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Old 10-20-2007, 05:55 PM   #1
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C-ptsd

Dear readers,

Has anyone been diagnosed with C-PTSD (Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) ?

It is being considered for inclusion in the DSM-V, which is due to be published in 2012.

This is new to me and now I am obsessing about it.

Take care.

Phoenix
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Old 10-25-2007, 05:02 AM   #2
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Re: C-ptsd

I see that no one has been diagnosed with C-PTSD.

Symptoms will be posted shortly.

Phoenix
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Last edited by Phoenix; 10-25-2007 at 05:02 AM.

 
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Old 10-26-2007, 01:16 PM   #3
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Re: C-ptsd

Sorry Ryan i do not know or even ever heard of c-ptsd.
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Old 11-01-2007, 02:12 AM   #4
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Re: C-ptsd

C PTSD results from extended exposure to prolonged social and/or interpersonal trauma, including instances of physical, emotional and sexual abuse; domestic violence, torture, chronic early maltreatment in a caregiving relationship, and war.

psychological fragmentation, the loss of a sense of safety, trust, and self-worth, as well as the tendency to be revictimized, along with the loss of a coherent sense of self. This loss of self, and the ensuing the symptoms aforementioned differentiates C-PTSD from PTSD.

Take care.

Phoenix
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Old 11-14-2007, 03:53 PM   #5
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Re: C-ptsd

hi
i hace been diagnosed with c-ptsd, i hadnt a clue what it was until i read up on it, i didnt understand how a dr could say i had ptsd when i had suffered for so long before the big, big incident, as it was only then that i spoke out about it! he explained the "c" complex, makes a big difference, its prolonged suffering and abuse, not one specific incident.
i now suspect my children also have this condition as i see the same actions and traits as i have myself, they were also victims. i am waiting for a diagnosis of them but i dont know how i will cope, trying to help them when i cant cope myself.

 
Old 11-14-2007, 07:30 PM   #6
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Re: C-ptsd

i have that definitely. any new stressor is like a tidal wave hitting me straight on! not officially diagnosed though.

 
Old 11-15-2007, 01:00 AM   #7
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Re: C-ptsd

Quote:
Originally Posted by travinda View Post
hi
i have been diagnosed with c-ptsd, i hadnt a clue what it was until i read up on it, i didnt understand how a dr could say i had ptsd when i had suffered for so long before the big, big incident, as it was only then that i spoke out about it! he explained the "c" complex, makes a big difference, its prolonged suffering and abuse, not one specific incident.
i now suspect my children also have this condition as i see the same actions and traits as i have myself, they were also victims. i am waiting for a diagnosis of them but i dont know how i will cope, trying to help them when i cant cope myself.
Dear Travinda,

Having C-PTSD does not automatically disqualify you as not being able to cope; if your children have the disorder(or any other) I am sure that you will be prepared to take whatever measures possible to ensure that they are provided with adequate therapeutic intervention.

After all, that's what we do for our children if they need help, right?

I realize that it must have taken a lot for you to post here and I am glad that you did.

Phoenix
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Old 11-15-2007, 12:43 PM   #8
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Re: C-ptsd

Is there a reason between the seperation between the two? I mean does it qualify for a different type of treatment. I have an odd feeling I am not getting this clearly, right now I see it as PTSD with borderline tendencies is that on the right track?

take care
trg247
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Old 11-15-2007, 02:11 PM   #9
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Re: C-ptsd

T,

It is a variant of PTSD, usually those subject to long-term abuse or torture(ie-childhood,POW's and hostages) are the most likely to have these symptoms, which are numerous in number.
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Old 11-15-2007, 07:47 PM   #10
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Re: C-ptsd

I have C-PTSD from multiple childhood and adult traumas. The big difference to me is that with chronic PTSD there are significant biochemical and/or neurotransmitter changes that are permanent. I know that long-term therapy will help...but I also know that anti-depressants and anti-anxiety meds are also needed to stabilize my life.

