It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Spinal Cord Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-15-2012, 07:53 PM   #1
Member
(male)
 
Chitown2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 54
Chitown2012 HB User
MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Hello:

I'm new to this board. For the last 6 months I've been experiencing left had weakness. I can't open my left hand without using my right hand to force them open. I had an MRI taken and saw a nerosurgeon that said I need surgery and recommends a Laminoplasty. Before I decide I have an appointment with a neurologist to see if there are non-surgical options. I'd appreciate input as some of the terms in the MRI report are greek to me. Here is my MRI Report:

PROCEDURE: MR Spine Cervical WO Contrast

HISTORY: 53-year-old male with numbness and tingling of the left arm.

COMPARISON: None

TECHNIQUE: Sagittal T1, T2, STIR and axial 2D GRE and 3D T2-weighted images of the cervical spine were acquired.

FINDINGS: There is subtle reversal of the normal cervical lordosis. No abnormalities of alignment are identified. The vertebral body heights are maintained.

There is focal hypointense T1 and T2 signal involving the C6 vertebral body, which may represent an atypical hemangioma.

There is hyperintense T2/STIR signal involving the C7 and T1 endplates and vertebral bodies. Multilevel endplate marrow signal changes are noted including Modic type II change endplate changes at C3-4 and C5-6.

The cervical cord has a normal caliber. There are no areas of abnormal cord signal. No Masses or fluid collections are seen in the spinal canal or paravertebral soft tissues. The craniocervical junction is unremarkable.

Multilevel degenerative changes are indentified with diffuse degenerative disc desiccation and disc space narrowing, most prominent at C5-6.

The spinal canal is developmentally slender.

At C2-3, there is a small posterior disk osteophyte complex with mild bilateral uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes without significant spinal canal or neuroforaminal narrowing.

At C3-4, there is a moderate posterior disc osteophyte complex with mild bilateral uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes contributing to mild/moderate central canal stenosis with flattening of the ventral cord as well as moderate to severe left and severe right neural foraminal stenosis.

At C4-5, there is a moderate posterior disc osteophyte complex contributing to ventral cord deformity, as well as moderate right uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes contributing to moderate central canal stenosis as well as moderate right neural foraminal stenosis. There is no significant left neural foraminal stenosis.

At 5-6, there is a moderate posterior disc osteophyte complex with moderate bilateral uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes contributing to severe central canalstenosis with associated cord atrophy and myelomalacia, as well as moderate to severe bilateral neural foraminal stenosis.

At C6-7, there is a moderate posterior disc osteophyte complex with moderate uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes contributing to mild/moderate cental canal stenosis as well as moderate to severe bilateral neural foraminal stenosis.

At C7-T1, there is a small posterior disc osteophyte complex with moderate uncovertebral and facet degenerative changes contributing to mild central canal stenosis as well as moderate bilateral neural foraminal stenosis.

IMPRESSION:
1. Multilevel degenerative changes involving the cervical spine as detailed above, most prominent at C5-6 with severe central canal stenosis and associated cord atrophy and myelomalacia, as well as moderate to severe bilateral neural foraminal stenosis.

2. Hyperintense T2/STIR signal involving the C7-T1 endplates and vertebral bodies. While these could represent sequela of degenerative changes, early osteomyelitis/diskitis may have this appearance in the appropriate clinical sertting. Recommend correlation with prior MRI cervical spine examinations or correlation with CT scan of the cervical spine to assess for degenerative changes.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 001R.jpg (69.8 KB, 6 views)

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 01-15-2012, 10:09 PM   #2
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

I will respond tomorrow. In the meantime, you might want to read my thread called "Cervical Laminoplasty Chronicle" for some of the reasoning involved.

What levels does the doc want to do? Does he think that concurrent foraminotomies can take care of the foraminal stenosis?

 
Old 01-15-2012, 10:40 PM   #3
Member
(male)
 
Chitown2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 54
Chitown2012 HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

I'm seeing the neurosurgeon Tuesday 1/17 to get more specifics... don't know what levels yet...

 
Old 01-16-2012, 06:45 AM   #4
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Radiologists tend to use standard terminology, especially in the use of the adjectives minimal/mild/moderate/severe. So you can see that "moderate", which sounds innocuous, is only one step below "severe". For finer distinctions, a radiologist will often say something like "mild to moderate" to indicate an intermediate state.

More terminology...

Foramen/foramina - These are the holes in the bony structure of the spine through which pass the peripheral nerves as they leave the spinal cord and head out to the neck, shoulders and arms. When the foramina become occluded due to disk protrusions or due to osteoarthritis of the surrounding bone, the nerve roots can be impinged upon and function abnormally ("radiculopathy" - meaning "problem with the root"). This can affect outgoing signals - causing motor dysfunction - and incoming signals - causing false readings such as tingling and pain to be sent to the brain.

