroid meds so I could lose weight.

My stomach swelled by more than four inches overnight.
In two days, I gained 11 lbs.
In one month, I gained 40 lbs.

Six months later, I saw a mystery diagnosis show and realized that one of the patients featured had similar symptoms to mine.

I believed I had Cushings---or hypercortisolim.

My internist at the time agreed that I had symptoms of Cushings---but told me that it was a rare disease and that I most likely didn't have it, but she agreed to allow me one test: the dexamethasone test. It's used to check to see if your Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal (HPA) axis was working.
I "suppressed" and it was determined on that one test---that I did not have Cushings.

I continued to get sicker and and sicker. I couldn't walk to the mailbox---walking to the bathroom was hard enough---I was constantly running into things.

I eventually changed doctors---actually, like other doctors before her---my internist kicked me out of her office---insisting that my problems were psychiatric in nature. Psychiatrists insisted that I had endocrine problems.

After four visits to the ER with an extreme case of orbital cellulitis---a helpful ER doctor agreed that I had all the symptoms of Cushings and encouraged me to see a specialist out of state.

I checked around and found out that Oregon had a well respected Pituitary center---with specialists who knew how hard it was to dx pituitary disease, Cushings and other unusual neuroendocrine diseases.

After more than five days of non-stop testing, an MRI, and a consultation with the doctor, I was dx'd with Secondary Hypothyroidism. The solution: I needed more thyroid than I was getting. The specialist insisted that my local endocrinologist would treat me. I returned home and immediately saw my local endocrinologist.

Instead of agreeing with the tests and doctors, she insisted that I was lying about what the specialist in Oregon said---and when I showed her the report from the hospital, I was kicked out of her office.

This was the third doctor's office I had been kicked out of in four years.
My family started doubting me. I continued to get sicker and sicker.

I tried to contact my doctor in Oregon to report that my local endo had refused treatment they had recommended. I did not hear back from them.

After trying to get a local doctor to help me, I ended up going to Los Angeles---a 1,000 mile flight---that I could ill afford. In less than six months and $30,000 (thankfully insurance paid most of it), I was off to see if another doctor could help me.

On January 4, 2006, I saw the most amazing doctor. He listened to me, tested me---I had another MRI that showed that my tumor had compressed my pituitary, and ordered additional tests from what I had had in Oregon.

In less than a week, I finally got the information I needed to know. In addition to having secondary hypothyroidism, I also had growth hormone deficiency, and in less than a month, I was contacted by a pharmaceutical company that helped me get set up for that.

In the meantime, my L.A. doctor told me that my Hashimoto's had basically destroyed most of my thyroid, he increased my thyroid meds, he prescribed growth hormone replacement, estrogen replacement (patch---not oral estrogen which is a "no-no"), and more...

I immediately felt better. But I had some hard times. I could finally walk---but my legs felt like rubber. It took my insurance company more than 6 months to ok my growth hormone replacement. They did not know enough about the tests to know that they had been given all the information and tests results that my contract required.

About this time last year, I started on growth hormone---and I finally started to feel like myself for the first time in more than 10 years.

Suddenly, most of my symptoms disappeared. I still am being tested for Cushings, but I am able to do some things for the first time.

Sorry this is a long post. I found out that doctors are not familiar with pituitary disease. In fact, it was thought that pituitary disease was "rare"---along with a bunch of other things---but it isn't.

The hardest thing about my disease has been finding a doctor who knew what they were doing.

I started out thinking that my problem was simply thyroid problems---and it was---but it was more complicated. And as I read your posts, I see many of you experiencing similar problems.

I hope this helps. Like I said---I was a member of this board many years ago---and it helped me to keep digging for answers.

I hope you all find the help and the answers you need.
Im so happy you finally found someone to listen and take the time out to help you... Im also so happy you are on your journey of recovery.. May each day keep getting better for you.

 
Old 07-17-2008, 10:40 AM   #14
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Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Posts: 78
talbet0729 HB User
Re: Beyond Hashi's: Secondary Hypothyroidism/Pituitary Disease

I just looked on my insurance and he is covered by my insurance. Maybe it is time to plan a trip to sunny California!

 
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