I am very glad they have come up with this diagnostic category. My docs and therapists have come up with multiple possible diagnoses since I was a teenager. This diagnosis really fits me...FINALLY!

 
Old 11-16-2007, 01:25 AM   #11
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Re: C-ptsd

So when people are evaluated, will the doctor diagnose one or the other - ptsd or c-ptsd?

 
Old 11-17-2007, 10:06 AM   #12
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Re: C-ptsd

I don't know that it will be at the intial eval...but after a few visits it will probably be fairly easy to distinguish between the two.

I look at it like as a wonderful tool for clinicians to have. During the past 15 years, I have been throughly evaluated for the following:
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • PTSD
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Anorexia

The only diagnoses that have survived evaluation and the test of time are:
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • PTSD
  • Anorexia

The reason I was evaluated for BPD was my tendency to self-harm. With the diagnosis of C-PTSD, the self-harm behaviors I have tended to engage in make much more sense (I include my eating disorder as a form of self-harm).

I think that C-PTSD will help keep clinicians from having BPD be one of the first "go-to" diagnoses.

 
Old 11-17-2007, 10:46 AM   #13
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Re: C-ptsd

I think thats why this subject or "new" diagnosis criteria is a bit confusing.
I have multiple diagnosis
- Severe Major Depression Disorder with psycotic features
- Post Traumatic Stress Disorder stemming from long term abuse
- Borderline Personality Disorder, doctor refers to it as being a textbook level
- Generalized Anxiety Disorder

All have been confirmed over and over again, also managed to get labeled difficult at the same time but whatever, prefer difficult over untreatable which "they" have also used in the past

Maybe its the Borderline that is messing with my head here. I thought, wrongly apparently, that people with PTSD all had similar thought patterns through out common areas like trust and safety issues. I guess the other fear is people who have been labeled with ptsd are not going to be treated as well or aggressively because they are not c-ptsd if that makes any sense.

apparently still confused
take care
trg247
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Old 11-17-2007, 11:03 AM   #14
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Re: C-ptsd

Quote:
I think thats why this subject or "new" diagnosis criteria is a bit confusing.
I have multiple diagnosis
- Severe Major Depression Disorder with psycotic features
- Post Traumatic Stress Disorder stemming from long term abuse
- Borderline Personality Disorder, doctor refers to it as being a textbook level
- Generalized Anxiety Disorder

All have been confirmed over and over again, also managed to get labeled difficult at the same time but whatever, prefer difficult over untreatable which "they" have also used in the past

Maybe its the Borderline that is messing with my head here. I thought, wrongly apparently, that people with PTSD all had similar thought patterns through out common areas like trust and safety issues. I guess the other fear is people who have been labeled with ptsd are not going to be treated as well or aggressively because they are not c-ptsd if that makes any sense.
I don't think that you are wrong with the thought that people with PTSD have similar thought patterns in regards to areas like trust and safety. First, I think that the idea behind putting a new diagnostic category in the DSM-V is to help better treat patients...not exclude certain patients. Also, I think they are trying to decrease the "laundry list" of diagnoses we carry around. I do meet the qualifications for GAD, but the reason I have GAD is because of the permanent chemical changes in my brain from long-term trauma....so I tend to lump it in with my PTSD.

Since I have an eating disorder and am very familiar with the different categories there, maybe this will help put you mind at ease. In the DSM-IV, they included a category called "ED-NOS" or Eating Disorder-Not otherwise specified. Quite a few people were worried this would create a group of people who were not treated as aggressively. However, it has allowed people to get treatment for anorexic and/or bulimic tendicies before they get to the "official diagnostic criteria" for anorexia or bulimia.

I think that it will be a great tool for treating any patient with PTSD. Anytime the treatment team can get a clearer picture of what is going on and what treatments are best, the patients ultimately benefit. I think they are finding that traditional PTSD treatments don't work for a sub-set of PTSD patients, thus the creation of a new category. I don't think it will cause people with PTSD to receive a lowere standard of treatment, but will provide people with any form of PTSD to receive more tailored treatment.

Hope this helps!

 
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