Disk osteophyte complex - Where the intervertebral disks interface with the vertebrae, bony spurs (osteophytes) can develop due to wear and tear over time. If large enough, these can push backward into the spinal canal, or sideways into the peripheral nerve roots.

Uncovertebral joint - a bony growth alongside a vertebra that connects it with the vertebrae above. Osteophytes here can impinge on the foramina and the associated nerve roots.

Facet joint - part of the side of the spinal structure. Behind the foramina and to the side of the spinal canal. Osteophytes here can affect the spinal canal and (?) the foramina.

Myelomalacia - Permanent softening of the spinal cord. NOT GOOD. Whatever caused this MUST be fixed before it causes even worse damage.

Cervical lordosis - the natural backward bend (lordosis) of the cervical spine. Viewed from the side, the spine can be seen to alternate between lordosis and kyphosis (forward bend).

Stenosis - narrowing - this can be either due to degenerative changes over time, where various bodies such as disks and osteophytes grow into foramina or the spinal canal, or it mayalso be hereditary. I think that, in your case, you have a certain amount of hereditary canal stenosis, which means the effect of any degenerative impingement on the canal is exaggerated.

Ventral cord deformity - The front ("ventral" - or stomach) of the spinal cord is flattened, or even indented.

Modic changes - new to me - you can look them up and talk to the doc about what they mean.

T1/T2/STIR signal - maybe someone else can explain these - odd that the "hyperintense" level is two down from your worst spinal level (C5-6)

to be continued....

Last edited by WebDozer; 01-16-2012 at 07:07 AM.

 
Old 01-16-2012, 07:05 AM   #5
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

OK, let's look at your worst level, C5-6. Understanding what's wrong here will allow you to extrapolate that understanding to the other levels.

""At 5-6, there is a moderate posterior disc osteophyte complex""

Meaning that the bottom of the C5 vertebra and the top of the C6 vertebra where they interface with the C5-6 disk, have developed bony spurs that project backward into the spinal canal.

""with moderate bilateral uncovertebral and facet joint degenerative changes""

The uncovertebral and facet joints (on both sides) have developed osteoarthritis (bone spurs).

""contributing to severe central canal stenosis with associated cord atrophy and myelomalacia""

Picture a big, flashing red light. "Severe", "atrophy" and "myelomalacia" are words you do NOT want to see in your MRI report. The disk osteophytes, the facet osteophytes and the uncovertebral osteophytes are pressing on your spinal cord from in front and the sides. In your case, the cord has been damaged.

""as well as moderate to severe bilateral neural foraminal stenosis.""

Some/all of those osteophytes are also impinging on the foramina. If "severe", the stenosis is very likely affecting the peripheral nerve, which at this level is the C6. You can read up on what's innervated by the C6, but suffice it to say that it's much of your arm, plus your thumb and forefinger in particular.

to be continued...

Last edited by WebDozer; 01-16-2012 at 07:47 AM.

 
Old 01-16-2012, 07:41 AM   #6
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

I find it REMARKABLE that you can have such severe spinal cord effects (flattening, deformity, myelomalacia) without any mention of disk bulges. In most cases, protruding or even herniated disks cause or at least contribute to canal stenosis. Your radiologist says nothing about them.

In fact, you seem to have only one degenerative problem, but it is severe and widespread. That is osteoarthritis resulting in bone spurs practically everywhere. Either you have been overstressing your cervical spine for a very long time, or you just have a hereditary tendency toward osteoarthritis. Maybe both.

However - and please note, because this is important to your case - the actual osteophytes are everywhere referred to as "mild" and "moderate", yet your spinal canal is severely affected. How can this be? It would be helpful if the radiologist supplied measurements both of the size of the osteophytes and the resulting size of the spinal canal. However, one can INFER that you have two basic problems, the degenerative osteoarthritis, AND hereditary canal stenosis. In other words, MILD deformities can have SEVERE spinal cord effects because your spinal canal started out too narrow and now the spinal cord has nowhere to "run" when osteophytes grow in on it from the front and the sides.

To give an example, a healthy adult male might have a spinal canal measuring 18mm AP (front-to-back). Within that canal is a 10mm spinal cord, with spinal fluid all around it. 3mm osteophytes impinging from the front and both sides will not necessarily affect the cord, because of the leeway provided by that fluid-filled 8mm of extra space.

