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Old 02-11-2007, 09:00 AM   #1
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fusion77 HB User
??? about mri ???

hello everyone how ya all doin? i have a question regarding my mri film. the axial view where you see the disc on top, under that iks the spinal fluid surrounding the cord this is white and then you have the cord, then the foramina-the spine bone. im right so far right? well here's my question the disk is not supposed to be touching the spinalcord? what does it mean when the disc is deformed looking and is right on top of the spinal cord and the cord is right on the spine bone all of this is squashed together... WHAT DOES THIS MEAN??? i am pretty sure i know but wanted you guys to give your opinion. my ortho taught me how to read my films when i needed surgery the first time.... as to my knowledge there is suppossed to be a space betwen these parts, when the disk is touching the spinal bone on one side or the other it means that you have compression of a spinal nerve or both. the spinalcord in its sack is suppossed to have white around it this is the fluid it sits in.... well hope to here from you asap.

 
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Old 02-11-2007, 09:38 AM   #2
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Re: ??? about mri ???

You are correct, for the most part. The disk at the top of the axial image should not be in contact with the thecal sac -- the shield shaped white area that hosts the CSF and spinal cord at the cervical level. The foramina are actually the openings in the spine where the spinal nerves exit. The Laminae and the Spinous Processes are the bony structures at the posterior of the spine, with the Facet Joints appearing laterally on the posterior side of the Thecal Sac. The facet joints can experience overgrowth (hypertrophy), which can contribute to stenosis (narrowing of the foramina or the thecal sac). The ligament that runs adjacent to the spine can also become thickened, contributing to stenosis.

Only a NS can really tell you what it means, as what looks pretty dramatic to you or me can be termed "mild" by a NS or radiologist. If the MRI image shows contact with the cord, but the signal strength of the cord itself is undisturbed, then the situation is not as severe. Clearly, pressure on the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms. Check it out with your NS.

 
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