In your case, you may have a 10mm spinal canal, with the spinal cord tightly fitted inside. Osteophytes growing in from the front and the sides will almost immediately affect the spinal cord, and, in your case, you have a LOT of osteophytes.

As to treatment.... the standard operation for cervical spinal problems is the ACDF. In a C5-6 ACDF, the surgeon would come in from in front, remove the C5-6 disk, substitute a shaped piece of donor bone in its place, then clamp the C5 vertebra to the C6 vertebra. You are then "fused" at the C5-6 level. Often, multiple levels will be done in one surgery, or over multiple surgeries. Some people end up fused all the way from C3 to T1.

In your case, however, the disks themselves do not seem to be the problem. Your problems are ubiquitous osteoarthritis, probably combined with hereditary canal stenosis. So it's hard to see how ACDF's would even help (and, of course, you would lose the range-of-motion provided by the fused levels).

The alternative to ACDF's is to come in from behind and "open up" the spinal canal to provide more room for the cord to escape the attack by the osteophytes. This used to be done (and, unfortunately still is done by some docs), by means of a "laminectomy", where the bones on the back of the spine (the laminas) are REMOVED. This, however, can result in spinal instability, so people with multilevel laminectomies often have had to have posterior fusions done, as well.

The "laminioplasty" is newer (in the U.S., that is, in Japan it is decades old). In what's called an "open door laminoplasty" the surgeon comes in from behind and cuts through the lamina on the most-affected side, swings the lamina backward to open the spinal canal, inserts donor bone in the gap (usually), and clamps the whole thing together with titanium. This can provide and additional 6-8mm of free space for the spinal cord to move backward and away from the osteophytes.

So a laminoplasty would be directly addressing one of your two basic problems, which is the hereditary canal stenosis. As for the osteophytes, the surgeon should trim them back wherever he can during the operation. He should be able to address the facet joints and maybe the uncovertebral joints. I don't know if he can do anything about the disk/osteophyte complexes, because they would be hidden in front of the spinal cord.

So, I hope you will read the "Cervical Laminoplasty Chronicle", because there's a lot of info there to consider. I wrote it with you in mind, but would rather not re-write it all here.

If you have any questions, please ask. Please also keep in mind that I am just an interested, semi-informed and somewhat-experienced AMATEUR.

Last edited by WebDozer; 01-16-2012 at 07:46 AM.

 
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to WebDozer For This Useful Post:
Chitown2012 (01-16-2012), Hartford (10-25-2012)
Old 01-16-2012, 07:25 PM   #7
Member
(male)
 
Chitown2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 54
Chitown2012 HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Thank you so much for your input....Seeing the surgeon tomorrow for consult and a neurologist next week.... No one has tried non surgical remedies, but I get the impression that surgery is needed... Thank again... I'll keep you posted

 
Old 01-18-2012, 03:16 PM   #8
Member
(male)
 
Chitown2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 54
Chitown2012 HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Saw surgeon yesterday and she wants to perform a Laminectomy on levels C3 - C7, at least, and perhaps as far as C3 - T2, with fusion and rods. Does anyone know if patients get Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) sheets on bone graph materials, rods and srcews that they leave inside your body? Suppose to be in hospital for 5-7 days and can't drive/work and will be in a neck brace for 3 months. Not really looking forward this this procedure but will keep everyone posted. Surgery is in 2 weeks.

 
Old 01-18-2012, 06:41 PM   #9
Member
(male)
 
Chitown2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago
Posts: 54
Chitown2012 HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Well it looks as if the neurosurgeon wants to perform a laminectomy with fusion (rods and screws), at minimum, levels C3 - C7, and perhaps T1 & T2 as well. Surgery is in a couple of weeks. She did not think my left hand would regain strength.

My EMG results are as follows:

This is an abnormal study indicative of:
1. Chronic, moderately severe to severe, left C6-T1 cervical polyradiculopathy with ongoing denervation.
2. Mild, left median mononeuropathy at the wrist.

Also, I'm wondering if anyone here knows if patients get spec sheets on the materials left in the body like: screws, rods, bone graft material... Just in case there are promlems laterdown the road....

Thank you in advance for all the information/help/understandingh... Updates to follow....

 
Old 01-19-2012, 04:56 AM   #10
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

This is a big deal. I really, really, REALLY think you need a second and third opinion.

The surgeon obviously agrees with me that the hereditary canal stenosis is the heart of the problem. However, I have my doubts about the laminectomy. Not only is the back of the spinal canal left uncovered, but the instability resulting from removing so much of the spinal structure requires the fusion and rods.

Maybe I'm wrong, but this strikes me as a relatively primitive surgery, done by people who do not know how to do laminoplasties.

 
Old 01-19-2012, 08:40 AM   #11
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,894
Blog Entries: 12
jennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Hi Chitown. Web asked me to take a look at your MRI and see what I think about it. My neck had cord compression from C3 to C7 and severe nerve compression on both sides as well. I decided to do a C3-C6 laminoplasty with a C7 decompression. The laminopasty is different from the laminectomy in that the bone is re-shaped and replaced over the back of the canal to give protection to the cord. In a laminectomy, the bone is not replaced and the cord is forever unprotected. A much older surgery that has fallen out of favor due to the lack of cord protection.

The laminenctomy also requires the fusion with rods and screws where as the laminopasty does not but does use a titanium strip to give some support during the healing time. HOWEVER, to be honest about my situation, I tore a ligament in my neck some 3 months after my laminopasty and ended up dislocating and breaking my neck and am now fused from C3 to T1. So I am aware of how you will end up.

But this massive surgery does not take care of what seems to be a central problem....you have a possible hemangioma in the disk at C6 and that will still not be removed. The laminectomy does not touch the disks and you may still end up with additional surgery to remove the disks, especially the one with the tumor, should it begin to grow. Hemangiomas are there from birth and can suddenly start growing at any time. And they can grow very fast.

I would get a second opinion just so you know that this is okay to leave it in there. I'm dealing with a hemangioma on my arm right now and I am stunned as to how fast it has grown. We have someone here who has had a hemangioma in the cord itself and a couple of others with hemangiomas in the vertebral bone. They can be trouble.

Your laminectomy will allow the cord to move away from a growing hemangioma and that is the only reason I can think of as to why this doc wants to do a laminectomy over a laminoplasty....she thinks the growth will continue and you'll need more room. Why not just remove the disk?

So you can go in different directions but I would think a laminectomy would be the last option and not the first. Be aware that you will continous care for your spine from here on in.

I did a second and third opinions just so I knew everyone agreed with the original surgeon....it's worth the time, effort and money. This is after all, a part of your brain and you want the best brain surgeon you can get and THE most up to date treatment out there.

Jenny(fused C3 to T1)

PS...BTW, my doc said I wouldn't get my left arm back and he was wrong....took about 2-3 years of hard work but I got in back thanks to great physical therapists.

 
The Following User Says Thank You to jennybyc For This Useful Post:
Chitown2012 (01-19-2012)
Old 01-19-2012, 08:47 AM   #12
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,894
Blog Entries: 12
jennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Hi Chitown. Web asked me to take a look at your MRI and see what I think about it. My neck had cord compression from C3 to C7 and severe nerve compression on both sides as well. I decided to do a C3-C6 laminoplasty with a C7 decompression. The laminopasty is different from the laminectomy in that the bone is re-shaped and replaced over the back of the canal to give protection to the cord. In a laminectomy, the bone is not replaced and the cord is forever unprotected. A much older surgery that has fallen out of favor due to the lack of cord protection.

The laminenctomy also requires the fusion with rods and screws where as the laminopasty does not but does use a titanium strip to give some support during the healing time. HOWEVER, to be honest about my situation, I tore a ligament in my neck some 3 months after my laminopasty and ended up dislocating and breaking my neck and am now fused from C3 to T1. So I am aware of how you will end up.

But this massive surgery does not take care of what seems to be a central problem....you have a possible hemangioma in the disk at C6 and that will still not be removed. The laminectomy does not touch the disks and you may still end up with additional surgery to remove the disks, especially the one with the tumor, should it begin to grow. Hemangiomas are there from birth and can suddenly start growing at any time. And they can grow very fast.

I would get a second opinion just so you know that this is okay to leave it in there. I'm dealing with a hemangioma on my arm right now and I am stunned as to how fast it has grown. We have someone here who has had a hemangioma in the cord itself and a couple of others with hemangiomas in the vertebral bone. They can be trouble.

Your laminectomy will allow the cord to move away from a growing hemangioma and that is the only reason I can think of as to why this doc wants to do a laminectomy over a laminoplasty....she thinks the growth will continue and you'll need more room. Why not just remove the disk?

So you can go in different directions but I would think a laminectomy would be the last option and not the first. Be aware that you will need continous care for your spine from here on in.

I did a second and third opinions just so I knew everyone agreed with the original surgeon....it's worth the time, effort and money. This is after all, a part of your brain and you want the best brain surgeon you can get and THE most up to date treatment out there.

Jenny(fused C3 to T1)

PS...BTW, my doc said I wouldn't get my left arm back and he was wrong....took about 2-3 years of hard work but I got in back thanks to great physical therapists.

 
Old 01-19-2012, 08:52 AM   #13
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,894
Blog Entries: 12
jennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Hi Chitown. Web asked me to take a look at your MRI and see what I think about it. My neck had cord compression from C3 to C7 and severe nerve compression on both sides as well. I decided to do a C3-C6 laminoplasty with a C7 decompression. The laminopasty is different from the laminectomy in that the bone is re-shaped and replaced over the back of the canal to give protection to the cord. In a laminectomy, the bone is not replaced and the cord is forever unprotected. A much older surgery that has fallen out of favor due to the lack of cord protection.

The laminenctomy also requires the fusion with rods and screws where as the laminopasty does not but does use a titanium strip to give some support during the healing time. HOWEVER, to be honest about my situation, I tore a ligament in my neck some 3 months after my laminopasty and ended up dislocating and breaking my neck and am now fused from C3 to T1. So I am aware of how you will end up.

But this massive surgery does not take care of what seems to be a central problem....you have a possible hemangioma in the disk at C6 and that will still not be removed. The laminectomy does not touch the disks and you may still end up with additional surgery to remove the disks, especially the one with the tumor, should it begin to grow. Hemangiomas are there from birth and can suddenly start growing at any time. And they can grow very fast.

I would get a second opinion just so you know that this is okay to leave it in there. I'm dealing with a hemangioma on my arm right now and I am stunned as to how fast it has grown. We have someone here who has had a hemangioma in the cord itself and a couple of others with hemangiomas in the vertebral bone. They can be trouble.

Your laminectomy will allow the cord to move away from a growing hemangioma and that is the only reason I can think of as to why this doc wants to do a laminectomy over a laminoplasty....she thinks the growth will continue and you'll need more room. Why not just remove the disk?

So you can go in different directions but I would think a laminectomy would be the last option and not the first. Be aware that you will need continuous care for your spine from here on in.

I did a second and third opinions just so I knew everyone agreed with the original surgeon....it's worth the time, effort and money. This is after all, a part of your brain and you want the best brain surgeon you can get and THE most up to date treatment out there.

Jenny(fused C3 to T1)

PS...BTW, my doc said I wouldn't get my left arm back and he was wrong....took about 2-3 years of hard work but I got in back thanks to great physical therapists.

 
Old 01-19-2012, 01:33 PM   #14
Member
(female)
 
Nanacan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Lake charles,la
Posts: 98
Nanacan HB UserNanacan HB UserNanacan HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

Hey jennybyc-Is a hemangioma the same as syrinx cyst? I dont think it is but figured you would know for sure. The reason I ask is because I have a syrinx cyst & had a 2 level acdf & they said they couldn't remove it because it embedded into my spinal cord. Thanks

 
Old 01-19-2012, 03:05 PM   #15
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,894
Blog Entries: 12
jennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB Userjennybyc HB User
Re: MRI - Cervical Stenosis/Myelomalacia

No, a syrinx is inside the cord and can be very long and narrow. A hemangioma is a benign tumor that arises from a single cell left from the placenta. So it grows a mass of blood vessels like the placenta. Many grow right after birth and others will start just out of the blue. I have one on my arm that just started to grow within the last few months I had another on the nerve of my index finger that grew, then stopped and calcified and that made for a hard mass that hurt....so they took it out.

A syrinx can sometimes be removed but you need a really, really top notch neurosurgeon to literally tweeze it out of the cord without doing damage.

Jenny

 
The Following User Says Thank You to jennybyc For This Useful Post:
Nanacan (01-21-2012)
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
MRI of Cervical Spine--Help belemilus Spinal Cord Disorders 9 08-08-2010 04:43 PM
cervical stenosis - how dangerous is it? Gwendolynn Spinal Cord Disorders 7 07-28-2010 08:46 AM
Advice on new treatments other than ACDF for cervical stenosis with myelopathy frustratedlor Spinal Cord Disorders 19 07-11-2010 10:32 AM
Cervical spinal stenosis-need help reading MRI Likea Spinal Cord Disorders 24 06-15-2009 05:36 AM
Recently dx w/ cervical & lumbar stenosis & have questions Wymom94 Spinal Cord Disorders 1 02-15-2008 02:44 PM

Tags
cervical stenosis, myelomalacia



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



WebDozer (268), jennybyc (197), Realhousewife (42), kenzibenzi (33), NJ Ldy (32), SpineAZ (31), teteri66 (26), frenchfri1003 (21), ladybud (20), feelbad (18)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1004), Apollo123 (903), Titchou (847), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (759), ladybud (754), sammy64 (668), midwest1 (668), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:45 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!